73
Engadget
Score
A dependable product that doesn't really stand out from the competition.
73

A dependable product that doesn't really stand out from the competition.

How we score

The Engadget Score is a unique ranking of products based on extensive independent research and analysis by our expert editorial and research teams. The Global Score is arrived at only after curating hundreds, sometimes thousands of weighted data points (such as critic and user reviews).

Engadget Summary

When we reviewed the first Chromebook a year ago, we concluded that Chrome OS isn't for everybody. If you need certain desktops apps like Photoshop even when you're on the go, you're never going to appreciate what Google's trying to do here; there will always be some hole in your workflow that keeps you crawling back toward your PC. By design, Chrome OS is at its best when the user has always-on connectivity, which means for the foreseeable future, at least, it's destined to remain something of a niche concept.

The good news is that Google's taken a half-baked, experimental product and done an admirable job of fleshing it out. After spending a few days testing the software, we can confidently say that multitasking is a lot easier when you can view multiple windows onscreen at once, and when you have shortcuts pinned to the bottom of the screen, below the browser. It's also hugely helpful to be able to edit documents offline instead of just view them. Ditto for being able to read books offline, or use Hangouts for video chat instead of the calling feature built into GChat. And it could be even better: It would be nice to add shortcuts to docs, books and other things to the desktop, which currently amounts to a lot of blank, unusable space. More sophisticated photo-editing tools would be welcome, and we'd love to be able to share photos to sites other than Picasa.

Even without these things, version 19 marks a welcome update for existing Chrome OS users, and should suffice for the classrooms that are already issuing Chrome devices to students. Heck, it might even be time for curious early adopters to give Chrome OS a second look. But as Google starts selling more Chrome devices in retail, we have a harder time believing many consumers will be ready to put up with these limitations, especially as tablet apps grow more sophisticated, and as we start to see Transformer-like Win8 devices with touch-friendly apps and physical keyboards. Even Ultrabooks are starting to come down in price, and offer some of the features that have made Chrome OS devices appealing, such as fast resume times. Given how many affordable portable devices there are to choose from, Chrome OS might have the best shot at catching on if companies like Samsung would relax the price of their wares.
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Scores

Engadget

73
 

User Reviews

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72
Average Critic Score

Ecosystem (apps, drivers, etc.)

77
 

Configurability

65
 

Speed

80
 

Openness

53
 

Ease of use

87
 

How It Stacks Up

52

Engadget

Not yet scored
 

Critic

54
 

User

48
 
73

Engadget

73
 

Critic

72
 

User

73
 
91

Engadget

91
 

Critic

82
 

User

79
 

Engadget

Not yet scored
 

Critic

Not yet scored
 

User

94
 
Similar Products

How It Stacks Up

52

Engadget

Not yet scored
 

Critic

54
 

User

48
 
73

Engadget

73
 

Critic

72
 

User

73
 
91

Engadget

91
 

Critic

82
 

User

79
 

Engadget

Not yet scored
 

Critic

Not yet scored
 

User

94
 
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