Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

If Chrome were human, he'd/she'd be puffing on authentic Cuban cigars right about now. The browser's finally made its way to the Caribbean country, where it was blocked, along with other Google services, for the longest time. While Mountain View didn't directly blame US trade sanctions for the delay, the company intimates in its announcement post that it's the reason why the country's residents couldn't officially install the browser. Of course, enterprising Cubanos have likely found a way to download Chrome long ago, but now people can easily install it across platforms (iOS, Android, Windows, Mac OS X, etc.) by accessing a special portal.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

The music industry is extremely well-blanketed on the web, what with services like Pandora, iHeartRadio, Spotify, Rhapsody, iTunes Music and many, many more. But one can easily argue that the same can't be said about online videos -- namely, those available at no cost on YouTube, Vimeo, DailyMotion and other similar sites. Here's where N3twork believes it can help. The startup, which describes itself as a "personal network for internet video," has taken a cue from Pandora on how it delivers content to you. The new app, available only on iOS at launch, uses your personal interests to tailor a feed of videos, allowing users to employ swipe gestures to skip (left) or watch later (right) -- think of the latter option as a DVR of sorts.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Nokia Lumia 930 review: like the Icon, but better

Microsoft's acquisition of Nokia is now bearing fruit, but as often happens when big companies merge, there aren't enough jobs to go around. More than 10,000 former Nokia employees are due to be laid off by the end of the year, but their legacy will live on for a time in the Lumia 930: one of the last all-Nokia creations. If you live in the UK, then you already know where to get the flagship Windows Phone, but the more important question is whether you want one. We've already taken a deep dive on the 930 in our review of the Lumia Icon, which is essentially the same phone, just exclusive to Verizon in the US. Let's revisit the good, the bad and the competition.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

It's always a gamble for a company to attach itself to an artist. But Spotify sees it as a natural extension of its corporate culture. For a company that holds regular hackathons and hack weeks, in which employees are encouraged to experiment and step outside of the box, bringing in a resident artist just makes sense. Kyle McDonald, an adjunct professor at ITP, is kicking off the company's new Media Artist in Residence program (after hounding the company on Twitter) with Serendipity, a web app that shows when two people start playing the same song simultaneously. All the app does is tap into Spotify's API and look for when a song starts in two locations within 100ms of each other. Then it highlights them on a map that zooms in and out, and dances about. Shockingly, this happens at least 10 times a second! Kyle said that for the most popular songs up to 10 different people will queue them up at the exact same moment, but for the purposes of his experiment he stuck with only displaying two instances.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

How's the ticker? Some dangerous heart problems can exist without any symptoms whatsoever, like "atrial fibrillation" (A-fib) a type of abnormal cardiac rhythm that affects one in four people. A visit to your physician is normally required to detect it (and is still a must), but a company called AliveCor has just announced that its AFib Dector algorithms have been approved by the FDA for professional or personal use. It consists of the company's $199 heart monitor (also available in an integrated iPhone 5/5s case, shown above) which attaches to an Android or iOS smartphone and rests on your fingers or chest to record your electrocardiogram (ECG). It then sends the info to your smartphone via an ultrasonic signal which is picked up by your phone's microphone, requiring much less power than a Bluetooth system.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

With its latest L-series devices, LG is sticking to its script of building low-spec devices that retain some of the design cues, features and software of its higher-end handsets. Like earlier models, both the new L Fino and L Bello phones are aimed at emerging and youth markets with specs like 1.2GHz/1.3GHz quad-core CPUs, low-res WVGA screens, no LTE and 8-megapixel rear/1-megapixel front cameras (front VGA only for the Fino). Rather than specs though, LG is emphasizing the UX software features carried over from the G3 and other models.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

At $60 per year, an Xbox Live Gold subscription isn't cheap, but Microsoft's working to make the all-access package a bit more attractive to gamers. The 'Games with Gold' offering that we first saw with Xbox 360 made its way to One as well, and now it appears that the company's latest console may soon get a second bonus feature. Xbox One beta users noticed a new 'Free Game Day' option this week, which enables 24 hours of access to select titles, giving you a chance to preview games before making a purchase. Max: The Curse of Brotherhood appears to be the first offering, and if an Xbox Support tweet is any indication, a broader rollout may be on the way very soon.

0 Comments

Google Glass' Timothy Jordan at Engadget Expand New York 2013

Some of Google's rapid-fire Glass updates have been more useful than others, but its latest is something you're likely to appreciate -- especially if you're a socialite. The wearable's 20.1 upgrade gives you a much better contact system (shown below) that gives you quicker access to your friends. You can reach 20 of your favorited and recent contacts through voice, and your phone's entire address book is easily accessible. It's also much easier to switch communication methods. If you want to jump from email to Hangouts to deal with a heated conversation, you only have to swipe to make it happen.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

If traditional printers use ink and toner cartridges, most commercial 3D printers use plastic filament spools to create the objects you want. These filaments, however, are typically made from plastic pellets, so an Ohio company called Sculptify thought: "Hey, why don't we make a 3D printer that uses pellets straight up?" Thus, David, a 3D printer loaded with open source software, was born. David can print objects using a number of soft and flexible materials, such as Polylactide (PLA) and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), though it can surprisingly use wood, as well. Since pellets are usually much cheaper than filaments (according to Sculptify, a 2-pound bag of pellet costs around $18, while a 2.2-pound spool costs roughly $48), you'll be saving quite a bit of money.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

It's been tough times for Sony, and it's very much aware of it. While we hear all about the company cutting loose unsuccessful parts (whether it's PCs or e-readers), the other side of the coin is ensuring Sony can make another hit. Nikkei has done a deep dive (in Japanese and paywalled, unfortunately) on the electronics manufacturers' bid to drum up new business ideas. The next Walkman or the next PlayStation could well come from the New Business Creation department, first suggested by employee Shinji Odajima last April.

He was then appointed head of it. "There's still plenty of employees in Sony looking for a challenge." An initial meeting for new business idea 'auditions' was set to house 300 employees in June: over 800 turned up. Odajima has now received over 200 ideas -- though he's not sharing those with anyone just yet.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Must Reads