Android-Smartphones von Motorola: Microsoft klagt wegen neun Patentverletzungen

Franziska Weiss
F. Weiss|10.02.10

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Android-Smartphones von Motorola: Microsoft klagt wegen neun Patentverletzungen



Microsoft hat Motorola wegen neun Patentverletzungen durch Android-Smartphones verklagt. Dabei geht es um "die Synchronisation von Emails, Kalendern und Kontakten, das Koordinieren von Meetings und darum, wie in Apps Signalstärke und Akkukapazität angezeigt werden". Wir erinnern uns, auch Apple hatte eine Patenklage im Bereich Android gegen HTC eingereicht. Ob diese neue Klage nun in einem Lizenzabkommen enden wird, wie es zwischen HTC und Microsoft im Bereich Android bereits geschehen ist? Microsofts knappe Presseerklärung findet ihr nach dem Break.


Microsoft Files Patent Infringement Action Against Motorola

REDMOND, Wash. – Oct. 1, 2010 – Microsoft Corp. today filed a patent infringement action against Motorola, Inc. and issued the following statement from Horacio Gutierrez, corporate vice president and deputy general counsel of Intellectual Property and Licensing:

"Microsoft filed an action today in the International Trade Commission and in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington against Motorola, Inc. for infringement of nine Microsoft patents by Motorola's Android-based smartphones. The patents at issue relate to a range of functionality embodied in Motorola's Android smartphone devices that are essential to the smartphone user experience, including synchronizing email, calendars and contacts, scheduling meetings, and notifying applications of changes in signal strength and battery power.

We have a responsibility to our customers, partners, and shareholders to safeguard the billions of dollars we invest each year in bringing innovative software products and services to market. Motorola needs to stop its infringement of our patented inventions in its Android smartphones."
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