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Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week's most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us -- it's the Week in Green.

In a big win for the environment, New York just became the first state in the country to ban hydraulic fracturing, the controversial natural gas drilling technique also known as fracking. Governor Andrew Cuomo announced the decision this week following the release of a report that raised concerns about the health effects of fracking. In other green energy news, Australian households are beefing up their use of solar energy at an impressive rate -- one in five Australian homes is now powered by the sun. (By comparison, just 0.4 percent of homes in the US have solar panels.)

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Bitcoin surrounded by various world coins

Charlie Shrem, former Bitcoin Foundation board member and CEO of the now-defunct exchange BitInstant, has been sentenced to two years in prison for helping Silk Road users anonymously swap cash for digital currency. Silk Road, as you know, was the online marketplace infamous for hosting anonymous drug and gun sales that was busted by the FBI back in 2013. A version 2.0 went up shortly after that, but it suffered the same fate as its predecessor this November. Based on evidence gathered during the crackdown, Shrem agreed to partner with Robert M. Faiella to trade over $1 million in cash from buyers. Faiella was the one with direct contact to buyers, hiding behind the name BTCKing to post ads promoting his dollar-to-Bitcoin business on the marketplace.

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March Madness Streaming

Stop us if you've heard this one before: Dish Network is without a couple of channels tonight because it couldn't reach a deal with major media company. After Turner and CBS, this time it's Fox. The dispute between the two is only affecting the Fox News and Fox Business channels, although Dish Network says the problem is that Fox wanted to bring some of its other channels into renewal negotiations, and blames the broadcaster for the blackout. Specifically called out are sports and entertainment channels (Fox Sports, FX, FXX?) Dish claims Fox wanted to triple its rates on. Of course, Fox has its own version of the events, claiming Dish is the one doing the blocking, and lauding the news channel's "nearly two decades without a blackout. For now, we'll just call this one a weekend break from the drone of cable news (the truly concerned can check out each side's propaganda websites -- Fox, Dish) and will let you know if anything changes.

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Instagram on Android

Many would argue that cops cross the line when they impersonate people on social networks to catch suspects, but that doesn't mean that fake accounts are always off the table. In a recent opinion, New Jersey district judge William Martini contends that police don't need search warrants to create bogus Instagram accounts for the sake of seeing a suspect's photos. As Martini explains, it's "consensual sharing" -- the perpetrator is both making these pictures public and willingly providing access to others. That's bad news for Daniel Gatson, an alleged burglar who insisted that law enforcement needed probable cause (that is, reasonable belief that there's evidence of a crime) to peek at an Instagram feed laden with shots of cash and jewelery.

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It's been a busy week, folks: We spoke with Seahawks quarterback Russel Wilson about how the NFL uses the Surface Pro 2, interviewed RuPaul about "gaymers," learned that North Korea was the source of the Sony Pictures hack, and more. So sit back, relax and click on the gallery below. You know you want to.

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A banner advertising 'The Interview' goes down

Apparently, the US is willing to recruit any ally it can get in its digital battles -- including countries that are frequently its adversaries. Sources for both the Associated Press and the New York Times claim that American officials have asked China to implement a block that would "cripple" North Korea's ability to launch cyberattacks like the one that hobbled Sony Pictures. Unfortunately, this request may be more than a little optimistic. China reportedly agrees that the attacks aren't cool, but it hasn't promised help. It doesn't exactly have much of an incentive to lend a hand when it's frequently engaged in cyberwarfare with the US.

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Google's no stranger to tweaking your photos automagically, and now it's extending that expertise to video. By using Google+ and its auto-backup system for your media, Mountain View says it can adjust the lighting, color, stability and, soon enough, speech in any video you shoot. Just be sure to have Auto Enhance activated on your device and, well, that's the only thing you have to worry about actually. It's a bit different than what the search giant did with Auto Awesome videos, actually, and if you want to see an admittedly low quality sample, pop beyond the break.

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Evernote's bringing Context, one of its more interesting announcements during its fourth conference in October, to Android and Windows. This feature, which was first made available to iOS and Mac users in November, pulls content (based on what you're typing, hence its name) from various sources and displays them on screen. By "various sources," we mean your old notes, your co-workers' notes and a handful of websites, which includes The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company and TechCrunch -- just click on an entry inside the Context panel to read it.

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Most of us will never be astronauts -- sorry to break it to ya -- but we can at least pretend to be aboard the Orion capsule with this video (below the fold), courtesy of NASA. Orion's camera captured 10 minutes of footage from the time it started blazing through Earth's atmosphere until it deployed its parachutes to slow down its descent into the ocean. You'll even see the plasma (created by friction between the atmosphere and the heat shield) change colors as the capsule speeds up and temperature increases. NASA launched a test flight of the Lockheed-made spacecraft in early December to test its components, especially its heat shield.

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Google is ready to up the level of Chromebook voice control, judging by a new, experimental release. According to François Beaufort, you can now say "OK, Google" to activate voice search on your Chrome OS notebook anytime the screen is on and unlocked. That always-on functionality has been available for a while now on Android phones and tablets, but until now, Chromebook users had to first open the app launcher or a new tab in Chrome. As it's still in the experimental stages, you must be running on the dev channel and enable the relevant flags, as shown in the source. Following a short voice training session, you'll be ready to start barking commands.

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