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Apple wins injunction against Motorola in Germany over 'rubber-banding' patent

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Hope and pray all you want, but the patent wars are far from over. The latest chapter in the ongoing game of IP Risk hands Apple a victory over the Google-owned Motorola Mobility in Germany. If you thought the recent licensing deal would put the kibosh on further flare ups between the two, you were sadly mistaken. The Munich I Regional Court awarded Cupertino an injunction against Moto devices over the so-called "rubber-banding" patent, which relates to the bounce back animation when scrolling to the bottom or top of a list. The fate of infringing phones isn't set in stone yet, as there's still room for appeal, though, a €25 million bond would score Apple an enforceable preliminary injunction. One relatively simple solution would be for Moto to implement the stock Android "glowing" animation, which would bypass Apple's claims. Though, an even better solution would be for all parties involved to quit their bickering over patent minutia and focus on making the best products possible.

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