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Sure, we know Oculus VR chief technology officer John Carmack's likes watching movies on the Rift headset from bed when he's sick, but what if you'd rather catch up on Orange is the New Black instead? A recent hackathon at Netflix produced something that could make that possible. The custom UI, dubbed "Oculix," shows off what it'd be like to navigate the interface in a virtual space replete with gesture control. It looks pretty neat if you ask us. What, with its floating tiles and text descriptions and all that. Sadly, unlike the home-brew Oculus apps we're used to, whether or not the greater community will get to give this a shot is up in the air. As is typical with Netflix's Hack Day projects, the outfit is making no promises of Oculix ever seeing the light of day.

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Movie theater texters here in the US are (rightfully!) viewed as the lowest of the low, but certain spots in China look far more kindly on those cinematic simpletons. Why? Because some of their hastily composed missives actually become part of the show itself. According to the New York Times, some Chinese theaters are experimenting with what they call "bullet screens," which meld movies with text messages sent in from the audience. For the low, low price of 0.1 renminbi (or a dime), a film connoisseur can watch as their most poignant wisecracks scroll across the screen with countless others... for better or worse.

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While EVs like the Tesla Model S and Renovo Coupe gain steam here on the ground, engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center are taking electric propulsion technology to new heights. What you see above is the GL-10 -- AKA Greased Lightning. This serious looking unmanned aerial system has a 10-foot wingspan and is powered by 10 individual electric motors with enough torque to propel it straight up in the air like a Harrier Jet. The GL-10 is nowhere near the size or weight of a Boeing V-22 Osprey, but that sort of maneuver is nonetheless impressive for a battery-powered machine.

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will never stop us

While sites like The Pirate Bay are busy improving the experience for the torrent-loving crowd, Google's facing the task of processing an extreme amount of removal request for pirate links. According to a recent transparency report on the matter, Google is now seeing more than 1 million DMCA takedown notices per day. In the previous week alone, for instance, the tech giant was asked to remove about 8 million results from its search engine. As TorrentFreak points out, the amount of copyright removal notices sent to Google has seen a tremendous spike in recent times -- it wasn't long ago that the number of takedown requests was in the low-hundreds for the entire year. With the growth of the internet as a whole, however, it's easy to see how that's come to be. You can peruse the report in full here, if you're into that sort of thing.

[Image credit: will never stop us/Flickr ]

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Boston Red Sox v St. Louis Cardinals

With MLB.tv, Major League Baseball's subscription-based streaming option, your local team's home games are blacked out due to TV and/or cable deals. That could change as early as next season though, as Bob Bowman, the league's head of Advanced Media, expects a revised online viewing agreement soon with broadcasters and teams. Networks pay millions for the rights to beam the action into living rooms, so we'd surmise there's quite a sum of money to discuss. When the restrictions are lifted, you'll likely need a cable plan to access those games -- just like FOX required for the All-Star Game this summer and ESPN does for its streaming option.

[Photo credit: Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images]

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Fish Play Street Fighter

The bar has been raised for fish-controlled video games. Not content with the solo action of Fish Plays Pokemon, Andrew Hill has launched FishPlayStreetFighter, a Twitch stream that lets you watch two fish (Aquarius and Robert the Bruce) square off in Capcom's classic Street Fighter II. It's mapping movement around the tank like before, but it's using a significantly more advanced control scheme to liven things up. Color detection makes the two-player mode possible, and the fish can string together input combos based on where they're swimming -- watch for long enough and you'll see a goldfish throw its opponent across the room. The best part is that the matches actually move along pretty quickly. While you'll sometimes see the fighters wasting time, one fish usually gets a knockout before time is up. The feed doesn't run at all hours (usually between 7:30AM and 10PM Eastern), but it should easily keep you distracted while you're at work.

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Chances are you have a smartphone, tablet and computer combo, so it could get pretty annoying to get pinged simultaneously on those devices when you're exchanging messages with someone. Skype and iMessage both do this, but now the Microsoft-owned service is keen on changing that. Today, Skype announced that it's found a way to reduce all the noise for people who are logged in to their accounts on multiple devices, thanks to a new feature called "Active endpoint." Now when you're messaging back and forth on your phone, those chat notifications will only be sent to that device -- as opposed to before, where it would also send them to, say, your tablet or laptop at the same time. Skype says that, while notification are set to hit that one active device, the chat history is still being synced across multiple devices, making it easy for you to keep your conversations going from anywhere. This new feature is coming to Skype "over the next few weeks," so expect to see the changes soon.

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Pepsi Super Bowl XLVIII Halftime Show

Being selected to play the Super Bowl Halftime Show is a huge deal -- there's no doubt about that. But this year, the NFL is asking potential acts for the 2015 installment to fork over a share of their post-game tour profits. According to The Wall Street Journal, the league is asking its top three candidates to pay to get the gig. The short list of acts has already been whittled down to Rhianna, Katy Perry and Coldplay, with the NFL seeking to agree on a direct contribution or another form of financial kickback while it makes its final decision. As you might expect, WSJ's sources say the request was met with a "chilly reception" across the board.

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We knew that the National Football League's brand new online network would eventually come to the Apple TV. And now it's here. After not being a part of the NFL Now device lineup on launch day, Apple's streaming box is finally adding the video service to its growing channel portfolio. There are no Apple TV-specific features in tow, and therefore you should expect the same type of content as on apps from other platforms -- such as real-time highlights, live press conferences analysis and, with NFL Now Plus, access to the league's NFL Films vault. Don't worry if you're not seeing it on your Apple TV yet, as it's just started rolling out and it may take a little while before you see the app show up. It''ll be there soon, though, scout's honor.

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TSA Debuts First Recovery Act Funded Advanced Imaging Device

For a while now, folks have been discussing how Rapiscan backscatter X-ray machines used at various security checks can be easily duped. Since metal shows up as black shapes on the scan, it's quite easy to hide something on one's side, or attached to the inside of clothing, blending in to the captured image's background. A cooperative effort amongst researchers from the University of California at San Diego, University of Michigan and John Hopkins has been looking into possible tricks of their own. The group discovered that teflon tape could be used to conceal a weapon on the spine, malware is capable of faking image captures and wrapping items (like simulated explosives) around the body could make them read as flesh on the scans. A bit of good news is the Rapiscan Secure 1000 model tested by the team was swapped out last year by the TSA in favor of millimeter-wave scanners that provide a less detailed image to security personnel. However, the systems remain in use for government buildings around the US.

[Photo credit: Michael Fein/Bloomberg via Getty Images]

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