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After decades pf theories and attempts to solve the mystery of Death Valley's sailing stones, a trio of scientists have finally caught the process on tape. Their study started years ago, when two of them (a biologist and an engineer) hauled 15 GPS-equipped rocks onto Racetrack Playa, the dry lake where the famous stones are found. It wasn't until 2013, when a planetary scientist made their two-man band a trio, that they hit the jackpot, though. Apparently, it takes a precise combination of water, ice and wind for the rocks to move. First, the water that floods the lake (which happens rarely) should be around 3 inches deep, so when it freezes, it forms thin, windowpane-like ice sheets beneath the rocks. Then, it should be sunny the day after that in order for the ice to crack, be blown by 10mph winds and propel the rocks forward.

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When companies tease a product, there's sometimes a subtle clue or two hidden within the video or images. Sometimes, however, a company can reveal too much, and Dyson's "Project N223" certainly seems to hint, pretty strongly, that we're going to see a Roomba-style vacuum cleaner. After all, there's plenty of clues in the video, some obvious, some less so. Given that we had a fair chunk of free time, we decided to go deep, so if you'd like to see some Zapruder-level analysis, click through to the gallery.

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Thrift stores: better known for dusty shirts, potential Halloween costumes and used Jenga sets. Well, Goodwill wants to change that a bit with its recent launch of The Grid, a dedicated electronics and video game specialty shop located in North Carolina. The outfit tells IGN that not only will it sell video game hardware itself, but it's arranged a deal with vendors to supply each console (even retro units) with new power and A/V cables -- stuff that can often be a bear to source. Oh, and there's Raspberry Pi and a selection of flat-screens on offer too. But what if console gaming isn't your bag? The Grid also sells laptops and gaming PCs, and, as the video below shows, even has an Oculus Rift demo station set up.

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Earlier this year, Amazon said that its 2014 original series lineup would be shot and eventually streamed in 4K to Samsung UltraHD TVs, and now we know when -- sometime this October. It was Samsung that actually revealed the date, saying it would support Amazon's Prime Instant Video UHD streaming on most Samsung 4K TVs. There's no word if Amazon's 4K service will hit other manufacturer's UltraHD models, but Samsung noted it has also expanded 4K content in Europe to Netflix, Wuaki.tv, Chili and Maxdome. Like Sony, Samsung has other plans to make sure you're not wasting all those pixels, as well. It recently did a live 4K stream of a Placido Domingo opera in Europe and released a 500GB drive with 40 recent 4K movies and documentaries.

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Here's a noodle-scratcher to occupy yourself with for a few moments: what makes a sheep dog so darned good at rounding up the woolly ruminants they're named after? A possible answer - according to The Telegraph, researchers at Swansea University believe those dogs are constantly searching for and minimizing the gaps between the sheep before it herds them all forward. What's the big deal? Well, those very same researchers think that behavior can be boiled down into an algorithm that could be used to (among other things) program robots to replace those savvy canines. Sure, some old-school shepherds may scoff, but using awkward-looking machines to round up livestock isn't exactly new territory. And if a robot can "understand" how to steer some relatively dumb animals around a field, it stands to reason that logic could be used to guide other organisms around... like humans trying to escape a burning building, for instance. No, really! Swansea University's Dr. Andrew King says there's a whole host of ways to adapt that animal knowledge into robotic know-how, like "crowd control, cleaning up the environment, herding of livestock, [and] keeping animals away from sensitive areas".

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Your souped-up table tennis setup for Saturday night beer pong sessions would tremble in shame in the presence of Stiga's new Studio table if it could. This is one fancy table, you see, with its own 2,800W sound system that features eight 6 x 9 speakers, subwoofers, an amplifier and Bluetooth connectivity so you can blast songs about owning a dozen Lamborghinis and making money rain from your phone or tablet. It even has LED lighting and mic input for those days you want to go all out hosting parties. Crazy, right?

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Want to make sure your newborn baby's jaundice-free? There's an app for that! A team of researchers from the University of Washington have developed an app that can diagnose jaundice among infants just by taking their pictures. Since the condition's typically diagnosed by the excessive yellowing of one's skin, it's not too odd to develop a tool that can detect it with just a snapshot, just like that app that can spot skin cancer through a smartphone. You simply place a color calibration card (which helps the software determine lighting and flash conditions, as well as account for the baby's skintone) on the baby's tummy, take a picture and then upload it to the cloud for analysis. The algorithm quickly does its job, and you get the results and the baby's bilirubin levels almost instantly.

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Schrodinger's cat, the good ole thought experiment that's been twisting (non-Quantum physicist) brains for decades. Scientists might have just caught it. Or not. Typical. What you see above is a combined image where a stencil was bombarded with cosmic rays photons, but the photons that generated the image actually never interacted with the stencil -- stay with us. It was separate photons (which shared the same quantum state as the ones that hit the camera) which arrived at the stencil. The science goes that when two separate particles are entangled, their physical properties appear to correlate and they share a single quantum state.

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Envious of Android's stream-wrangling AllCast app, but not ready to switch mobile platforms? You're in luck: the app's creator just teased the iOS version of the app on his Google+ page. A pair of screenshots (featured above) shows the work-in-progress, punctuated only with developer Koushik Dutta's brief commentary: "Slowly but surely." The port was apparently sparked by a handful of new iOS8 APIs that it possible to cast from other apps besides AllCast. So, when will it be here? Dutta says he hopes to release the app in a few weeks, possibly the end of September.

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Surgeons and medical assistant wearing mask and uniform operating patient.?

For all the advancements we've made with technology and medicine, a cure for cancer still eludes us. But maybe that's because we haven't enlisted nanoparticles to attack tumors just yet. New research from the University of California's Davis Cancer Center, spotted by PhysOrg, suggest that could be a reality sometime soon. By attaching a tumor-recognition module to a nanorobot, doctors would be able to both diagnose a cancerous growth and inject drugs directly into the carcinoma. This would effectively target only the malignant cells and leave the surrounding areas unharmed -- taking things a few steps further than, say, the nanodiamonds we've heard of. It's a stark contrast to how chemotherapy treatment typically works, too, which is a blanket attack on all of a certain type of cell that often inflicts as much collateral damage as it does good. Who knows, a world where cancer patients don't have their hair or bone marrow destroyed during treatment might not be too far off after all.

[Image credit: Shutterstock / StockLite]

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