Latest in Science

Image credit:

Telescopes spot an explosion that took place just after the Big Bang

23 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links

Space is vast. So vast, in fact, that if a sun exploded shortly after the Big Bang, the light from the fire would have only brushed the Earth's surface in the last few months. One such gamma-ray burst, believed to be 12.1 billion years old, was detected by Southern Methodist University in Dallas on April 19th. Since astronomers don't know much about the shape or structure of the early universe, data from the burst will be trawled in order to glean more facts about where we all came from. In many ways, it's a bit like getting a telegram from a long-deceased relative about buried treasure, except it's nothing like that.

[Image credit: Southern Methodist University]

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
23 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

Runkeeper drops its Wear OS app due to a 'buggy experience'

Runkeeper drops its Wear OS app due to a 'buggy experience'

View
Drako's GTE electric supercar will be a four-motor, 1,200HP monster

Drako's GTE electric supercar will be a four-motor, 1,200HP monster

View
Nintendo says there is no Switch exchange program

Nintendo says there is no Switch exchange program

View
IKEA creates a business unit devoted to smart home tech

IKEA creates a business unit devoted to smart home tech

View
US will reportedly give Huawei another temporary reprieve

US will reportedly give Huawei another temporary reprieve

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr