The Buyer's Guide

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Google Chromecast (2013)

84
Engadget
Score
There's a lot to like about this in spite of a few flaws.
84

There's a lot to like about this in spite of a few flaws.

How we score

The Engadget Score is a unique ranking of products based on extensive independent research and analysis by our expert editorial and research teams. The Global Score is arrived at only after curating hundreds, sometimes thousands of weighted data points (such as critic and user reviews).

Engadget Review

Chromecast is an easy way to stream internet video to your TV from almost any source. With a price of just $35 it's a bona fide steal.

Pros
  • Inexpensive
  • Simple and easy to set up
  • App implementation is slick and easy to use
Cons
  • Limited app support for now
  • Chrome browser casting is a less-than-ideal UX and requires fairly new computer hardware to stream in HD
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Scores

Engadget

84
 

User Reviews

90
Vance
Short review: for the price, this is a no-brainer. Buy it.We have a Roku, an...read more
80
nkline
Great device. Excellent for the price. I got it with a Netflix promo code which...read more
80
TheLivingKing2
This is a good start for Google but the Chrome cast needs more support and features....read more
Write a Review

Score Breakdown

 
82
Average Critic Score

Media support

73
 

Video quality

82
 

Design and form factor

81
 

Ease of use

87
 
Product Review
SlashGear
This device connects with software, not with hardware, over a Wifi connection in your living room. It’ll work with the YouTube app on iOS, you can access this button with YouTube in a Chrome internet browser – and we’ll see what else as soon as hackers get their hands on it, too!
Product Review
Android Central
Born from the ashes of the Nexus Q, Chromecast is an HDMI dongle just a couple inches long. It connects, as you'd expect, to your Android phone. It's able to automatlically turn on your TV and switch inputs, and start playing media automatically — if your TV is CEC-enabled.
Product Review
Time
Once connected, you’ll be able to hand video and audio content from your phone, tablet or computer off to your TV set, where it’ll be available for all to see (or hear) on the biggest, nicest screen in your home.
Product Review
Engadget
While we take no issue with the shape itself, that flared out end does concern us that it may take up the space of two HDMI ports despite it needing only one to operate. Regardless, it's a solid little thing, constructed of black plastic and jammed with the 2.4Ghz wireless radio needed.
Product Review
CNET
The compact 2-inch device will work with Netflix, YouTube, Google Play Movies and TV, and Google Play Music at launch, with support for future services, including Pandora, coming soon. It's a cross-platform device, with support for both Android and iOS devices.
Product Review
Gizmodo
From the looks of it, Chromecast is what we've been waiting for from a set-top-box for a long time. Rather than a platform-siloed experience like the one you get from Apple TV— Chromecast leaves the options wide open.
Product Review
Android Central
With updated versions of Youtube, Google Play, Netflix and other apps on the phone side, Chromecast will offer functionality nearly identical to what we saw with the Nexus Q. While you use your phone or tablet as a remote, the Chromecast pulls down content directly from the web.
Product Review
Android Community
One important aspect is the Chromecast works on all devices, and is built to scale perfectly too. You can go from streaming a video from your Nexus 7, to swapping it out and “casting” a tab from Google Chrome on your iPhone 5 in seconds. It does it quick, accurately, and scales perfect.
Product Review
Mashable
If you’re settling in for a movie night, Chromecast supports a video queue to line up a playlist for the evening. Similar to Google’s ill-fated media streamer Nexus Q for music, the device allows your friends and family to add their own contributions to the queue, creating the ultimate playlist.
Product Review
Forbes
The device, which looks like one of those USB thumb drives, plugs directly into a TV’s HDMI port. It also comes with a handy extender cable for TVs like mine where there isn’t enough clearance for the device itself.