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If you're heading to either music festival this year, you can leave that selfie stick behind. Both April's Coachella and Lollapalooza in July have added the rods to their prohibited item lists. At Lollapalooza, the rules stipulate no "GoPro attachments like sticks, selfie sticks & monopods." Coachella said that "Selfie sticks / narsisstics" won't allowed in, showing a healthy lack of self-awareness... and spelling skill.

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We get it, you're a busy person. Game-broadcasting outfit Twitch understands too, which is why it's brought some new features to its mobile apps. In a move that benefits everyone (assuming that "everyone" means Android and iOS users, exclusively), the application's getting a persistent player window. That means you can fire up a stream, have it play and look for another that might suit your fancy more all at once. Not a fan of what's playing? One swipe and it's gone. Yup, it's a lot like how YouTube's mobile apps work. And speaking of Google, fans of its mobile OS with newer devices have a feature to call their own (for now): audio only mode. This allows you to listen to just the commentary from your favorite broadcasters while the app runs in the background or if your screen is locked, controlling everything via system notifications -- no foolin'.

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Having all of human knowledge readily available on the internet has convinced people that they know a lot more than they actually do, according to a recent Yale study. For their recently published report in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, a pair of psychologists conducted multiple 1000-participant experiments. They found that participants who used the internet to research a subject were more likely to think that they also knew about a second, unrelated topic. Basically, if you look up subject A with the internet, you're more likely than offline researchers to think you also know about subject B -- even if you haven't actually looked anything up. In general, internet users believed themselves to be brighter and more clever than the other participants in the study.

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littleBits and Korg first teamed up on a kit for aspiring musicians back in 2013, and now the duo is at it again. This time around, the two companies collaborated on MIDI, CV and USB I/O modules, adding to the existing Lego-like DIY audio collection. With the MIDI module, you can control the Synth Kit from a compatible instrument (like Korg's MS-20 mini), or use a littleBits setup to wrangle sounds from gear and software, too. Connecting the USB I/O module adds a way to capture your homemade instrument with recording software (DAW). And as you might expect, it'll allow littleBits controllers, sequencers and effects to tweak any audio coming from a computer.

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Microsoft admits its upcoming Music and Video apps for PC, which both drop the Xbox branding, aren't polished enough to replace current ones just yet. But if you're already testing Windows 10 through Technical Preview, you can now also take the platform's next-gen media apps for a spin. The Music Preview app can play and browse songs saved on your device and on OneDrive. Despite not having Xbox in its official name anymore, the app can still play any file you added via Xbox Music Pass. Unfortunately, the gallery's still wonky, and Music Pass files are prone to errors. In the near future, though, the tech corporation wants to add right-click menus and the capability to buy from Windows Store Beta, among other features.

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A protest over Facebook's privacy

If Facebook thought it had a lot of privacy-related legal trouble on its plate, it hasn't seen anything yet. Researchers commissioned by Belgium's data protection agency have determined that Facebook's latest web tracking policy violates European Union privacy law. Reportedly, the social network uses cookies to track web visitors without permission, whether or not they log in or take advantage of the EU's proposed opt-out rules. Cookies are only supposed to be used when you're signed in, and only for things you've agreed to. The kicker? The opt-out system that Facebook uses appears to put another tracking cookie on your system if you're in the EU, so you never completely escape.

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Futuristic innovation - artificial arm

The ability to control prosthetics with only the power of your mind has been around for a while, but it typically requires control electronics implanted directly into the patient. With this new, non-invasive method developed at the University of Houston, however, amputees can command their robotic limbs without surgery. Instead of implants, the UH system uses a wearable "thinking cap" (aka an EEG) that monitors brain activity externally through the scalp. A brain-machine interface (BMI) then interprets these brain waves and converts that intention into mechanical motion. Basically, the patient thinks about picking up an object, the BMI recognizes the intention and then tells an attached prosthetic to do so. Even at this early stage of development, University of Houston researchers have gotten the system to work properly 80 percent of the time.

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There are plenty of to-do list options out there, ready to equip your phone with software to help you meet deadlines. Todoist is one of those, and the iOS version of the app just got a massive redesign. First, instead of typing in an item, and then having to tap a few more menus to assign a due date or tack onto a project, composing all of that info in the text box will automatically complete the necessary tags. The app inputs the date and makes sure that the item appears in the correct project. Not only is it handy, but it'll surely save you some time. There's also a button at the bottom right of each project screen for quickly adding new tasks. Need that reminder in a specific spot? Pull two existing items apart and you'll be able to add it right where you need it.

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Amazon Kindle in white

Have you missed white Kindle e-readers ever since they disappeared in 2012? So has Amazon. The internet retailer has quietly unveiled a white version of its basic Kindle reader that's headed to at least China on April 8th, and Japan on April 20th. It's virtually identical to the $79 black model, including the 800 x 600 e-paper touchscreen, WiFi and 4GB of storage -- you're really just getting a cosmetic change here. Still, it's hard not to be curious about Amazon's sudden nostalgia kick. We've reached out to Amazon to find out if and when the white Kindle will reach other parts of the globe, and we'll let you know if there are any additional launches in the cards.

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TED Talks on Chromecast

Interested in watching thought-provoking discussions, music videos and college sports on your TV through a Chromecast stick? You're covered as of today. Google has announced that the mobile apps for MTV, Pac-12 sports, TED Talks and Qello Concerts now have Chromecast support, so you can check out that inspirational presentation on the big screen without buying a set-top box or connecting your PC. This isn't the most significant thing that Google is putting on your TV today, but it'll mean a lot if your phone regularly doubles as a media hub.

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