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Amazon Fire TV gamepad

Amazon's Fire TV devices may be focused primarily on Android games, but they can now do some PC gaming in a pinch. The media hubs have just scored an exclusive GameFly app that streams a mix of PC titles (such as the Batman series and Dirt 3) in subscription-based game packs starting at $7 a month. Suffice it to say you'll want to snag a gamepad if you're going to use this feature at all. No, this probably won't make you forget about dedicated consoles or NVIDIA's Shield, but it's a big deal if the Fire TV is your only living room game machine.

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As we heard from Intel at its Computex keynote, the merger between A4WP (Alliance for Wireless Power) and PMA (Power Matters Alliance) is finally a signed deal as of today, which is a big step towards delivering the next-generation wireless power -- one that can transmit further while also covering a wider range of wattage -- to consumers. Intel's SVP Kirk Skaugen, the very same man who's been pushing for the totally wireless PC since last year's Computex (the photo sort of explains why), added that we'll be seeing this magnetic resonance technology aka Rezence being integrated into next year's laptops, keyboard, mice and other devices. For those who can't wait, the exec also expects to see Rezence-enabled add-ons for mobile devices during the transitional period. "This will be a journey just like Centrino: we didn't invent wireless notebooks; we just made wireless ubiquitous."

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NASA tests the RS-25 rocket at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi

If you thought NASA's recent booster rocket test for the Space Launch System was full of sound and fury, just wait until you see what happens with the main engines. The agency recently conducted a nearly 8-minute burn test for the RS-25 rocket providing the SLS' core thrust, and the machinery isn't exactly subtle -- as you'll see in the video below, it produced a gigantic steam cloud that seemingly dwarfed the complex. Of course, this dry run wasn't really for show. NASA needed to prove that the RS-25's automated propulsion (which adjusts things like fuel mixture based on throttle demands) will work without a hitch when it's lifting payloads destined for places like Mars. And it's important to note that this is just one of four primary rockets in the SLS. When the finished rocket launches in 2018, it'll put out a fierce 1.6 million pounds of thrust that could make this demo seem timid by comparison.

[Image credit: NASA]

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A team of scientists wants to quickly drive down the cost of renewable energy to the point that it's cheaper than coal within ten years' time. In order to do that, though, they need money -- lots and lots of money to the tune of $150 billion. That's why they founded the Global Apollo Programme, named as such because (in the words of one of the founders, Richard Layard of the London School of Economics ) "The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon." The researchers envision the program as a collaboration between several nations, funding research that will make renewable energy a much more feasible option.

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The Xbox and PlayStation booths at E3 2014

If you've ever followed the Electronic Entertainment Expo (aka E3) closely, you know that there are a lot of events taking place in a short space of time: press conferences, live booth presentations and legions of game premieres. How in the world are you supposed to watch it all? We'll be on the ground, of course, but YouTube wants to help as well. It's launching an E3 2015 hub that will stream "all" the big press conferences (such as Microsoft, Sony, EA and Ubisoft), the Nintendo World Championships, loads of booth events and first-time "let's play" sessions. YouTube might not have the same lock on live game steaming that Twitch does, but it could get a lot of your attention when E3 kicks off in mid-June.

[Image credit: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong]

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Where to begin? Would you like to make your own PiRate radio station or Pi Microwave? Does a techno upgrade to your Fisher Price Chatter Telephone sound like fun? You can do all this and more with a credit-card-sized Raspberry Pi 2 Model B at the heart of your project. Element14 has been supporting the professional and hobbyist electronics community for years by hosting online groups and supplying some of the requisite gear. It's shipped a few million of the Raspberry Pi since its 2012 release and to celebrate the second iteration, the company gave us a hefty starter kit -- Ben Heck can't have all the fun. This time around, the Pi is six times faster, has double the memory capacity and if you've already been hacking away with an earlier version, don't fret, its backwards compatible, too. There's a host of partner products from sensors to NFC to WiFi modules available from Element14 and this week's giveaway includes 15 of those alongside the new Raspberry Pi 2 Model B for one lucky Engadget reader. You know the drill, just head down to the Rafflecopter widget for up to three chances at winning.

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Acer DiaperPie powerd by Intel Edison

Ever since the introduction of the Edison, Intel's been actively pitching this tiny computer module to makers by way of workshops and hackathons. At Computex, the chip giant took the opportunity to show off the latest round of hacks based on its $50 kit, and we were amused by one particular demo: the DiaperPie*, a smart diaper solution created by four Acer engineers. The module -- which will be the size of a coin if Acer commercializes it -- sits inside a regular diaper and is able to monitor a baby's temperature plus sleeping posture, as well as detecting the presence of pee (moisture) and poo (methane) in the diaper. The data is logged on both the app (via Bluetooth LE) and the cloud, and if the baby needs attention, you'll get a notification. Given that we haven't heard much about the previous smart diaper attempt, it'd be cool to see Acer realizing this project.

*Ted plush not included.

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C1YC8B A GameStop video game store in the Herald Square shopping district in New York gamestop; videogames; shopping; electronic

There was a hushed silence as the Priest shouted "should anyone have an objection to the marriage of ThinkGeek and Hot Topic, speak now or forever hold their peace." Suddenly, a side-door slammed open as GameStop rushed in, demanding that the ceremony stop, because it alone was ThinkGeek's one true love. Hot Topic blanched as ThinkGeek struggled to make eye contact, before nodding in agreement, apologizing and bolting from the altar. As ThinkGeek and GameStop ran down the aisle, arm in arm, the online retailer knew that it had done the right thing because, after all, GameStop had loads more money.

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I was supposed to review the Apple Watch. That was the plan, but then, when Engadget had its first chance to test the device, I was on vacation. Specifically, I was in France, where I ran the Paris Marathon, my sixth 26.2-mile race in five years. As it happens, our Editor-in-Chief Michael wrote a fair, thorough review on his own, and he cut a fine figure in that stop-motion walkthrough video, too. If there's one thing he didn't go into detail on, though, it was the Apple Watch's performance as a fitness device. Some background there: Michael is one of those naturally skinny people with a stupidly fast metabolism who doesn't need to work out to stay trim. Which is a good thing, because he hates working out. That's why, when I finally had the chance to try out the Apple Watch myself (a $649 stainless steel model), I chose to focus on its abilities as a fitness gadget -- a fitting decision, considering my running habit was what kept me from reviewing the watch in the first place.

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