Thanks to accessories like Google Cardboard and Samsung's Gear VR, using a smartphone to enter a virtual reality world has become relatively simple. However, those options have the limitation of being available to use only with Android, leaving iOS users wondering what it would be like to access something similar on their device. Here's where a new Indiegogo campaign comes in. Pinć VR is a novel peripheral which, along with a companion application, can morph your iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus into a virtual reality headset (similar to what Gear VR does with the Galaxy Note 4).

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Until now, if you wanted to share clips from the show you're watching with your friends, running it back on the DVR and filming your TV with Vine was an easy option. Other workarounds achieve more less than stellar results, but a new app for iOS and Android looks to make things easier, and gives those vids a quality boost, too. Want to make sure your pals see Lorde's awesome dance moves during the AMAs? Just tap the TV icon on the app's main screen to view a list of shows that are currently on air. Once you've made a selection, pick from a smattering of scenes, with the most recent shown at the top. Choosing one brings up an editing pane to fine-tune the clip, and after you choose a cover frame and caption, the desired footage is ready to be shared via Facebook and Twitter.

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StreetSmart SmartWallet

So long as you still need physical ID cards and cash, you'll need something to carry them -- but that doesn't mean that you're stuck with a low-tech purse or wallet. StreetSmart is crowdfunding the SmartWallet, a money holder with both a Bluetooth-connected GPS locator and a 1,000mAh battery to charge your phone. It's not nearly as world-changing as the company's (rather hyperbolic) promo video suggests, but it's potentially handy if you tend to forget your cash or phone when you head out the door. Leave the wallet behind and you'll get a heads-up through an Android or iOS app that will help you find it, including directions within 50 to 150 feet; lose your phone and a button on the wallet will make your mobile device ring.

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Google Play Music was absent from T-Mobile's Music Freedom options... until now. After a public vote to see who should be next, Mountain View's streaming library will no longer gobble your data on the UnCarrier's network. Google's music service is among 14 others, including Xbox Music and SoundCloud, that won't count against that monthly allowance when you're in need of some tunes on-the-go. Of course, Spotify, Rdio, Pandora and ten others were already given the free pass, so with the recent additions, that total now tallies 27 in all. The full list of today's additions awaits on the other side of the break.

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HTC RE Camera review: a fun personal shooter with room to grow

My father's camcorder was a common sight on childhood vacations. Trips to Mount Rainier, the Oregon Coast, Disneyland, skiing, weddings -- you name it, there's video evidence of my siblings and I enjoying time together. I'm lucky to have grown up in an era where this technology was available, but today these memories can be captured more easily and with less sophisticated (read: less expensive) equipment. We have quick and easy access to cameras at a moment's notice, thanks to smartphones and tablets, and now another form factor is starting to gain momentum: personal cameras. With the exception of the GoPro, this genre is now seeing an influx of small, hand-held devices that are small enough to put in your pocket or bag and can still take decent photos and videos.

HTC is one of the companies rushing to get into this space with the RE camera (pronounced "Ree"), an awkwardly named gadget that's shaped like a tube, packs a 16-megapixel camera and 1080p HD video capture and features cross-platform support so Android and iOS users alike can take advantage of it. Can this tiny camera take the place of my father's camcorder? What else is it good for? And is it worth paying $200 even if you already have a smartphone camera? Keep Reading to find out.

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BT O2 Logo

Following in the footsteps of Take That, S Club 7 and 5ive, BT appears determined to get the band back together. The company has confirmed to us that it is in talks with European communications giant Telefonića to buy back O2, almost a decade after it sold the operator for £17.7 billion. It's no secret that BT is currently readying its own mobile service (with a little help from EE), but according to to Spanish news site El Confidencial, it could be willing to hand over a 20 percent stake as part of a "strategic alliance" between the pair.

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Samsung's bright idea with the Galaxy S4 Active was simple: Take a Galaxy S4, and shove it in a body that didn't shy away from drops, dust and water. When our Sarah Silbert put the device through its paces, she found that the device was better-looking than your average rugged handset. There was, however, a "but" lurching around the corner, since the device had a weaker battery life, camera and display compared to its older sibling. Still, plenty of you would have taken advantage of AT&T's deal to grab one of these, so why not head over to the forum and tell us what life has been like with this device?

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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 graphics cards

The patent war between NVIDIA and Samsung isn't going to wind down any time soon. Samsung has backed up its countering lawsuit against NVIDIA with a US International Trade Commission complaint asking the agency to block imports of NVIDIA's GeForce graphics chips and Tegra mobile processors. While it's not clear just which parts are under scrutiny, the dispute names a slew of third-party device makers who'd have to stop selling hardware in the US. Most of them are video card designers, such as Biostar and EVGA, but the action would also affect Tegra-based gadgets like OUYA's mini console and the Wikipad gaming tablet.

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Earlier this month, Google Maps for Android received the requisite Material Design update and tacked on in-app restaurant reservations for good measure (in the US). A new version is rolling out, and with it comes some handy features to lend a hand with those navigation needs. The app will display time, weather and a smattering of facts about your destination in addition to letting you know exactly how much time that alternate route will save. In addition, Maps can show or hide traffic with a simple voice command, should you need to sort the info without futzing with that handset. Version 9.1 should hit your devices soon, but if you can't wait, the folks over at Android Police have the APK available for manual install.

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Amazon Fire HD 6 review: great value for a $99 tablet

Here's a question: How did Amazon know it was time to make a $99 tablet? Because of focus groups? Its ace marketing department? Close: user reviews. Let's not forget that Amazon is best known for its retail empire, so when lots of people start buying cheap tablets, the company catches on quickly. And when shoppers start giving them lousy user reviews, well, Amazon notices that too. After reading lots of write-ups from disgruntled customers about tablets with chintzy build quality, the company decided it could do better. The Fire HD 6, a 6-inch tablet priced at $99, is the company's cheapest and smallest slate yet, and it's designed to take on all those unreliable no-name devices that shoppers seem to hate so much. Suffice to say, it offers some great value for the price. Here's why.

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Have you ever walked into a beer or wine store only to be overwhelmed by the vast selection, including many options you'd never even heard of? We've all been there, but there's a new app that should help recommend options you've yet to taste. Next Glass uses your phone's camera to scan a bottle before offering you a score as to whether or not you'd like it. Based on ratings submitted the first time the app gets fired up, and scores continually added along the way, the software uses its so-called Genome Cellar to sift through a beer or wine's chemistry and predict your taste preferences. While you're browsing the shelves, the app can be used in beer, wine or a "both" modes for targeted queries, should the need arise. Once a bottle is scanned, you can also peruse to your friends list to see if others will dig your selection at dinner, add specific tasting notes and leverage the GlassMatch tool to find similar beverages. Ready to give it a go? Next Glass is free in both iTunes and Google Play.

Update: When I mentioned chemistry, I meant actual science. Here's how the folks at Next Glass explain the inner workings:

Next Glass has developed the world's first Genome Cellar, an extensive database that contains the chemical makeup -- or "DNA" -- of tens of thousands of wines and beers. By looking at each bottle on a molecular level, Next Glass defines a unique taste profile for every bottle by analyzing thousands of chemical elements.

To arrive at a personalized score, Next Glass bring in some heavy duty chemistry equipment that analyzes the composition of various wines and beers.

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Google's Android Lollipop statue

Remember the Rockstar Consortium? The group was formed by a handful of tech giants (including Apple, Microsoft, Ericsson and Sony) to buy a treasure trove of patents and promptly sue both Google and some Android partners, which promised one of the bigger legal battles in recent tech history. Well, it's not going to be as dramatic as first thought -- Google has agreed to settle its part of the lawsuit. The terms of the deal aren't available and will take a few weeks to hash out, but it's likely that Google is forking over some cash to Rockstar given that Cisco did the same earlier in November. It's also unclear if ASUS, HTC, Samsung and other manufacturers have reached their own settlements. However, it's hard to see them keeping up the fight for much longer when Google itself is out of the picture.

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Well, that was fast. Twitter casually mentioned at its Analyst Day festivities last week that it'd soon give users the ability to share public Tweets in private conversations, and now a new update to its apps and web clients means you can do just that. Either a long-press on a Tweet or a quick pop into the 'More' menu in Twitter's mobile and desktop versions respectively will let you dump that micro-missive into a Direct Message conversation, where it'll pop up in a tiny card for lightspeed perusal. We can hardly contain our excitement either.

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Square Register on an iPad mini

Square's Register app has done a lot to drag stores' payment systems into the modern era, but only in the US -- venture elsewhere and you've usually had to pay at a conventional (and often very limited) terminal. That might not hold true for much longer, since Square has just released a version of Register that works worldwide. The Android and iOS software now handles sales in 130 currencies, and communicates in French, Japanese and Spanish; if a tapas bar in Madrid wants to give you a digital receipt or ask for feedback, it can. It'll take a while for companies around the world to start using Register, but don't be surprised if you see it in action the next time you go on vacation.

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Ever since the first cloud storage services hit the web, they've been a prime destination for thousands upon thousands of uploaded photos. Unfortunately, many of those services don't have polished user interfaces that allow for easy viewing and sharing -- unless you're just a big fan of file manager-esque folders and list views. In April, Dropbox debuted Carousel, an app that seeks to solve that problem by grouping your images together by date and letting you scroll through endless years of photos and sharing your favorites with friends and family. The service was only offered on iPhones and Android smartphones until today, when Dropbox announced that it's now available for iPads and the web, with support for Android tablets coming in the coming weeks.

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