Latest in Google

Image credit:

YouTube's got big plans for web TV: specialized channels with niche and original content

127 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links

YouTube's come quite a long way from its roots as a repository for random videos from the public. It's gone from "Chocolate Rain" and the Tron guy to streaming Disney classics and now creating original, quality content. The New Yorker spoke extensively with YouTube's Global Head of Content Robert Kyncl about the site's future plans, and YouTube's got its sights set on grabbing a big slice of TV's $300 billion pie. Kyncl thinks the future of TV is in niche content, and YouTube's original channels are just the vehicle to deliver it direct to your digital door. The site is commissioning people and companies to create the channels (as opposed to individual shows or pieces of content) which gives the creators freedom to program their channels as they see fit -- all YouTube asks is that they provide a certain number of hours of programming per week. This production model is apparently pretty attractive to content producers, given the talent that's on board and the amount of content that'll be rolling out over the next six months.

The idea is that all the original content will get people watching YouTube for longer periods of time, and in turn grant more opportunities to reap ad revenue. Of course, these specialized channels don't provide the wide advertising reach of traditional television, but they do allow advertisers to target very specific audiences with focused ads. That presumably provides them with better bang for their buck. Time will tell if YouTube's new plan will win the war against traditional television and web TV (including Kyncl's former employer Netflix), but free, quality on-demand content certainly sounds good to us. Get a fuller accounting of Kyncl's vision at the source below, and feel free to sound off in the comments if you're picking up what he's putting down.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Share
127 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

Uber will restrict NYC drivers' access to app due to new regulations

Uber will restrict NYC drivers' access to app due to new regulations

View
GNU founder Richard Stallman resigns from MIT, Free Software Foundation

GNU founder Richard Stallman resigns from MIT, Free Software Foundation

View
 FCC approves first commercial use of 3.5GHz band

FCC approves first commercial use of 3.5GHz band

View
What's on TV: 'Spider-Man: Far From Home'

What's on TV: 'Spider-Man: Far From Home'

View
Russia reportedly breached encrypted FBI comms in 2010

Russia reportedly breached encrypted FBI comms in 2010

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr