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​Looking for a positive take to cut though all the negative press that Heartbleed has been getting? Then the Open Source Initiative (OSI) has one. The news has been full of stories about the exploit in OpenSSL (itself, an open-source project) that has caused a wave of panic around the internet. With much of the public not understanding what open-source is (it's complex, but mostly involves freedom to redistribute, and access to the code it's built on), and the fact that all this can be caused by a few lines of edited text, the integrity of open-source software has understandably come under scrutiny. We spoke with a representative from the OSI, and they gave us the positive spin we'd all been looking for.

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Last week at the NAB (National Association of Broadcasters) show, FCC head Tom Wheeler pushed broadcasters to loosen their grip on spectrum that the agency plans to auction off to give wireless internet room to grow. Now, he's laid out a draft of the rules for the auction before it takes places next year. The upcoming incentive auction will be a three stage process that, once completed, should open up more wireless spectrum for high-speed services like WiFi. WiFi operates on "unlicensed spectrum" that's open for anyone to use, and similar networks or devices could take advantage of any new frequencies the FCC opens up, while reducing interference with existing networks. That's good and bad however, since they'd fill the space in between networks, it could be harder to build up something like WiFi.

So far not everyone has been happy with the possible rules for this redistribution. That includes the broadcasters themselves, whose participation will have to happen voluntarily, and the companies expected to bid for access, namely AT&T who has warned that it might skip the process based on the FCC's restrictions on how much spectrum it can buy. Now that the rules are here, everyone from your local TV broadcaster to wireless carriers to cash heavy dreamers like Google and Dish Network can look them over before the commission votes on them May 15th.

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Sony Xperia Z2

It's been nearly three years since I reviewed the Xperia Neo, manufactured by what was then Sony Ericsson. The Neo represented just the second generation of Xperia phones running on Android, from a period when Sony was finding its feet in the world of mobile and still chucking out plenty of duds (I'm looking at you, Tablet P). Fast-forward to today and things have changed dramatically under Kaz Hirai's stewardship. I'll tell you this right now: The Z2 is an easy phone to recommend, at least for those living in countries where it'll definitely be available (a list that includes the UK and Canada, but not yet the US). The only real caveat is the handset's huge, monolithic construction (a far cry from puny, 126-gram Neo). As you'll see, if you can get past its size, the Z2 addresses some of the most serious gripes we had with its predecessors, the Xperia Z and Z1, particularly with respect to its LCD display. In fact, in some respects, it's far ahead of any other Android phone currently on the market.

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After last week's Very Special Episode, we've grabbed a Hair of the Dog (or two...or three), a bit of rest, and we're back for a regular ol' episode of The Engadget Podcast. We're discussing a triplet of topics that are assuredly close to your heart and head: the experimental and bizarre phones from Amazon and Google, and the hit security flaw that all the kids are raving about (Heartbleed). The show starts at 12PM ET sharp(ish), so grab your favorite plate of leftovers, a set of cans and a comfy seat. And tune in!

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BRD RedShift MX hybrid motorcycle

The US' special forces units frequently can't rely on conventional ground transportation for their covert ops -- a loud engine is guaranteed to blow their cover. To tackle this problem, DARPA has just awarded Logos Technologies a contract to build a stealthy hybrid motorcycle for the military. The design modifies BRD's all-electric RedShift MX (pictured here) with a quiet hybrid power system that can run on multiple fuel types. The overhaul lets soldiers travel long distances while keeping a relatively low profile, and they can run solely on electric power for shorter periods if silence is absolutely vital. It's too soon to say when the bike will go into service or just how well it will perform, but it could be a lifesaver for troops that need both speed and secrecy.

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A terminally ill woman has reminded us of the limitless potential for devices like the Oculus Rift beyond just gaming and entertainment. After Roberta Firstenberg's cancer treatments failed last year, she was told she had just a few months to live. That prompted her game artist granddaughter Priscilla ("Pri") to send a moving note to the Oculus Rift support team, who quickly decided to send a dev unit. Using the 3D headset, Roberta was able to experience mobility again with the Tuscany Villa demo, complete with virtual trees, stairs and butterflies. She was even able to see her younger self and a beloved, deceased pet via a fortuitous Google Street View snap -- which inspired another idea.

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Samsung Milk Music on a Galaxy Note 3

You know what they say about all good things in life. Samsung has been offering an ad-free version of its Milk Music service for no charge since launch, but the company has posted a new infographic revealing that Americans will soon have to pay $4 per month for a Premium tier to escape marketers. You'll also get some "exclusive features" as a bonus, although it's not clear just what they'll entail. We've reached out to learn more about both the paid service launch and what those perks will be. For now, you'll want to cherish the current listening experience -- it may not be around for much longer.

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You might remember NASA's LADEE as the satellite where the administration tested a new broadband-fast laser communication system for sending data back to Earth. Now, however, the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer is no more, since NASA just crashed the craft into the surface of the Moon. Unfortunately, the vehicle didn't have the power to maintain its orbit, so the bods in Florida decided to send the hardware on a one-way trip. On the upside, the satellite managed to grab some super-detailed scans of the lunar surface before burning up, and it probably looked really cool when it exploded, which probably justifies the wanton destruction of a multi-million dollar spacecraft.

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Matt's been steeped in old timey video over the past few days and it seems to have affected Dan's state of mind and podcast introduction. Once the anachronistic antics subside, the lads dig into the plausibility and potential for Google's Project Ara, a modular smartphone design that still has yet to prove its salt in the real world. On the mobile software side of things, BBC's iPlayer has finally embraced Android wholeheartedly and also wants to get viewers into a binging mood. Sky is also keen to get people consuming more content, but it's struggling with how to communicate its bundled packages to the masses. If you're looking for clarity of voice and intelligent banter, however, then you've probably come to the right place. Just pop on down to the streaming links below and you'll be whisked away into the wonderful world of the Engadget Eurocast. Enjoy!

Hosts: Dan Cooper, Matt Brian, Jamie Rigg

Producer: Jon Turi

Hear the Podcast:

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If a Windows Phone app disappoints you, it's probably right that you call out its failings and warn others to steer clear. Don't be surprised, however, if the minds behind the software start responding to your gripes directly. Microsoft is slowly rolling out a program whereby developers can comment on your reviews of their handiwork. Fortunately for you, however, the devs won't get access to your personal details, and, if they overstep the mark, you can report them for poor conduct. Still, the notion that coders will now get the chance to openly gain feedback from users seems like a step in the right direction -- just as long as everyone remains civil.

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