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A firm that builds environmental sensors is teaming up with Google to turn Street View cars into mobile pollution sniffers. Three of the search engine's mapping vehicles have been equipped with hardware to measure harmful compounds in the atmosphere including carbon monoxide, methane and VOCs. It's early days, but it's hoped that Google will be able to add this information to its maps, enabling people to see detailed air quality reports for their neighborhood. That way, you could plan your next jog to avoid trouble spots and authorities can visualize where they need to direct their clean-up efforts.

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Symbol Photo Computer Hard Drive With NSA Logo.

Three former US national security officials have given their support to end-to-end encryption and criticised claims that the government should have backdoor access or "duplicate" decryption keys. Mike McConnell, a former director of the National Security Agency and director of national intelligence, Michael Chertoff, a former homeland security secretary, and William Lynn, a former deputy defense secretary voiced their approval in the Washington Post. The trio argue that requiring companies to produce duplicate keys would only increase the risk of cyberattack. In short, the location or holder of the duplicate keys would simply create another potential point of vulnerability and attract hackers.

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It might have the number two in its name, but don't be fooled: the new Angry Birds game is just the latest in a seemingly endless trickle of apps featuring Rovio's feathered friends. We've seen Angry Birds interpretations of Star Wars, Transformers and even Mario Kart -- but today the company is back with "the first sequel" to the original. You're still flinging colorful birds at pigs, but the gameplay has been tweaked with new multi-stage levels, spells and boss piggie battles. Rovio has been having a tough time of late, so it's no doubt hoping that this app is the one to recapture the first game's runaway success.

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Live fire demostration

Officials in California's San Bernardino County are tired of drones grounding their airborne firefighting efforts, that's why they've decided to take action. They're now offering a total of $75,000 in rewards to catch the pilots who flew their UAVs over three different forest fires -- they're allotting $25,000 in rewards for each one -- that took place these past months. During the latest one, which happened this mid-July, aerial firefighters reportedly came across five hobby drones flying over the affected areas that ultimately forced them to land. The 20-minute delay those drones caused was apparently enough for the flames to spread to the Interstate 15 freeway, burning cars in the process.

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Graphene's looking more and more like an all-around wonder material that can be used to make armor tougher than kevlar, thin light bulbs, long-lasting batteries and even high-tech tattoos. Now, a team of Cornell physicists have discovered that they can make kirigami out of 10-micron sheets (a hair strand's 70-micron-thick, for comparison) of graphene, as well. Kirigami is the art of cutting out designs on a single piece of paper like in the image above. The ones made by the Cornell team are much, much smaller -- they're quite literally nanoscale versions of what you see above -- but since they're made of the wondrous one-atom-thick material, they're also incredibly strong.

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Amazon has announced that it's signed a deal with ousted Top Gear presenters Jeremy Clarkson, James May and Richard Hammond for a new motoring show. The stars of the popular BBC franchise left the program earlier this year when Clarkson was fired as a consequence of punching a producer. Almost instantly, rumors of the trio launching a rival with another broadcaster spread, with Netflix the surprise front-runner.

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The situation with Dead Island 2 and developer Yager took another turn today as the company announced it's filing for insolvency. Yager Productions, the team formed to work on the zombie sequel, can't pay the money it owes to debtors. "At the moment, there are different options to be assessed while wages for employees have been secured for the upcoming months," a company statement reads. The filing is a direct result of being removed from Dead Island 2's development, managing director Timo Ullmann writes. Insolvency helps protect the company's staff and will allow "time to sort out the best options for reogranizing this entity," he says. The rest of Yager, including the team working on the sci-fi, ship-to-ship combat game Dreadnought are in the clear however and are "independent and remain unaffected" by today's news.

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Google Play Ad

While advertising still forms the bulk of Google's revenue, the company continuously experiments with different ways of serving ads to ensure people keep spending. Even after it realized that full-screen "interstitial" placements were turning smartphone users away, the search giant still believes mobile ads are the future, so it's followed through with its intention to bring sponsored listings to the Play Store.

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Sony is actually doing all right despite a lot of turmoil, and it's got the PlayStation 4 to thank. This quarter, the company moved 3 million PS4s, bringing total sales of the console to 25.3 million units. Peripheral and software shipments also went up, boosting gaming revenue by 12.1 percent over last year. Despite lower PS3 sales, the division still hit 288.6 billion yen ($2.3 billion) and made around $160 million. Sony recently said that the PS4 is outselling the Xbox One in most of Europe by nearly double, and has outsold its rival considerably overall. It originally expected to sell 16 million PS4s in 2015, but has now bumped that forecast to 16.5 million.

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If you're tired of having to pause games on your Android mobile device just to wipe finger grease off the screen, you are in luck. For $80, the Bluetooth-connected Razer Serval gamepad will ensure that you never touch that screen again (at least until playtime is over). Razer initially announced the Serval back at CES in January but it has finally hits Google Play's virtual store shelves.

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AT&T Store, AT and T in unusual Mission Style Craftsman Building, AT&T Sign logo Pics by Mike Mozart of TheToyChannel and Jeeper

AT&T refuses to pay the FCC the $100 million fine it got slapped with, claiming that it didn't keep data throttling a secret from its subscribers at all. Ma Bell was given with such a hefty penalty, because the agency determined that it slowed down subscribers' "unlimited" internet connections after they've used a particular amount of data without letting them know. The company is now denying that: in its filing to dismiss the $100 million fine, AT&T wrote that it posted a disclosure about throttling data speeds online and even texted a notification to unlimited data customers.

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Dropsy, a new game from publisher Devolver Digital, is a pixelated acid trip disguised as a point-and-click adventure. It's stars a bald, nearly toothless clown covered in thick white face paint, bright red lipstick, too-small suspenders and high-water pants, who wanders around giving people hugs and going on adventures. It's a non-linear game emphasizing exploration and bright, oozing colors. Yeah, terrifying.

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Canon is already competing with the Arri Alexa and Red cameras of the world, but it's about to take this one step further. Meet the ME20F-SH, a high-end video shooter that features a sleek, subtle and somewhat compact design. Most importantly, Canon's new camera can deliver an ISO equivalent of more than 4 million, instantly making it a prime option for people who need to capture footage in super-dark settings -- like a moonless night sky. The company believes its ME20F-SH is also great for production companies making films, reality television and documentaries. However, there are some limitations here. It only does 1080p, for one, which doesn't bode well in terms of being future-proof -- Canon says that had to be done to "achieve the highest possible low-light sensitivity," which would otherwise be reduced if it went with a higher resolution and, consequently, smaller photosites.

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Samsung's earlier prediction for the second quarter of 2015 was spot on: the company has failed to hit its goals when it comes to the sales of its flagship devices. Its operating profits fell four percent to 6.9 trillion won ($5.9 billion), and the mobile division's, in particular, slid to 2.76 trillion won ($2.4 billion) from 4.42 trillion won ($3.8 billion) from the same quarter last year. While those profit numbers are still three percent higher than the last, it's going to be tough to play catch up this second half of 2015, as Apple's slated to reveal its new iPhones -- its main rival in the world of high-end smartphones. In order to combat the expected sales drop, Samsung is "adjusting" (read: dropping) the prices of both the Galaxy S6 and the S6 Edge. It's already planning to introduce new premium smartphones: the company has already teased an event for August 13th, where it's likely to introduce a new Galaxy Note and a larger S6 Edge.

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TrackingPoint's computer-augmented rifle sights, better known as the ShotView targeting system, have set off a wave of controversy and debate since they first debuted in 2014. That debate is about to get even hotter now that security researchers Runa Sandvik and Michael Auger have shown Wired a way to break into the rifle and shut it down or, even worse, change the target to the hacker's choosing.

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Volkswagen's adaptive cruise control

You normally have to spring for higher-end cars to get semi-autonomous features that could save your hide, but Volkswagen is aiming to make them relatively commonplace. The automaker has started shipping its 2016 model line, and most of it will at least make crash avoidance features an option, if not include it as a matter of course. The majority of Golf, Jetta and Touareg models will have the choice of smart cruise control and emergency braking technology that could keep you out of an accident even if you can't react in time; they're standard on Executive trim levels for the CC and Touareg. You'll also find a lane departure system on the CC, Golf, and Touareg, and parking assistance on the Golf.

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Engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center have completed the second phase of a project that aims to improve the reliability of Emergency Location Transmitters (ELTs). These devices are meant to send your coordinates to emergency responders after a plane crash but are often so damaged by the impact that they don't ever turn on. That's why NASA is working with its industry partners to design an ELT system capable of taking a punch without getting knocked out.

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Before you ask: No, it doesn't have an adorably perfect food pun for a name. Severed, the next stylish game from Guacamelee studio DrinkBox, won't launch in the summer as planned. The game needs "a few additional months," though the alpha version will definitely be done in a few days. DrinkBox is taking the extra time to go all-in on "play-testing and tuning," the studio says. "We also need sufficient time to add more memes and dumb jokes." In that case, please take all the time you need, DrinkBox.

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Google's Nexus 6

If you've ever wondered why Uber will show you a horde of available cars but still quote you an oddly long wait time for a ride, you now have an explanation: some of those cars don't exist. Motherboard has learned through a study that the app's map activity doesn't correlate that well with reality, even in those areas where you simply can't get a lift. Why? That depends on who you ask. A spokesperson insists that the number and location of cars is "generally accurate," but the company's help staff disagree. One claims that it's a glitch stemming from map zooming, while another says that the cars are purely there for a "visual effect" that indicates the presence of cars looking for fares.

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