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Original Apple co-founder Ronald Wayne auctioning off early Apple documents

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The story of Ronald Wayne almost sounds like the plot of a screwball comedy. One of the three original co-founders of Apple, Wayne sold his 10 percent stake in the company for $800 early in the company's life, and then forfeited any future claims towards profits for $1,500 later on. Despite these missteps, Wayne is incredibly important in Apple's early history, writing the manual for the Apple I and drawing the company's first logo.

Now Wayne is selling off early documents from his time at Apple, including blueprints, proofs for the original Apple I manual, and drawings. Here's the lot description from Christie's.

APPLE COMPUTER COMPANY (founded 1 April 1976). The personal archive of Apple Co-Founder Ronald Wayne.COMPRISING:

Ronald WAYNE (b. 1934). Proof sheets for the Apple-1 Operation Manual. Palo Alto: Apple Computer Company, [1976]. Eleven sheets, printed on rectos only. Comprising front cover, text and warranty. A COMPLETE SET OF PROOFS collected by Ronald Wayne, with the exception of the folding schematic that would have been printed by a different process.

[With:] Ronald WAYNE. Personal archive of preparatory drawings and blueprints for the casing of the Apple II Computer. [Palo Alto, ca 1976-77]. Comprising: 8 original pencil sketches on paper, 11 x 16 in. (6) and 17 x 22 in. (2); and 17 blueprints, 22 x 34 in. (5), 16 1/2 x 22 in. (2) and 8 1/2 x 11 in. (10). Wayne's drawings and blueprints show the enclosure, panels, door, hinges, pivots etc. The final version of the Apple II was introduced on 16 April 1977 at the West Coast Computer Faire. Although the final version contained certain recognizable elements of Wayne's early renderings, such as the gently sloping front panel holding the keyboard, the result was quite different. This series of renderings illustrates the rigorous industrial design process employed in Apple's formative years: a process that can certainly still be seen in the company's adventurous, innovative leap forwards in its combination of applied science and design.

[With:] Apple-II. Advance Order Information. Palo Alto, 1977. Bifolium (275 x 428 mm; 10 3/4 x 16 3/4 in.). THE EXCEEDINGLY SCARCE ORDER FORM FOR THE APPLE II. As most examples would have been filled out and returned to the company, an original example, unmarked, is a very rare ephemeral piece of Apple history.

The lot is expected to sell for $30,000 - $50,000. If you'd like to place a bid, head over to Christie's.

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