Before Google dominated search, Ask Jeeves depended on a team of humans -- yes, humans -- to answer your internet queries. Ultimately, search algorithms killed the internet's favorite butler, but the idea that humans are worthy competition for the software we create didn't follow him to the grave. Case in point: Ask Ooloo, a digital assistant powered by living, breathing human beings. According to Ooloo's makers, the PPDA (people-powered digital assistant) is staffed with "real people 24/7" ready to offer you quick, localized search results with a personal touch. All you have to do is speak your question, as you would with Google Now, Siri or Cortana, and wait for an answer. We put the iOS app to the test, asking it 'Who invented the Internet?" What it revealed, probably won't shock you.

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Henning Baum (re., Schauspieler sat.1-'Der letzte Bulle'), Serien Kollegen Maximillian Grill, Proschat Mandani (mi.), Gala 'ProS

When we, at Engadget, indulge in the occasional use of the German language, it's usually to fire off Deutschland's version of our favorite four-letter word (hint: it rhymes with sh-high-zuh!). Instead, we're rattling off this mouthful: ProSiebenSat.1 Welt. Gesundheit is right.

The German-language TV channel has big news for its US-based fans: a subscription-based streaming service for the web and mobile. Interested parties that can, you know, understand German are welcome to test it free for a week before going all in on those monthly payments of 7.90€ (about $11 USD). It's pretty much your best bet to catch up on the latest episodes of Der letzte Bulle, Ladykracher and Pastewka, one of which we assume has to be the German equivalent of Keeping up with the Kardashians. Don't make that face. We've all watched it at one time or another. Oh, and Bitteschön.

[Image credit: Peter Bischoff/Getty Images]

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The trusty Google Now launcher that debuted on the Nexus 5 had already made its way to the rest of that family and Play Edition devices. Now, folks wielding any handset running Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean) and later can grab the feature, even if it's absent one of the aforementioned monikers. The software add-on makes Google's card-based repository accessible by swiping to the right of the home screen or speaking an "OK Google" voice command from that main UI. Gadgets that weren't officially stamped by Google hadn't been privy to the functionality, but now even if OEMs drape the OS with their own look and features (looking at you, Samsung), you can still get a taste of stock Android.

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President Obama Signs Executive Order At White House

After getting the approval of both the House and the Senate, the US cellphone unlocking bill needed just one more signature to remove the carrier-swapping restriction. Today, President Barack Obama signed the Unlocking Consumer Choice and Wireless Competition Act into law, making it once again legal for smartphone owners to unlock their device without direct permission from the carrier it's locked to. If you'll recall, the effort began as a petition, and is what the White House is calling "an example of democracy at its best." Should you be in need of refresher on the finer points, we explain the whole thing right here.

[Photo credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images]

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The "Swiss Army knife of electronics." That's the best way Sprint can define the LivePro, a touchscreen projector/Android hotspot made by Chinese manufacturer ZTE. The device, which goes for $300 with a two-year contract, is the first in a brand-new hybrid category -- and depending on how successful it is, it may well be the last. Although the LivePro has a wide range of capabilities that make it useful on many different fronts, its demand will be incredibly niche. What kind of person needs such a unique device, and is it good enough to even attract them?

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HTC One M8 for Windows

The cat's out of the bag, it seems. Just days after we received leaked details of HTC's One (M8) for Windows, Verizon has posted a picture on its web servers (still available as I write) that confirms the smartphone's existence. The device is largely what we expected; it's a straightforward adaptation of the Android-based One for Windows Phone 8.1, complete with custom camera features and TV remote control. There aren't many other clues, although WPCentral has heard that Verizon will carry the handset on August 21st following an already announced HTC event on August 19th. That makes sense, especially since the image not-so-coincidentally shows Friday the 22nd on the calendar -- a day after the rumored release.

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Let's face it: options for outfitting the Nexus line with covers and cases have been rather limited (and pricey) coming directly from Mountain View. That could be about to change though, as Android Police reports that a new option could offer a major boost in custom accessories. The so-called Google Workshop will allow you to create your own case for the Nexus 5 based on either a location map or an uploaded photo of your choice. A live wallpaper is said to accompany that latter option too, so you can keep a consistent theme for every customizable spot on that handset. Right now, it appears that the fifth Nexus phone is the only device privy to the treatment, so we'll have to wait and see if that popular 7-inch tablet gets its own new digs. Unfortunately, there's no indication as to when the Workshop will go live inside Google Play or how much the cases will cost.

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4G is now a mainstream technology in the UK, meaning network operators can chase more frugal consumers with low-cost, own-brand handsets. It's unlikely O2 and Three will get involved in this race to the bottom; they simply don't have the experience EE (through its sub-brands Orange and T-Mobile) and Vodafone do in self-made handsets. EE was the first to make a move with the £99 Kestrel, and Vodafone recently launched its rebuttal: a pair of smartphones in the Smart 4 turbo and Smart 4 power. I've already commented on their price tags (£135 and £175, respectively), which are high enough to make you wince considering their competition. And, after spending a little quality time with the higher-end Smart 4 power, I can't say I feel any different.

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ASUS MeMO Pad 7 and 8

The MeMO Pad HD 7 was arguably the sleeper hit among small tablets in 2013. ASUS' device didn't have the speed of the Nexus 7 or the interface tricks of Samsung's Galaxy Tab 3 line, but it was superbly balanced. It ran smoothly, packed smart software and (most importantly) carried a sub-$200 price. For that reason, this year's MeMO Pad 7 and 8 are potentially exciting; they stick to that familiar formula while bringing in faster processors and a fresher interface. What's not to like? As you'll find out in our review, there are a few aspects that definitely need improvement, or even take steps backward -- but it's also clear that ASUS has budget-tablet design down to a science.

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Auto-correct fails can be pretty hilarious, but if you'd rather avoid them altogether (boo!) maybe a litigious phone case's second coming is up your alley. See, earlier this year Ryan Seacrest's iPhone accessory company, Typo, found itself on the wrong side of the law when BlackBerry filed suit against it. Why? Because, well, its product looked an awful lot like something you'd find on one of the Canadian outfit's devices. But, that copyright infringement applied to Typo, not the almost identical Typo 2. As iMore tells is, the American Idol host has added a few new bits and bobs like a lock key, backlight and battery indicator to the keyboard that'll hopefully distract Chen and Co.'s attorneys. The accessory starts shipping this September, but you can pre-order now for $99 -- whether its maker is back in court by then is anyone's guess.

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We've heard quite a bit about Mr. Zuckerberg's plans to bring low-cost internet access to the otherwise disconnected, and today, his social network announced plans to do just that in Zambia. The new Internet.org app allows users to browse weather, health and employment info at no cost. And that's not all Google Search, Facebook, Messenger and Wikipedia are available as well. Right now, the option is available to Airtel subscribers in the country, but it will roll out to other parts of the world in the future. Cellular service blankets much of the globe, however the cost of the mobile web deters many from opting in. This will certainly help.

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Have a Windows Phone and crave access to BlackBerry's famed messaging app? Today's your lucky day. Announced in a video posted today, BBM is now exiting beta to become available for download in the Windows Phone store. The company said it spent considerable time tweaking the app's interface to fit with Microsoft's mobile OS, and the result is a clean UI that looks considerably different than the versions you'll see on iOS and Android (not to mention BlackBerry OS 10). BBM for Windows consists of three main screens -- chats, feeds and contacts -- and you'll have the ability to pin a chat right to your phone's start screen. Windows Phone users who are new to BBM can pick up a few tips on getting started via the video (posted below). As of this posting, the app wasn't yet live in the Windows Phone store, but the rollout should begin shortly.

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FRANCE-TELECOM-ILIAD-FREE_LOGO

Sprint isn't the only company hoping to shell out billions for the privilege of scooping up T-Mobile's US branch; according to the Wall Street Journal, a French company called Iliad wants in on the action as well. Iliad, which owns a mobile operator in France known as Free, recently made a bid to counter the reported $32 billion offer T-Mobile is already entertaining with Sprint's parent company Softbank. The terms of the deal are unknown, and it's unclear how Iliad can pay for such a transaction, since its market value of $16 billion is merely half of what Softbank CEO Masayoshi Son is putting on the table.

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It's becoming more and more common to find mobile devices with wireless charging capability, either as a built-in feature or integrated into third-party cases. Progress has been somewhat hampered, however, by the fact that no universally adopted standard is available. Of the three major groups trying to corner the market, Qi -- a standard created by the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC) -- has arguably been the most successful at courting manufacturers and carriers (over 200 have signed up so far). The problem is, its abilities have been limited because it only uses a method called inductive charging; in other words, you can power up your smartphone as long as it's sitting on a charging pad. Wireless, sure, but it's still only marginally more convenient than simply plugging the handset in. Fortunately, Qi's adding some crucial functionality later this year that will allow you to charge your device from nearly two inches away.

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Back when Oculus VR first showed off its second virtual reality development kit, the Facebook subsidiary wasn't saying anything specific about the origins of its new, higher-resolution screen. But now that that second dev kit is shipping to pre-order customers, the teardowns have begun and we have a better idea of what it's using: the screen from Samsung's Note 3. Not a similar screen, but the screen directly taken from a Note 3 smartphone -- an AMOLED pushing 1080 x 960 into each eye. Oculus VR even kept the touch module attached, though we'd strongly suggest against trying to use it while wearing the Rift headset.

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