Latest in App store

Image credit:

Chinese authors to petition Apple to halt book downloads

Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links

A group of Chinese authors is petitioning Apple to halt the distribution of their books through multiple apps in the App Store, according to the 21st Century Herald Tribune (as reported by Reuters). The authors are part of a group called the Writers Rights Alliance, and this isn't the first time the Alliance has gone after a technology company for offering its books for download without consent. The group previously petitioned China's largest search engine, Baidu, to cease the publication of its books in the Baidu Library (similar to Google Books).

However, a spokesperson for the Writers Rights Alliance said Apple's allowance of apps on the App Store is a graver situation. The Baidu Library offered Alliance books downloads for free, but some of the apps in the App Store make a profit through sales of the app or in-app purchases. From the Writers Rights Alliance's perspective, Apple is infringing on the Alliance's intellectual property by taking its 30 percent commission on sales of the authors' works. Apple has not yet publicly commented on the matter.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

The 2019 Engadget Holiday Gift Guide

The 2019 Engadget Holiday Gift Guide

View
Amazon's smart shelves will re-order office supplies automatically

Amazon's smart shelves will re-order office supplies automatically

View
What's coming to Prime Video in December: 'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel'

What's coming to Prime Video in December: 'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel'

View
Fortnite: Save the World's new area is a dungeon crawl

Fortnite: Save the World's new area is a dungeon crawl

View
BMW spends billions to secure batteries and drivetrains for its EVs

BMW spends billions to secure batteries and drivetrains for its EVs

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr