Latest in Access

Image credit:

US funds shadow networks, builds 'internet in a suitcase' for repressed protesters

Sean Hollister
06.12.11
1 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links

Whether a repressive government, a buggy DNS server or a little old lady is behind your internet outage, it can't be much fun, but the US government sympathizes with your plight if you're dealing with reason number one. The New York Times reports that the US State Department will have spent upwards of $70 million on "shadow networks" which would allow protesters to communicate even if powers that be pull the traditional plug -- so far, it's spent at least $50 million on a independent cell phone network for Afghanistan, and given a $2 million grant to members of the New America Foundation creating the "internet in a suitcase" pictured above. It's a batch of mesh networking equipment designed to be spirited into a country to set up a private network. Last we'd heard, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had pledged $25 million for just this sort of internet freedom, and the New America Foundation had applied for some of those bucks -- see our more coverage links below -- but it sounds like the money is flowing fast, and in multiple directions now.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Share
1 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

Engadget’s guide to Home Entertainment

Engadget’s guide to Home Entertainment

View
Tesla's crash test lab video shows real and virtual Model 3 wrecks

Tesla's crash test lab video shows real and virtual Model 3 wrecks

View
TiVo's 'free' streaming service starts rolling out

TiVo's 'free' streaming service starts rolling out

View
NASA demos spacesuits for its Moon and Mars missions

NASA demos spacesuits for its Moon and Mars missions

View
Sony’s 360 Reality Audio launches this fall with 1,000 tracks

Sony’s 360 Reality Audio launches this fall with 1,000 tracks

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr