Samsung Gear VR

If you've been curious enough about virtual reality to buy Samsung's Gear VR headset, you've had to visit either AT&T's website or Samsung's to pick one up. Not very convenient, is it? Your VR shopping just got a little bit easier, though, as Best Buy has started carrying the $200 wearable in its online store. Yes, you can order Samsung's immersive display (provided you have a Galaxy Note 4, of course) at the same time as you're looking for a discounted TV. Unfortunately, this availability doesn't extend to Best Buy's retail shops -- you'll still have to buy this experimental headgear sight unseen.

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Sony Xperia Z3 Compact

There's no doubt that Sony's smartphone division is struggling, and it sounds like that's about to exact a big toll on the company's workforce. Nikkei reports that Sony expects to cut 1,000 jobs in its mobile group, adding to the 1,000 layoffs it announced alongside its less-than-stellar summer earnings. All told, Sony will have slashed 30 percent of its phone team's staff by the end of its next fiscal year, in March 2016. The Japanese tech firm hasn't confirmed anything, but further cuts would make sense. Smartphones represent a big drag on Sony's finances, and its accountants are likely doing everything they can to right that sinking ship.

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Of all the mysteries still surrounding the Apple Watch, its long-awaited launch window was easily the most debated. Well, not any more. Apple CEO Tim Cook just confirmed during the company's quarterly earnings call that the company's oft-hyped Watch should ship in April 2015 -- not March like many of us suspected/hoped.

"The creativity and software innovation going on around Apple Watch is incredibly exciting," Cook said after diving into Apple Pay's progress. "We cant wait for our customers to experience them when Apple Watch becomes available."

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Well, it's that time again. Apple has just released its latest batch of quarterly earnings, and wouldn't you know it -- the folks in Cupertino once again sold more iPhones than it has in any other quarter. We're talking 74.5 million phones changing hands since October, up just about 50 percent from its last utterly insane holiday quarter. Apple doesn't break down sales numbers by model, but its smartphones' bang-up performance helped push company revenue to new heights; the company raked in a cool $74.6 billion in revenue, along with $18 billion in pure profit. That is crazy.

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Checking out at the super market with your phone is old hat. But topping off the parking meter, now that's kind of interesting. USA Technologies, a company that handles cashless payments, announced that about 200,000 of its points of purchase will accept Apple Pay. And we're not just talking about NFC vending machines here. This company is outfitting laundromats, parking kiosks and "other self-serve appliances" with the payment terminals. This means that on top of paying for your next tank of gas or grocery trip, you won't have to futz with loose change to do a load of whites or feed that meter.

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Moment Case

If there's one thing (and there is) I miss about carrying around my Lumia 1020, it's that phone's dedicated, two-stage camera button. Designed to mimic "real" camera shutter releases, it's a feature I've missed dearly on my current daily driver, Apple's iPhone 6. Seattle-based Moment seems to think I'm not alone in wanting a more camera-like experience when snapping pics with my phone. Starting today, the small company is taking to Kickstarter to launch the Moment Case -- a camera case it hopes will bring DSLR-like control to iPhone shutterbugs.

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It's been a long time in the making, but Snapchat's new Discover feature is ready to go... and so is the app's transformation from a pure messaging service into a full-blown media destination. Once the app update is in place, a quick tap on a circle icon that lives in the top right corner of the screen takes you away from your inbox and plops in front of a curated selection of stories from media partners like CNN, Yahoo, Vice, ESPN and even Snapchat's own fledgling editorial team.

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LG G3 battery

Scientists have spent a lot of time trying to lengthen battery life, but safety and thickness matter, too. Just ask Boeing about that first problem -- its 787 Dreamliner was grounded for months thanks to battery fires. However, a group of University of Michigan researchers may have found a way to make lithium-ion energy packs that are safer and slimmer at the same time. The team has developed Kevlar-based, nano-sized membranes that insulate the electrodes in a battery while still allowing lithium ions to pass through and create a proper circuit. The extra-thin layers should not only reduce the chances of short circuiting, but allow for more energy in a given space. You could get away with thinner batteries in smartwatches and other devices without giving up battery life... or worrying that your device will spontaneously combust, for that matter.

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Waze showing police on a Moto X

You may use Google's Waze app primarily to avoid traffic jams and watch out for speed cameras, but some American police see it as a threat -- and they want Google to do something about it. Officers speaking to the Associated Press believe that Waze's police finding feature, which is mainly meant to warn about speed traps, makes it too easy for would-be cop killers to find targets. These critics hope to muster support from law enforcement groups and push Google into disabling the feature so that it's not relatively trivial to "stalk" uniformed people from a phone.

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg At Internet.org Summit In Delhi

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has been hard at work connecting the world with not only his social network, but with basic internet access, too. In another step towards doing so in developing areas, the folks in Menlo Park are rolling out Facebook Lite: a version of its Android app that's meant to use less data and work well regardless of network speeds. In fact, it's specifically designed for browsing on 2G networks and in locales where connectivity is extremely limited. At less than 1MB, the software makes for a quick install to wrangle messaging, status updates, and other core features that Facebook users employ. According to TechCrunch, Facebook Lite is in the testing phase, and it's only available in Bangladesh, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa, Sudan, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and Zimbabwe for the time being. However, the app requires Android 2.2, making it an option for most users -- even those wielding low-end devices.

[Photo credit: Arun Sharma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images]

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In large metropolitan areas that are covered with WiFi, you might start to wonder why you pay for a cellular service at all. It's this germ of an idea that has inspired Cablevision to announce Freewheel: a WiFi-based phone service that offers unlimited talk, text and data with no annual contract. The catch, if you hadn't already guessed, is that you'll only be able to use those minutes and MBs while you're in range of the nearest WiFi hotspot.

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Nexus 6

Motorola's Nexus 6 almost had a fingerprint sensor, but Apple spoiled the idea. In an interview with UK newspaper The Telegraph, former CEO Dennis Woodside (who now leads Dropbox) reveals that the handset's dimple was supposed to play home to a discreet recessed sensor, but its supplier couldn't meet its quality demands. "Apple bought the best supplier," Woodside explains, "so the second-best supplier was the only one available to everyone else in the industry and they weren't there yet." At least Moto didn't just, y'know, throw one in anyway.

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Moto X (2014)

In his review of the second-generation Moto X last September, our Senior Mobile Editor Chris Velazco called it "a huge step forward from last year's model." He complimented the seamless feel of the edges and thought its improved OLED screen was "one of the nicest smartphone screens I've seen in a while." But not everything was pure love with the 2014 Moto X. The battery can squeeze out a day at most, and the front camera fails to be "consistently good" and is often slow to focus, with photos full of grain. But in spite of these flaws, Chris felt that the new Moto X "earned itself a spot in the pantheon of smartphone greats."

That's a pretty big proclamation to make; how well does it hold up? To find out, we turn to the discerning opinions of our loyal readers, who have taken to the product database page for the 2014 Moto X to share their own experiences with the phone. With a user average of 9.2, it was a definite improvement over the original Moto X (which averaged a score of 8.8), but would they agree with our reviewer's assessments?

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Craig Federighi talks about HomeKit at Apple's WWDC 2014 event

We hope you weren't in a big rush to outfit your household with devices that use Apple's HomeKit automation technology -- you may be waiting a little while. Recode tipsters claim that Apple started certifying HomeKit gear later than it wanted, pushing the release of many supporting gadgets (and their underlying chips) back to spring or later. While Apple hasn't said whether or not there's a delay, the company notes that multiple companies (such as Elgato and iDevices) formally unveiled their first HomeKit hardware at CES. In many cases, the finished goods won't ship until spring or summer.

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Android Cupcake, Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich and Jelly Bean statues

You might not be happy that Google isn't fixing a web security flaw in your older Android phone, but the search giant now says that it has some good reasons for holding off. As the company's Adrian Ludwig explains, it's no longer viable to "safely" patch vulnerable, pre-Android 4.4 versions of WebView (a framework that lets apps show websites without a separate browser) to prevent remote attacks. The sheer amount of necessary code changes would create legions of problems, he claims, especially since developers are introducing "thousands" of tweaks to the open source software every month.

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