doxxing

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  • Carlo Allegri / Reuters

    Here's why CNN isn't 'doxing' anyone

    by 
    Jessica Conditt
    Jessica Conditt
    07.07.2017

    With the addition of three sentences, CNN turned a relevant news story into an utter mess. This week the organization uncovered the identity of HanAssholeSolo, the Reddit user who created the GIF tweeted round the world: Donald Trump beating up a man with the CNN logo plastered over his head. Media outlets also discovered HanAssholeSolo's history of publishing anti-Semitic and racist messages on Reddit, and he deleted his account after sharing a lengthy apology. Here's where CNN messed up: In an effort to appear transparent, the network said it would not publish HanAssholeSolo's name, as he had "shown remorse" and promised not to post bigoted messages in the future. This segment concluded, "CNN reserves the right to publish his identity should any of that change." CNN was immediately accused of blackmailing the Redditor, while some outlets -- mainly far-right ones -- took things a step further, claiming the news organization was actually doxing him. This is not true. CNN is not doxing anyone. But, to better understand why CNN's tactics were simply ominous and self-destructive, rather than potentially illegal, it's crucial to answer the following question: What is doxing? This is going to take more than one line.

  • Jeff Wasserman / Alamy

    Proposed bill would make doxxing a federal crime

    by 
    Swapna Krishna
    Swapna Krishna
    06.29.2017

    While many internet harassment tactics, such as doxxing and swatting, are considered illegal under state criminal laws, the coverage is often indirect. More often than not, law enforcement has difficulty identifying and prosecuting these types of crimes. But now, Representatives Katherine Clark (D-MA), Susan Brooks (R-IN) and Patrick Meehan (R-PA) want to criminalize these behaviors at the federal level with the Online Safety Modernization Act of 2017.

  • shutterstock

    Crafty prisoners hid DIY computers, committed identity theft

    by 
    Timothy J. Seppala
    Timothy J. Seppala
    04.12.2017

    In what sounds like a plot line from Orange is the New Black, a pair of Ohio prison inmates took decommissioned computers, used them for nefarious purposes and hid them from guards by stashing the machines in a ceiling. According to regional news site Cleveland the two inmates, Adam Johnston and Scott Spriggs, pilfered computers that were supposed to be torn down and recycled and instead used them to connect to Ohio's Department of Rehabilitation and Correction network. They then created access cards for restricted areas.

  • Reddit bans 'alt-right' community over harassment

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    02.01.2017

    Reddit isn't done cracking down on harmful communities. The social site has banned its r/altright subreddit for violating policies against "the proliferation of personal and confidential information." Members were doxxing people to harass or threaten them, in other words. Reddit didn't tell us exactly what prompted the move, but it clarifies that there were "repeated violations" of its doxxing policy. Moderators either couldn't or wouldn't police users' behavior, then. You can read the full statement below.

  • Carl Court / Getty Images

    Wikileaks considers exposing verified Twitter users' data (Updated)

    by 
    David Lumb
    David Lumb
    01.06.2017

    WikiLeaks once claimed to stand for the people against the shadowy, truth-occluding governments of the world (primarily, the United States). But the last couple years saw the organization swerve into questionable territory as an Associated Press report revealed that its mass disclosures had included personal information on hundreds of innocent people, including two teenage rape victims and a gay man living in the homosexuality-intolerant Saudi Arabia. Today, Wikileaks' Task Force sister organization tweeted that it is considering revealing the personal, financial and occupational information of every "verified" Twitter account.

  • Guide helps you fight online harassment

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    12.09.2015

    Harassment may be a regular part of the modern internet landscape, but that doesn't mean that you have to simply sit there and take it. Feminist Frequency, which is all too familiar with harassment and threats, has posted a guide to protecting yourself against the onslaught of digital bullies, stalkers and trolls. In some ways, it's about observing common sense privacy and security policies: avoid sharing more personal info than necessary, use difficult-to-crack passwords and stay on guard against malware and other exploits.

  • Daily Roundup: All things Windows 10, cryptocurrency, tiny synths and more!

    by 
    Jaime Brackeen
    Jaime Brackeen
    01.21.2015

    Microsoft showed off the latest Windows 10 features today and also shook things up with a few other announcements -- like Windows Holographic (!). In other news of note, WhatsApp makes the jump to desktop, we take a stab at explaining cryptocurrency and Teenage Engineering comes out with an adorable set of synths you can fit in your pocket. Get reading for details on these stories and more!

  • GamerGate target starts online harassment prevention program

    by 
    Timothy J. Seppala
    Timothy J. Seppala
    01.21.2015

    Despite Twitter making it easier to report cyber harassment, its measures still fall woefully short. To wit, game developers Zoe Quinn, one of GamerGate's biggest targets, and Alex Lifschitz have teamed up to form an online abuse help network. Crash Override says its goal is to provide a support network for victims of SWATting, doxxing and other maliciousness both preventatively and reactively. It accomplishes this by using "well-established, humane and transparent channels to disempower abuse and reduce the ability abusers have to perpetuate it." The outfit notes that in its trial runs it's effectively helped abuse targets head off SWATting attempts and lock down their personal information, too, all without resorting to more harassment. What's more, Crash Override counts whitehat hackers, infosec professionals and lawyers among its agents.