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Image credit: AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus

Make music with the Large Hadron Collider through a web app

Quantizer turns particle collisions into sweet sounds.
Jon Fingas, @jonfingas
05.30.16 in AV
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AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus

Now that music has come to the Large Hadron Collider, it's time for the giant science ring to make some music of its own. Meet Quantizer, a project from students Juliana Cherston and Ewan Hill that turns the ATLAS experiment's many, many particle collisions into music. The web app grabs data (in real-time when possible), cleans it up and maps it to musical notes. After that, it's just a question of the style you want to hear. There are cosmic sounds if you prefer an ambient vibe, or house music if you'd like something a little more dance-worthy.

One peek at Quantizer and you'll know that it's fairly limited right now. You can't hand-pick the data you want to turn into music, and you'll have to contact the creators if you want to be more adventurous. Even so, this is a clever way to translate raw scientific data into something more approachable.

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