Latest in Bounty

Image credit:

Kim Dotcom offers whistleblowers $5 million to help Megaupload's case

Sharif Sakr
06.09.14
16 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links

The basic facts of how Megaupload was shut down in 2012 are public knowledge. But the founder of the file-sharing service, Kim Dotcom, believes there's a subtext to what really happened -- and he's looking for your help to prove it. In essence, he claims to be the victim of a "corrupt" plot between two back-scratching parties: the US authorities, which supposedly wanted to secure the re-election of President Barack Obama, and the movie moguls of Hollywood, who allegedly offered influence over votes in return for having Megaupload terminated for copyright abuse. The only problem? Dotcom will actually have to prove all of this to a New Zealand court, otherwise he'll face extradition to the US, not to mention a string of further civil lawsuits. And so far, it isn't going well.

In a recent tweet, Dotcom claimed that he's been unfairly denied access to the other side's evidence, and that he's also been prevented from seeing his own confiscated data. His latest tactic, therefore, is to offer a cold (or at least recently defrosted) cash bounty: $5 million if you're a "whistleblower" inside the movie industry or a law enforcement agency who can convince the court that Megaupload was illegally targeted. If that sounds like you, Dotcom suggests that you start your bounty-claiming process by uploading submitting your evidence to an anonymous leak site, or to a newspaper.

(Editor note: the lead image comes from Kim Dotcom's Internet Party website and features an Obama lookalike.)

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
16 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

Engadget's 2019 Back-to-School Guide

Engadget's 2019 Back-to-School Guide

View
Tesla delays price hike for self-driving upgrade

Tesla delays price hike for self-driving upgrade

View
New wristband could predict aggressive outbursts in people with autism

New wristband could predict aggressive outbursts in people with autism

View
Harley-Davidson is exploring electric bicycles

Harley-Davidson is exploring electric bicycles

View
Researchers create electronic lens that works better than the human eye

Researchers create electronic lens that works better than the human eye

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr