Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

Let's try something really quickly: pull your phone out, flip it over, and maybe squint at it a bit. Chances are you'll see a series of FCC-mandated pictograms emblazoned there, little images you've probably never paid attention to before. If US senators Deb Fischer (R-Nebraska) and Jay Rockefeller (D-W. Virginia) get their way though, those curious icons may soon become a thing of past. Instead, the pair wants to replace those etchings with more informative digital equivalents that users can peek at if they so chose. Alas, your gadgets might not be completely clean if the bill passes -- there are still those pesky CE labels to gaze upon.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

What should an astronaut do when he gets dirty? Take a meteor shower [groan]. But, what does an astronaut do when their space suit gets mucky in training? They get it laundered, just like anything else. Pictured above, a staff member from the Russian Space Training Center hangs out the freshly washed space suits of Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin, NASA's U.S. flight engineer Kathleen Rubins, and Japanese space agency's flight engineer Takuya Onishi. The trio picked up a few stains after landing on water in training for a mission on the ISS. So, the suits can handle the high radiation of space, but not a spin in a dryer?

[Image: Alexander Zemlianichenko / AP]

0 Comments

Slowly but surely, the iOS version of Google Maps is gaining parity with its Android equivalent. With the latest update, those who use Google's mapping application on Apple's mobile platform will be able to see search results along with their descriptions visually laid out on the map, as seen in the image above. You can toggle between the map view and just a regular list view as well. Additionally, Gmail users will find that appointments and reservations will show up on the map too, which is handy if you want to know how to get to that dinner meeting on time. Last but not least, there's also an improved Explore view that you can use to figure out what's nearby, just in case you'd like to follow up the meal with after-dinner drinks. So if you're an iOS user who prefers Google's own email and maps offerings over Apple's own, then you should download this update right about now.

0 Comments

Rear view of students with hands raised with a teacher in the classroom

The FCC is ready to start dolling out up to $2 billion dollars in grants to American schools to pay for WiFi networks, but it doesn't seem that anyone -- especially the schools -- are happy about it. The new rules under the aging E-Rate program, which is part of the Universal Service Fund, would set aside $1 billion dollars this year and another billion next year to set up WiFi networks in schools and public libraries. Chairman Tom Wheeler says the agency should be proud because, "10 million kids will be connected next year who otherwise wouldn't." But Republicans are concerned the program will favor urban areas, while failing to deliver much needed connectivity to rural schools. Of course, GOP lawmakers also steadfastly opposed increasing funding to the E-Rate, which had its budget capped at $2.25 billion 16 years ago and hasn't been adjusted since.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Leah Katz-Hernandez, right, , deaf Gallaudet students, shows

Over the last few years closed captions have become increasingly prevalent in online video, but now the FCC is pushing for providers to go even further. It's already a requirement for full-length video that originally aired on TV to come with captions when it's streamed online, but new rules approved today will extend that to clips from the videos as well. In a unanimous vote, commissioners put deadlines for compliance that vary on the type of clip being used. By January 1, 2016, "straight lift" clips that just pull one segment of a show will need captions, then in 2017 montages of compiled clips will need them and finally, by July 2017, clips of live and near-live programming will need captions (with a short grace period.) This won't apply to your garden variety YouTube channel however, these rules are for online streams from the broadcasters and cable/satellite providers that originally aired the video.

[Image credit: Washington Post/Getty Images]

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Microsoft MapPoint has been around a long time. How long? So long that a stock-image search pulled up this gem from 2005 -- a photo of "Streets & Trips" running on a Pocket PC. In fact, the mapping platform is even older than that: It was first created by a company called NextBase in 1988, which MIcrosoft later acquired in 1994. Incredibly, it's lived on, even long after people stopped storing maps on CD-ROMs. Finally, though, the software is going the way of the floppy disk: The company has discontinued MapPoint, Streets & Trips, and AutoRoute, with users encouraged to use Bing Maps instead. And, ya know, that kind of makes sense, considering CEO Satya Nadella only yesterday posted an open letter describing Microsoft as a mobile- and cloud first company. Somehow, knowing Engadget readers, we suspect this won't affect you much, but in the event that you do still use Streets & Trips, you'll continue to have support through at least July 2015. After that, you may need to get with the times.

Image credit: Associated Press

0 Comments

I still remember my old, favorite football like it was yesterday. It wasn't made by Nike, Adidas or even Diadora, but it lasted me for about seven years, from when I was 7 until about 14 or so. And even though, toward the end of its life, it started to look as if it had been living in a waste dumpster, never, ever did it let me down. Despite the battle scars collected over the years, like the faux-leather gradually falling off or needing to get pumped up every time before a game, that cheap, low-tech ball always did what it was supposed to: Be, well, a ball you could have fun with. In recent years, however, things have changed quite drastically. As technology evolves, sports balls continue to get smarter and smarter, with a great amount of research and development money being spent by manufacturers. Here's where Adidas' recently announced miCoach Smart Ball comes in.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Adobe has been making quite the heavy-handed push with its mobile apps as of late, and one of its older no-cost options just received a significant update. Photoshop Express for both Android and iOS tacked on blemish removal and defogging tools to further enhance edits on the go. There's also a new intensity control that allows you to tweak how much of those built-in presets are applied -- a feature similar to Instagram's recent add-on. Last but not least, the software can also import RAW files for editing purposes; however, it's unclear whether you're tweaking a smaller "thumbnail" version that remains tied to a desktop, as is the case in Lightroom mobile. At any rate, those files are uploaded through the free tier (unless you've committed funds) of Adobe Revel before syncing with the app. If those trusty mobile devices have yet to alert you to the update, both versions are available for download via their respective repositories.

0 Comments

With two Google-powered smartwatches currently on sale, and the circular Moto 360 already causing a stir among design geeks, wearables are one step closer to securing a place on our wrists. And while many of us aren't ready to strap on a Gear Live, G Watch or Pebble just yet, that doesn't mean the smartwatch is a new concept. In fact, depending on your definition of "smart," these gadgets have been fusing time-telling with extra functionality since the early 20th century. From wrist-borne spy cams to radio-controlled timepieces, here's a look at this wearable's evolution.

0 Comments

Latest Product ReviewsMore reviews →

Must Reads