The first flagship phone from Saygus in five years isn't very subtle. Its specs read like every gadget geek's wish list: support for up to 256GB of storage, a 21-megapixel rear camera paired with a 13MP front shooter, stereo Harman Kardon front speakers and insanely fast 60Ghz WiFi before it hits other phones. But there's something to admire in the Saygus V2's (technically, "V squared") excess. It's a phone that's meant specifically for hardware geeks, not everyday buyers. And it's those geeks who probably remember the Vphone, the last device from Saygus that was one of the first hyped-up Android phones, but which ultimately ended up as vaporware. The company may be alive, but it still has a lot to prove with the V2.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Yes, really. This is really a $300 game controller. It's extremely modular -- you can use it with a PC, or a tablet (up to seven inches), or a TV outright (via MHL cable). It folds down to a tiny little oval. There's an attachable keyboard. It's bizarre. I cannot stress that enough.

Who created this madness? Mad Catz. Of course it was Mad Catz. Maybe you'd like to know more? I encourage you to visit the gamepad's website, which is also full of madness. Including that $300 price, which is outrageous. But maybe you really like expensive crazy things? Head below into our gallery for some up-close-and-personal shots of it.

0 Comments

Maybe you remember the bizarre collision of worlds at last year's CES when Ryan Seacrest touched down in Las Vegas to introduce the Typo, a physical QWERTY keyboard case for the iPhone 5/5s. If you do, then you may also recall the controversy and legal tussling over the original Typo's striking resemblance to BlackBerry's Q10 keyboard. One court ordered a sales injunction and another Typo revision later, Seacrest and his partner Laurence Hallier are back at CES to debut another physical keyboard accessory, this time it's the Typo2 for the iPad Air and iPad mini lines. The pair carved out some time during the madness of CES to speak to me about Typo's bumpy start, the impact of customer feedback on product design and the boldfaced names that swear by their QWERTY case.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Sometimes your Tuesday is going horribly and the only way to fix it is face time with your four-legged best friend. We've likely all been there. Petcube wants to help make those bad days melt away with its WiFi-enabled pet camera. More than simply offering video and two-way audio communication via smartphone app (both Android and iOS are supported), each camera has a built-in laser pointer that you can control remotely by dragging your finger across your mobile's screen. We saw it in action with cats in San Francisco (pictured above), and it was pretty cute watching felines chase around a red dot controlled by one of Petcube's employees standing next to us at CES in Las Vegas. The outfit says you can grant access to your camera, too, so people besides you can, say, exercise your pets if you're a bit too busy. Naturally, they just need to download the app to their device of choice.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

While CES isn't usually the kind of show that HTC would make a big deal out of, the company somehow decided to use this opportunity to throw out a new mid-range flagship device: the Desire 826. While it's positioned as a follow-up to the Desire 820 (which is only four months old, by the way), the new model has clearly taken a design cue from the Desire Eye: You get the same hidden BoomSound front-facing stereo speakers (now with Dolby Audio), the same anti-slip soft sides and the same overall look. But rather than using a 13-megapixel front-facing camera, the Desire 826 touts HTC's famed UltraPixel imager on the front, meaning you can take faster and brighter selfies even in poorly lit environments. Great idea, though we wish HTC had come up with this before someone else did it.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

0

JAPAN-US-COMPANY-SONY

LG kicked things off this morning with its CES 2015 press conference, and now it's Sony's turn to do the same. Will we see new smartphones or tablets? What about cameras and UHD TV sets? Whatever it may be, we're going to find out soon enough. The event starts at 8:00PM ET, so stay tuned to this post -- we'll be breaking it down as it happens, live from the Las Vegas Convention Center.

0 Comments

0

CES. It's a massive playground full of electronics, and no one has a presence larger than Samsung. The manufacturer makes gadgets from appliances to cellphones to speakers, and of course increasingly massive HDTVs. It also tends to take an ...odd approach to these kinds of presentations, leading to surprises like Michael Bay's sudden exit last year. Who knows what we'll see in 2015, but come along for the ride right here when the event starts at 5PM ET.

Update: It's all over, but you can relive the event after the break.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

At every CES, Lenovo has a habit of teasing us with a bunch of phones that they explicitly say won't be sold on US soil, so of course, there are more for this year's show. On the left we have the funky tri-color Vibe X2 Pro, which -- you've guessed it -- is a beefed-up version of the Vibe X2 we saw at IFA. Not only does this one have a bigger 5.3-inch, 1080p screen, but it also has a 64-bit-ready, 1.5GHz octa-core Snapdragon 615 with LTE and dual-nano-SIM support, as well as a 13-megapixel camera on both sides of the phone. Bring on the selfies! There's no price for this Android 4.4 device just yet, but we do know that it'll launch in April.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

The last smartphone to feature an optical zoom camera was Samsung's Galaxy K Zoom, but we didn't like it -- no thanks to its inconsistent camera performance plus poor battery life (the bulky body didn't help either). Merely hours away from South Korea, Taiwan-based ASUS decided to have a go at making its own optical zoom-enabled smartphone, which ended up being its surprise announcement at this year's CES: the Lumia 1020 ZenFone Zoom. What we've been told so far is that this $399 device is the world's thinnest smartphone that packs a 3x optical zoom camera, and there's more: It's actually a 13-megapixel f/2.0 imager with optical image stabilization, precise laser autofocus (as used by the LG G3), full manual mode and dual-color LED flash.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Let's face it: With its curvaceous body, low-res screen, self-healing tendencies and lousy camera, the original LG G Flex was a mixed bag if there ever was one. When it came time to craft the inevitable sequel, though, the Korean tech giant agonized over customer feedback for months to figure out what went awry and what was really important to people. The end result of all that brainstorming is the LG G Flex 2, and it shows -- it's dramatically better than the original in just about every way that matters.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Sony SmartWatch 3 review: dull design, but great for runners

This here is the Sony SmartWatch 3. That might make it sound like it's the third iteration in a line of gadgets, but really, it's the first. That's because even though this is Sony's third smartwatch (fourth if you count the Sony Ericsson LiveView), it's actually Sony's first that comes with Android Wear. Both the original SmartWatch and the SmartWatch 2 ran Sony's own proprietary platform, which, while Android-friendly, didn't have nearly the same reach as Google's Android Wear. It's great that Sony has finally seen the light, but the SmartWatch 3 has arrived remarkably late to the party, letting rivals like Motorola, LG and Samsung gain ground. On the other hand, the SmartWatch 3 is currently the only Android Wear option with a built-in GPS radio, allowing for more precise workout tracking. Which, as it turns out, could be enough to help Sony stand apart from the pack.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

ASUS at CES 2011

The spotlight doesn't often fall on the lesser-known Chinese-speaking (both mainland and Taiwanese) companies that set up booth space each January at CES. But if you do pay close attention to their yearly reveals, you'll often find some of the show's more interesting gadgets. Brands like ASUS and Lenovo (among many others) have a knack for either inventing new device categories or pushing the limits of existing formulas. They virtually define the landscape for hybrid PCs, and they're often willing to stretch the boundaries of smartphones, wearables and TVs. In anticipation of the coming CES, we attempt to gauge just what each of these major Chinese-language players will bring to Las Vegas in 2015. But first, let's indulge in a little history lesson.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Exactly 30 years ago today, two men made history by completing the first mobile phone call in the UK. As everyone celebrated the opening seconds of 1985, Michael Harrison, the son of former Vodafone chairman Sir Ernest Harrison, rang his father from Parliament Square in London. The call was supposed to be a surprise; Michael had snuck away from his family's New Year's Eve party in Surrey and driven up to the capital earlier that evening.

In his possession was the Transportable Vodafone VT1, a cumbersome 5kg block with carry handle, antenna and tethered receiver. One of the network's technicians punched in the correct number and passed Michael the handset, as a curious crowd tried to work out who the minor celebrity was and exactly what he was doing. The call connected after just a few rings (perhaps it wasn't such a surprise for Sir Ernest Harrison) and the pair chatted briefly: "Hi Dad, it's Mike. Happy New Year. This is the first ever call on a UK mobile network."

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

My dad called me up a few weeks ago saying he wanted to get mom a tablet for Christmas, one that might be good enough to replace the laptop she hated. It wasn't the hardware causing angst; it was the software: Windows 8. She's pretty comfortable with technology, but migrating from the familiar world of Windows' past was tricky and she wasn't alone -- I didn't find it easy either. While no tablet could completely replace a laptop, for general internet use, it's all she really needed.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments