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Motorola slaps Microsoft with a pair of patent infringement lawsuits, says it's such a shame

Sean Hollister
11.10.10
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Looks like Motorola's about to fight a legal battle on two fronts -- Apple on one hand, and Microsoft on the other. Microsoft fired the first shot last month with a nine-patent ITC complaint and a second salvo alleging that Motorola was charging unfair licensing fees for 802.11 WiFi and H.264 video last week, it's now Moto's turn to retaliate with a pair of legal complaints. The cellular company now claims that Redmond's infringing a total of sixteen patents with everything from Microsoft Exchange to Bing Maps to the Windows operating system itself -- as well as the aforementioned video codecs and wireless tech, of course. Moto's also determined to rub a little salt in the wound, it seems, as the company just pushed out a press release with the following statement: "It is unfortunate that Microsoft has chosen the litigation path rather than entering into comprehensive licensing negotiations, as Motorola has mutually beneficial licensing relationships with the great majority of technology companies industry-wide." PR after the break.

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Motorola Mobility Files Patent Infringement Complaints Against Microsoft

November 10, 2010

LIBERTYVILLE, Ill. – Nov. 10, 2010 – Motorola, Inc. (NYSE: MOT) today announced that its subsidiary, Motorola Mobility, Inc. has filed complaints against Microsoft Corp. (NASDAQ: MSFT) with the U.S. District Courts for the Southern District of Florida and the Western District of Wisconsin alleging infringement of sixteen patents by Microsoft's PC and Server software, Windows mobile software and Xbox products.

The Motorola patents directed to PC and Server software relate to Windows OS, digital video coding, email technology including Exchange, Messenger and Outlook, Windows Live instant messaging and object oriented software architecture. The Motorola patents directed to Windows mobile software relate to Windows Marketplace, Bing maps and object oriented software architecture. The Motorola patents directed to Xbox relate to digital video coding, WiFi technology, and graphical passwords. Motorola Mobility has requested that Microsoft cease using Motorola's patented technology and provide compensation for Microsoft's past infringement.

Kirk Dailey, corporate vice president of intellectual property at Motorola Mobility, said, "Motorola's R&D and intellectual property are of great importance to the Company and are renowned worldwide. We are committed to protecting the interests of our shareholders, customers and other stakeholders and are bringing this action against Microsoft in order to halt its infringement of key Motorola patents. Motorola has invested billions of dollars in R&D to create a deep and broad intellectual property portfolio and we will continue to do what is necessary to protect our proprietary technology."

Mr. Dailey noted that Microsoft also has filed separate patent infringement litigation against Motorola. "It is unfortunate," he said, "that Microsoft has chosen the litigation path rather than entering into comprehensive licensing negotiations, as Motorola has mutually beneficial licensing relationships with the great majority of technology companies industry-wide."

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