Latest in Blackberry

Image credit:

Google, BlackBerry, EarthLink and Red Hat ask DoJ and FTC to help starve patent trolls

63 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

Tired of all the patent-related stories? Especially the ones that seem like they are more about financial gain than fairness? We thought so. We'd imagine it's even more of a frustration if you're one of the companies regularly involved. No surprise then that some firms -- such as Google, BlackBerry, EarthLink and Red Hat -- have decided to do something about it, taking the fight directly to the FTC and DoJ. In a recent blog post, Google explains that -- along with its collaborators -- it has submitted comments to the aforementioned agencies, detailing the impact that "patent trolls" have on the economy.

While the financial cost to the US taxpayer is said to be nearly $30 billion, the four companies also point out how such behavior hurts consumers even further, suggesting that when start-ups and small businesses are strong-armed, innovation and competition suffer. Some specific practices such as "patent priveteering" -- when a company sells patents to trolls who don't manufacture anything and therefore can't be countersued -- also come under direct criticism. The cynical might assume this all comes back to the bottom line, but with the collaborative extending an invitation to other companies to help develop revised, cooperative licensing agreements, they are the very least making it difficult for them to engage in similar behavior in the future. At least until the FTC and DoJ respond.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
63 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

Downloaded Disney+ movies will keep working even if they leave the service

Downloaded Disney+ movies will keep working even if they leave the service

View
16-bit 'Aladdin' and 'Lion King' cartridges are returning in 2020

16-bit 'Aladdin' and 'Lion King' cartridges are returning in 2020

View
Samsung's fix for Galaxy S10 fingerprint scanning will roll out soon

Samsung's fix for Galaxy S10 fingerprint scanning will roll out soon

View
Apple Pay is more popular than Starbucks for US mobile payments

Apple Pay is more popular than Starbucks for US mobile payments

View
Tesla turns a profit as it spins up trial production in Shanghai

Tesla turns a profit as it spins up trial production in Shanghai

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr