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Microsoft has been rather generous with free OneDrive storage lately, and that doesn't seem to be changing anytime soon. Now Redmond is bumping the previous gratis 15GB up by 100 percent, to 30GB. What's the catch? There isn't much of one, really. All Redmond says you have to do (regardless of if you're a new user or seasoned veteran) is activate auto-upload on your device of choice's camera roll between now and the end of the month -- even on a Windows PC. Seems simple enough. The announcement focuses on the storage woes that've been associated with upgrading to iOS 8, and given the iPhone 6 Plus' fancy video tricks like HD time-lapse capture we'd imagine the off-device storage should come in pretty handy.

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Oculus VR's DK1 headset

If you've ever wanted to modify a virtual reality headset (or even create one from scratch), Oculus VR just gave you a big head start on your project. The Facebook-owned firm has opened up the code, mechanical elements and design for its first VR wearable, the Oculus Rift DK1. Provided you have the know-how and tools, you can now build upon everything Oculus learned in its early days about screens, head tracking and ergonomics. The source material won't help you recreate the more advanced technology of newer Rift kits or the Gear VR, but it should be worth a look if you're curious about the inner workings of immersive displays.

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Presence. It's the ability of VR headsets to fool your mind and body into thinking that you are actually in a virtual world, and that experience is what Oculus seeks to deliver with its latest prototype. Codenamed Crescent Bay, it's an evolution of the DK2 headset that only recently started making its way into the hands of developers. I got to try out the new hardware today at Oculus Connect, the company's inaugural developer conference. Come live vicariously through me, dear reader, as I tell you how it went.

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This week, we reviewed Apple's new large-screened iPhones, investigated Microsoft's investment in Minecraft, whipped up some magical butter, learned about Google's new budget handset initiative called Android One and more. Read on for Engadget's news highlights from the last seven days. Oh, and be sure to subscribe to our Flipboard magazine!

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When we saw the Samsung Gear VR at IFA, Oculus CTO John Carmack showed us a basic version of an app store made for mobile virtual reality. But when the headset ships to consumers sometime later this year, the VR outfit has bigger plans. It's rebranding the current Oculus Share "store" into Oculus Platform and turning it into a launcher of sorts for apps and other experiences, as noticed by TechCrunch. Platform will act as common store across the firm's entire platform including the Rift and mobile. Like the prototype from earlier this month, the store will exist within virtual reality and will house games, apps and stuff like the virtual movie theater, Oculus Cinema.

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Xbox One

Bad news if you were hoping to pick up an Xbox One in Beijing next week: Microsoft has just delayed the game system's launch in China from September 23rd to sometime before the end of the year. The company isn't saying just what prompted the last-minute pushback, but it claims that it needs extra time to offer "first rate gaming and entertainment experiences" -- in short, something is still pretty rough around the edges. Whatever the reasons, Chinese gamers will have to wait a little while longer to get their first major console since the country lifted its years-long ban on fun-minded machines like this.

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Oculus VR has a new headset. CEO Brendan Iribe showed the prototype, dubbed Crescent Bay, off today at the first Oculus Connect conference. It has built-in audio, it's lighter and packs 360-degree motion tracking. Iribe says that the jump between the new prototype and the previous developer kit (DK) is as dramatic as the jump between DK1 and the recently shipped DK2. Of course, it has a higher resolution screen and refresh rate, but the focus on this version though, seems to be audio. The headset sports onboard headphones that apparently can be removed if you'd rather use your own, and custom audio software (with help from the University of Maryland's RealSpace3D tech) to make "presence" much more convincing. "We're working on audio as aggressively as we're working on the vision side," Iribe said. Which makes sense, considering that sound is at least half of the experience for most entertainment.

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Aether's Cone speaker is a fresh spin on music streaming

The first HiFi I had all to myself was a hand-me-down Sony music center (something like this). It was a mix of faux-wood panels and brushed metal, with three media options: cassette, vinyl and radio. Then the '90s mainstay "all-in-one" HiFi (and CD!) became my main music hub for many years. These days, it's a very different game. If you're not running a networked system, connected to your favorite streaming services, then, frankly, you're doing it wrong. But, what if you don't want an all-encompassing solution from the likes of Sonos or Bang & Olufsen? You could go with Bluetooth speakers, but that's a whole different proposition altogether (and a bit of a minefield). Then there's the Cone by Aether. It's portable, networked and works with streaming services. At $400 (the same price as Sonos' Play:5 speaker), it's going to have to have a few tricks up it's sleeve to lure in potential buyers. I have a fairly large gap in my music room though -- can this fill it?

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Dell Streak

It's safe to say that Steve Jobs was off the mark when he declared that no one would buy big smartphones -- they've become popular enough that Apple itself is now making large iPhones. But how did these supersized devices escape their niche status to become the must-haves they are today? The transformation didn't happen overnight. It took a succession of ever-bigger phones to spark the public imagination and prove that huge screens were here to stay. We've rounded up 10 of the most important examples -- head on over to our gallery to see how enormous became the new normal.

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When Verizon launched its "Advanced Calling 1.0" feature earlier this month (read: voice over LTE), it only worked with two phones: The Samsung Galaxy S5 and the LG G2. Now the company can add the iPhone to that list, well, at least the iPhone 6. Verizon customers who upgraded to Cupertino's latest handset are reporting that VoLTE is working on both the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. A user on the MacRumors forum said he had to activate the feature in his phone's cellular menu first, but afterwards was able to make calls freely. It's also notable that he called a landline -- previously, the feature was only said to work between compatible Verizon phones. Is it working for you? Fire up your new handset (if you're into that brand), and let us know in the comments.

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