Latest in Breaking news

Image credit:

Fujitsu melts faces and wallets with FLEPia, the first color e-book for general consumption

Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links


After years of teasing -- FLEPia was first announced in April of 2007, and first proven in 2006 -- Fujitsu has at last released its color e-book (or e-paper mobile terminal, as they'd like you to call it) to the masses. Featuring an 8-inch XGA screen capable of displaying 260,000 colors, along with Bluetooth, WiFi and up to 4GB of storage via SD card, and measuring less than half an inch thick, FLEPia's not just getting by on color alone. Fujitsu promises 40 hours of continuos use, and the unit can be operated by its touchscreen or the assortment of function buttons. Naturally you can do the regular e-book thing, but the Japanese version of the device also includes full-on Windows CE 5.0, which would probably be a bit of a chore to use with the relatively slow screen refresh times of e-ink (1.8 seconds for a single wipe), but undeniably retrofuturistic. FLEPia ships on April 20th in Japan for 99,750 Yen (about $1,010 US).

Update: Now with snazzier press shots!

Gallery: Fujitsu FLEPia | 4 Photos


[Via Engadget Japanese]

Read - English press release
Read - Videos of FLEPia in action

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

The best consoles, games and accessories for students

The best consoles, games and accessories for students

View
Trump tries to overturn ruling stopping him from blocking Twitter users

Trump tries to overturn ruling stopping him from blocking Twitter users

View
Divorce dispute leads to accusation of crime in space

Divorce dispute leads to accusation of crime in space

View
OnePlus 7T might pack a wide-angle camera

OnePlus 7T might pack a wide-angle camera

View
Scientists bioprint living tissue in a matter of seconds

Scientists bioprint living tissue in a matter of seconds

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr