Latest in Science

Image credit:

Nobel Prize in Physics shared by CCD inventors, fiber optics pioneer

Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links


It's not every year that the Nobel Prize in Physics falls within our scope of coverage, but this year turned out to a big exception, as the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has deemed it fit to recognize two breakthroughs in the fiber optics and digital photography. The first of those (and half of the $1.4 million prize) goes to Charles K. Kao, whose work in the mid-60s getting light to travel long distances through glass strands made the fiber optic cables we have today possible. The second half of the prize is divided between Canadian Willard S. Boyle and American George E. Smith, who both worked at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, New Jersey, and invented the so-called charge-coupled device semiconductor, better known to anyone that has ever looked at a digital camera spec list as a CCD.

[Image courtesy Nobelprize.org]

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

'Gears 5' will add new modes and maps in its first six months

'Gears 5' will add new modes and maps in its first six months

View
Hulu's 'Castle Rock' season 2 teaser shows the origins of 'Misery'

Hulu's 'Castle Rock' season 2 teaser shows the origins of 'Misery'

View
YouTube is shutting down its TV-friendly web interface

YouTube is shutting down its TV-friendly web interface

View
SIM-based attack has been used to spy on people for two years

SIM-based attack has been used to spy on people for two years

View
Discord is pulling its subscription service's free games library

Discord is pulling its subscription service's free games library

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr