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Apple is now presenting its privacy policy as if it were another product

The privacy policies themselves have not changed.
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It's not uncommon for users to skip reading an app's privacy policy because it's too long and jumbled. Apparently, Apple wants to change that. Today, it released a new privacy page that makes its privacy policy easier to read and understand. The new privacy page looks more like a product page than your standard screen of black and white text.

The refreshed apple.com/privacy page uses just a few words to describe how each app protects your privacy. If you want to know more, you can click the + icon and you'll get a two-paragraph explanation. Head over to the features tab, and Apple provides even more info on privacy related to Safari, Maps, Photos, Messages, Siri, Apple News, Wallet and Health. All of the info is broken down into digestible pieces.

The new page brings in Apple's design aesthetic, so it's not just full of text. Most importantly, the update does make Apple's privacy policies easier to read or skim. The policies themselves have not changed.

Just yesterday, Facebook launched a new section of messenger.com/privacy to provide clear, visually appealing info on Messenger's privacy, safety and security features. And last year, Google updated its privacy policy to make it easier to understand. As privacy and security become, understandably, more of a focus, perhaps Apple, Google and Facebook can encourage others to make their privacy policies less of a bore.

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