When it comes to being fit, it's really the small stuff that counts. You can go to the gym as much as you want, run five miles every morning -- but if you eat like crap, drive yourself to the corner store and take the elevator every morning to your 2nd floor office, it'll be all for naught. RunKeeper can already help track each training session as you make your way from couch to 5K, now it's trying to motivate you to keep moving between runs with Breeze. The iOS-only app uses the iPhone 5s' M7 chip to track your movements and count the number of steps you take. Of course, pedometer apps are quickly becoming a dime a dozen. Breeze attempts to set itself apart through simplicity and minimizing user interaction.

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Got an Android device with access to Google's Play Store? Congratulations: It's about to become even more resistant to malware, and you'll barely have to lift a finger. You see, for around two years now, the folks in Mountain View have been able to throw up red flags when users try to install apps of questionable provenance on their devices. Now they're taking it a step further -- Google will soon be able to check up on your apps after you've already installed them.

Why? Well, it's possible that you downloaded some sketchy apps before Google's verification feature went live in 2012. A bad app that previously managed to fly under the radar could also be rooted out as Google continues to learn more about mobile malware. Those situations may seem a mite outlandish, and Android Security Engineer Rich Cannings admits that most people won't ever see one of those notifications. Still, there's no denying this is a solid tool to have in the ol' arsenal, and ComputerWorld previously reported that it'll come in the form of an update to Google's Play Services; so devices running Android versions as old as 2.3 should get that added security without a headache.

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Facebook has been testing new features inside its standalone Messenger app for months, and now the social network is pulling the chat feature from its primary offering. The outfit has included messaging functionality in its main apps for some time now, but late last year, Mark Zuckerberg announced that the company would eventually pull the plug. For a few months now, users that have both apps installed have been linked out to the Messenger software when accessing chat in the regular ol' version. The switch will take place over the next two weeks, and TechCrunch reports that Facebook has begun notifying users of the change.

"The reason why we're doing that is we found that having it as a second-class thing inside the Facebook app makes it so there's more friction to replying to messages, so we would rather have people be using a more focused experience for that," Zuckerberg told TechCrunch in November. This means you'll have to download that Messenger app if you want to keep that direct line of communication open with your Facebook pals, unless you have an Android device that can't run it, use the mobile site or keep your talks confined to the outfit's Paper reader.

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Windows Phone 8.1's storefront

Windows Phone 8.1 may not just add a bevy of software features -- it may improve how you find software, too. WPCentral claims to have leaked details of a Windows Phone Store revamp in the OS that reportedly makes it easier to discover hot apps. Featured titles would take center stage in this new portal, and new sections would help you sift through fast-rising apps or specific categories. Upgrades could soon be less of hassle, for that matter. A new My Apps area would let you check for updates without waiting for notifications, and you could (finally!) tell Windows Phone to update apps automatically. There's no certainty that this storefront will make it into the final WP8.1 release, but you won't have to wait long for confirmation.

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At a cocktail-fueled meet and greet at SXSW, we met with New York Times editors Jill Abramson and Clifford Levy to discuss the news organization's 2014 lineup of services, including a new enterprise dubbed NYT Now. Created as an iPhone (and iPod touch)-only application, NYT Now is the company's latest subscription-based product. On the surface, it appears to be simply a "lite" version of the paper's daily content, but The Times is reassigning nearly a dozen editors to Now full time to curate internal content as well as articles from third-party news orgs, such as Engadget. Now is not without its challenges, though. Full access will run you $8 per month, which, while a far cry from the $45 you'll fork over for a full digital subscription with Times Premier, is still a significant amount. You'll be able to download the app on April 2nd, with free access to headlines, summaries and 10 articles each month. The $8 fee (billed every four weeks) will enable full access to any article that appears in the NYT Now app.

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With more than a million apps available on the App Store, finding the right one is often more troublesome that it needs to be. In an effort to ease that burden, Apple has quietly begun testing a new related search suggestion feature that aids the discovery of new apps, displaying categories similar to your current search term. For example, when you perform a search for Twitter apps, the App Store displays related listings for "news apps," "traffic apps" and "photo editors," queries that loosely match what users might associate Twitter with (okay, maybe not traffic updates). In the past, app suggestions were limited to Genius recommendations and "Customers also bought", but Apple's latest experiment shows it may soon do more with the App Store data available to it. It's not known whether the company is manually curating groups of apps or relying on tags and keywords provided by developers, but it's a small peek at the future we first imagined when Apple bought app discovery service Chomp.

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Apple's iTunes store may still be one of the most popular sources for downloading cheap music, but you need an iOS device to take advantage, and that leaves a heck of a lot of smartphone owners out in the cold. Rather than have those users hand over heaps of cash to competitors, it makes sense for Apple to bring its iTunes store to Android. And according to Billboard, that's exactly what Cupertino may be considering. The magazine's own sources claim that Apple has begun discussions with several record label execs, with topics ranging from a streaming service to compete with Spotify to an iTunes app for Android devices. Launching such an application isn't as simple as dropping it in Google Play, however. Complex negotiations with record labels are reportedly in the very early stages at this point, so it'll likely be some time before we see this latest concept materialize, if it's due to debut at all.

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Cloak app

There are a plethora of geo-location-based apps that make it incredibly convenient to do friendly things, like chat with nearby peers about local hotspots or meet up with a coworker on the fly. A new iOS app called Cloak, however, utilizes services from Foursquare and Instagram for a more anti-social purpose. The brainchild of Brian Moore and former Buzzfeed creative director Chris Baker, Cloak identifies the location of friends (read: those you'd rather not bump into) based upon their latest check-in. While perusing the map, you can choose to "flag" certain undesirables, like exes or annoying third-wheels, to be notified when they wander within a preset distance of your personal bubble. Or you could, ya know, skip town altogether just to be safe.

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This is one cool tool we hope to never use. Esurance's new video appraisal feature for the insurer's Android and iOS apps helps speed up the post-accident process significantly. Typically, you're required to get a vehicle inspection after an accident before the insurance company can send out an estimate for repairs. With the refreshed app, however, an appraiser can use your smartphone's camera to assess the damage while also communicating with customers and the repair shop. You'll still need to set up an appointment (through the Esurance app), but since the agent won't need to travel, you'll be on your way much more quickly. Video appraisal requires a smartphone running Android 4.0+ or iOS 7, a front and rear camera with autofocus and a WiFi or LTE connection. Tablet compatibility is in the works. It's available today in the latest version of the Esurance app.

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Android owners, we'll understand if we don't see you for a few days -- Threes is now available for your phones and tablets. If you're not familiar with Threes, prepare to fall in love. The $1.99 game has been rocking the top of the iOS charts for weeks, but has been MIA for other platforms. The number-based puzzle has you match numbers together to create multiples of three. Sounds simple enough, but it's a bit more challenging than it looks -- especially when you start dealing with triple-digits. The game has an adorable soundtrack, beautiful design, and is more addictive than Flappy Bird. You can try your hand at the game (and start losing hours of your life) now, by heading over to Google Play.

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Starting next week iPhone owners will not only be able to buy your triple-venti-extra-hot-no-foam latte using Starbucks' mobile app, you'll be able to tip your barista for making it as well. The king of coffee is updating its app March 19th to add digital tipping for the first time and make the app easier to navigate. If you're not paying attention in line, a new "Shake to Pay" feature instantly loads your Starbucks card up from anywhere in the app. After you pay, you'll get a push notification encouraging you to drop between 50 cents and two bucks in the store's virtual tip jar. Tips can be adjusted for up to two hours after you leave (in case that macchiato really makes your day), and every purchase is saved in the form of a digital receipt you can access later on.

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Go ahead, ask any youngster around you: selfies are serious business. No one is more mindful of that universal truth than Instagram, which is why it pushed out yet another iOS app update earlier today. No, there aren't any new filters (isn't 19 enough?) -- instead, the company brought some much-needed control to its Lux feature.

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There's nothing quite like the smell of freshly cooked bacon to help you get out of bed in the morning. Unless of course, that smell is a clever r(o)use by an iPhone app and there is no bacon. A new alarm app by Oscar Mayer deceives you out of bed every morning to not only the sweet sound of frying bacon, but to the smell as well. A small gadget attached to your iPhone's headphone jack sends a bacon fragrance your way as the alarm sizzles. But, there is no bacon. It's similar to what we saw last year with Scentee, except this bacon device isn't being sold – you'll have to win it through a sweepstakes on Oscar Mayer's website. The bacon alarm clock also isn't for everyone – Android and Windows Phone users will have to opt for a more vegan, but perhaps slightly less heartbreaking, wake up call. Did we mention there's no bacon?

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Downloading an app from the federal government might not top your list of priorities at the moment, but if you're looking to tick that public service box without a need to worry about measly pay, background checks and furloughs, the FCC could sure use your help. That org's latest venture, the FCC Speed Test app for iOS, delivers yet another connectivity benchmark tool to iPhone and iPad users. This free download also benefits the government's Measuring Broadband America program, however, enabling the FCC to build out a public database of network performance across the country. Unlike its Android counterpart, this iOS app doesn't test performance in the background, so you'll need to fire it up to see how well your cellular or WiFi connection is doing. It's available from the App Store today.

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Exactly a year to the day after it first announced its Knox security solution, Samsung's returned to Mobile World Congress with news that it's making it even easier to secure and manage Galaxy devices. With the launch of Knox 2.0 today, Samsung's changed the way the platform handles Google Play apps, digitally securing their data without the need to run them in a dedicated Knox workspace. Before, personal- and work-related apps were separated, but Samsung says "most" Google Play apps can now live in Samsung's secure world. It's certainly serious about its new features, as CEO JK Shin popped up at the event to drive home Samsung's desire to nail the enterprise market.

Samsung wants more secure apps across the board, so it's also launching Knox Marketplace, a dedicated cloud-based app store that lets tech managers grab apps and install them on all employee phones with a few clicks of a button. Box and GoToMeeting are already on board, and there are plenty of enterprise companies already working to make their apps available. Samsung tells us that the new features will begin rolling out in the second quarter, and it'll come pre-installed on the newly unveiled Galaxy S5. First-generation Knox users will get an upgrade to the new version as soon as their devices get an upgrade to Android 4.4 KitKat -- whenever that may be.

Steve Dent contributed to this report.

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