We've already some efforts to tailor Bluetooth for use with medical devices, but it looks like a team of researchers from Queen's University Belfast have now come up with another method of keeping devices connected, which they say is more efficient and better suited for implants. Their solution is effectively a "skin-tenna," which makes use of a puck-like device worn on the outside of the body that allows wireless signals to "creep" along an individual's skin. That, the researchers say, not only minimizes the "off-body signals," but requires far less power than Bluetooth or other wireless technologies, which is obviously a plus when a battery change consists of a trip to the operating room.

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