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Grab a wearable, switch on the 'ole curved TV and fire up your favorite 3D printer. We came, we saw, we conquered and now we're ready to distill it all for you in the form of some high-quality video content. We're not going to suggest that it'll replace the seemingly endless stream of posts we've churned out over the past week or so, but if you've got a cocktail party full of guests you need to impress tonight, it'll help you drop some serious CES 2014 tech news knowledge on their collective heads.

We've pulled together some top editors to offer up an abbreviated view of tech's biggest show of the year, charting trends in old standby categories like HDTV, mobile, tablets and cars, to emerging spaces set to define the changing face of the show for years to come. Oh, and we've also tossed in some fun video of the show's gadgets, because, well, it wouldn't be much of an Engadget Show without that sort of thing, now would it? Toss in a bit of video of your long-time host getting a bit welled up the end, and you've got yourself a little thing we like to call The Engadget Show 49.

'Til we meet again, Engadgeteers.

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Just Mobile was back at CES to sprinkle some magic dust on its new accessories, and this time it involves a mixture of batteries, Lightning docks, cables and styli. We're most excited by the company's AluPen Digital, a fine-point capacitive stylus that works on any modern mobile device, without the need of Bluetooth or any additional sensor. We also got an exclusive look at the upcoming AluBolt Pro Lightning dock for the iPad, along with the Lounge Pro and Lounge Ice iPhone docks, the AluCable Flat and the aluminum refresh of the Gum++ battery. Read on to check them out.

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While this year was predictably quiet for smartphones, we weren't expecting it to be this quiet. Only a small sliver of companies announced new handsets at the show, and the ones we saw -- with the exception of the Sony Xperia Z1 Compact -- didn't impress. Even tablets, which have had pretty healthy showings in years past, failed to make an appearance. Naturally, this left a gaping void that needed to be filled by something, and wearables were up to the task. Read on as we take a look back at just a few of this week's mobile highlights.

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SONY DSC

The lights are now dimmed throughout the many halls of CES, and none are more perturbed by darkness than the folks at Oledcomm. Illumination is the company's specialty, after all; or, more specifically, LiFi technology, which facilitates high-speed data transmission via pulsating light sources (though they appear static to the naked eye). We swung by the firm's booth in Vegas to check out the various demos on display, including a two-way, 10 Mbps link tying a Macbook to a router. What interested us most, however, was a concept smartphone that took instructions from the many lamps scattered around the booth.

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There's a technological revolution going on; innovation is at an all-time high; and we've seen it all before. While many of the devices we've seen this week are new and even exciting, the unending hymn of hyperbole that echoes through the halls of the LVCC is an old standard. For months leading up to the big show, small startups and tech giants flood the inboxes of tech journalists, attempting to catch their attention with bold and often ridiculous claims. And on the show floor, sprawling booths from the likes of Samsung and LG boast laundry lists of "world's firsts." Each year, we put all of that aside to bring you only the freshest goods CES has to offer -- until now. It's time to unleash the hype beast!

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While Miracast wireless display mode is now available on many Android devices, it is both loved and loathed -- loved by those who want just wireless screen mirroring, and loathed by those who want to keep doing other things on the smaller screen. If you belong to the latter group, then MediaTek's got your back. At CES, the Taiwanese chip designer showed off its solution that lets you beam video content to a Miracast-enabled display, without having to give up your mobile display for your other tasks -- be it internet browsing, emailing or even gaming. See for yourself in our video after the break.

A company rep told us that in order to take advantage of this solution, app developers would need to use MediaTek's upcoming API to enable this feature. There's no word on when consumers will get to use this at home, but given that MediaTek's shipped more than 200 million smartphone processors last year, we're pretty sure that developers will want a share of this piping-hot pie.

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The jury's still out on Android gaming (exhibit A: OUYA), but that's not stopping Huawei from taking a dive into that niche corner of the industry. Its Tegra 4-based Tron mini-console, announced here at CES 2014, pairs a cylindrical-shaped hub with a Bluetooth controller that hews quite closely to the Xbox 360 mold OUYA also went after. Before we get your hopes up though, take note that Tron's for China only -- at least, for now anyway. A Huawei rep did say that the company's looking into further market expansion, but given its track record with smartphones in the US, we have a hard time believing Tron will see these shores anytime soon.

The Tron console itself runs a half-skinned version of Android JellyBean (version 4.2.3) that presents a clean menu overlay with feature tiles for access to games, Huawei's store, video, application, settings and featured titles. That slick menu selection comes to a screeching halt, however, as soon as you attempt to select anything other than games, bringing you face-to-face with Android's ugly underbelly -- much like on the OUYA.

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Smartphones with interchangeable parts is the future... or so companies like Motorola and ZTE believe. Both manufacturers are currently working on prototypes of what's known as modular smartphones. Such a device, if it comes to market, will give consumers a few benefits: the chance to customize their phone exactly the way they want, the ability to upgrade specific parts (or modules) of your device without having to upgrade to a completely new version, the option to buy and sell individual modules to others and less electronic waste left over as a result. Neither Motorola or ZTE has exactly kept their efforts a secret, but what we're unsure of is when we can expect to see real hardware show up on the market. Fortunately, ZTE showed off its first concept device (under glass, unfortunately) on the CES floor this week, and reps told us that we should plan on seeing this concept come to fruition within the next two years.

The phone, known as the Eco-Mobius, looks a lot sleeker than what we've seen of Ara so far, and is divided into four separate swappable modules for LCD, core (processors, RAM and ROM), camera and battery. This comes in quite handy for enthusiasts of all kinds who want to take advantage of different modules; if you're into photography, you could theoretically take multiple modules with you, each one with its own strengths and weaknesses -- we'd fancy having a macro lens module for specific shots. Perhaps you want to change the size of your screen, depending on whether you're at the office, at home or a party? No problem. Need a stronger battery? Sure thing. In addition to making this kind of phone a reality, its designers are also putting together a platform in which users can buy, sell and trade modules with each other. Hopefully we'll see more of this concept as things come together, but so far we're very curious about how the final product will look down the road. While we wait for the future to catch up with our dreams, enjoy our images below.

Joseph Volpe contributed to this post.

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Searching for a nice-looking smartwatch, but not interested in having the kitchen sink? ConnecteDevice's new set of analog timepieces are about as minimalistic as you can get without removing the "smart" element entirely. Cogito consists of two models, and although there really isn't much difference between the two, the more expensive one is the more elegant option. The watches promise to be extensions of the phone, rather than replacements, and each features a series of LED icons that light up when you have a notification waiting for you on your handset. The company believes this is the ideal use for a smartwatch, since many people don't care to interact with the notifications that start buzzing on their wrists.

The higher-end Cogito differs from its counterpart by offering Caller ID and giving you the option to mute incoming calls, as well as the ability to tap the watch to light it up so you can see your alerts. ConnecteDevice reps boasted that both watches will easily last up to a year before you need to replace the battery, a remarkable length of time that's likely the result of Bluetooth 4.0+LE support. The watches are compatible with iOS 7 and Android 4.3+, and watch (pun not intended, but welcome) for the Cogito Pop to come out near the end of next month for $129, and the Cogito original in mid-March for $179.

Update: We have updated our post to reflect that ConnecteDevice is the name of the company, whereas Cookoo is a different lineup.

Joseph Volpe contributed to this post.

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Brad and his team of mobile-centric pals sit down for some deep talk about feelings and, of course, smartphones. Sony has launched its Xperia Z1 Compact, which scales down size but not specs, and its compatriot, the Z1S, which takes the standard Z1 into waterproof territory. Not to be outdone, Samsung delivers some new tweaks on the Galaxy series, with its Note Pro and 12.2-inch Tab Pro. It's definitely a fun atmosphere on stage, but this is one party that T-Mobile's John Legere failed to crash -- although his hijinks did get a mention. Hop on down to the streaming links below for the full Mobile Podcast show!

Hosts: Brad Molen

Producer: Jon Turi

Hear the podcast:

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It's no secret that we're pretty big fans of SwiftKey 'round these parts, but even we couldn't have predicted where it'd wind up next. Today, the keyboard app announced that its adaptive text-entry will be integrated with Clarion's forthcoming AX1 head unit. It might seem odd at first, but since Clarion's kit has native apps for email and web browsing, predictive text (compared to a standard keyboard) ought to make the device easier to use. As SwiftKey tells it, the company is taking everything it's learned from the mobile environment, and applying it to other areas where it makes sense. In other words, this likely isn't the last time we'll see the third-party keyboard somewhere other than a phone or tablet. The AX1 is expected to release sometime this quarter for $800, and if you're feeling antsy you can pre-order one right now.

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T-Mobile has just announced that it plans to end one of the last remaining barriers to get people to switch over to its network: those pesky early termination fees. At its fourth Uncarrier event at CES 2014, the carrier announced that starting tomorrow, customers from the three other competing national carriers -- Sprint, Verizon and AT&T -- can trade in eligible handsets to any T-Mobile location, switch over and get an instant credit of up to $300. You would then purchase a T-Mobile handset and then send your final bill from your previous carrier to T-Mobile -- either via mail or upload to T-Mobile's website -- as proof of your early termination fees. The magenta carrier will then send you an additional payment of up to $350 per line (for up to five lines) to pay those off, and both individual and family plans apply. Only those who are trading in phones, transferring their number and getting new handsets from T-Mobile are eligible to partake in the deal.

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There's big, there's b-i-g and then there's "oh my god, are you [redacted] kidding me this is [redacted] BIG!" That's pretty much how we felt when we first laid our eyes and outstretched hand on Hisense's X1, a 6.8-inch Android smartphone first introduced at this year's CES. You wouldn't be wrong for thinking it's a tablet -- it pretty much unofficially is and depending on your taste and needs, that could be a good thing. The X1, which is slated to launch in China before the US, comes outfitted with what we'd expect from a high-end smartphone: Snapdragon 800, 13-megapixel camera, 1080p IPS display, 3,900mAh battery and Android 4.4 KitKat. So the performance and shine are there, but its dimensions stop it just short of being practical in daily use.

With Qualcomm's Snapdragon 800 powering the X1, the overall user experience zips along smoothly and briskly. There's hardly any hesitation when effecting input actions, accessing the app drawer or launching applications. And viewing angles are also excellent, owing to that IPS display. As you can see from our gallery (demo video to come soon), the X1's also running a light skin atop Android, but it's not so cluttered as to make the phone confusing and nearly unusable a la Samsung's TouchWiz. Though the X1 model we previewed was on running 4.3 Jelly Bean, Hisense reps assured us it would ship with KitKat onboard.

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