Latest in Science

Image credit:

Suspended animation shocker: lack of oxygen could be the key to surviving a deep freeze

Laura June Dziuban
June 17, 2010
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

Researchers in Seattle are coming closer to discovering the secrets of suspended animation. Experimenting with yeast and worms, Dr. Mark Roth has been able to determine that a significant decrease in oxygen before the deep freeze of an organism makes surviving the thaw much, much easier, and may account for several cases where people have appeared to be frozen to death but were later revived. Dr. Roth's aim, he says, is not to be able to freeze people for long periods (such as is the case in the classic film Encino Man), but to help medical professionals "buy time" and advance their understanding of the effects of freezing on the human body. Sure, but if it means we might get to meet up with Pauly Shore in like, a thousand years, why don't we just shoot for the stars on this one? Video is below.



All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

Apple may bring 'real' home screen widgets to iOS 14

Apple may bring 'real' home screen widgets to iOS 14

View
School districts ban Zoom over security concerns

School districts ban Zoom over security concerns

View
Honeywell says it built the world's most powerful quantum computer

Honeywell says it built the world's most powerful quantum computer

View
Apple TV Channels offers free Epix until May 2nd without signing up

Apple TV Channels offers free Epix until May 2nd without signing up

View
Google's COVID-19 reports show where people are obeying stay-at-home orders

Google's COVID-19 reports show where people are obeying stay-at-home orders

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr