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Leet hax0r stuffs a Kaoss Pad into his Les Paul

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If you're a Radiohead or Muse aficionado, you've probably considered matching some of their Korg Kaoss Pad-generated sounds with your own guitar prowess. The Kaoss Pad generates all sorts of space age effects that can be naturally controlled through the touch-sensitive pad, and works fine right out of the box, but guitar hackin' Phil wasn't appeased. He found the effort to reach away from his guitar and fiddle with the Kaoss to be too immense, so instead he drilled a hole into his Epiphone Les Paul and mounted the touch pad right next to the bridge for ultimate access. The pad connects to the processing part of the Kaoss via a serial connection, but Phil did mount the box's "hold" button on the guitar for locking in effects. If none of this is making any sense to you, peep the YouTube video after the break and watch Phil shred on his new hacked-up axe.

[Via Hack-A-Day]



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