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Sprint Corp. Stores Ahead Of Earnings Figures

This morning Sprint announced it planned to "end consumer confusion and frustration" with an "All-in" pricing plan that combined unlimited data with a two-year phone lease for $80 total. The only problem? An absurd limit capping video streams at 600Kbps. Tonight, CEO Marcelo Claure announced that he has heard consumer frustration with the cap, and Sprint will not place any limits on streaming video with the plan. The press release reveals a bit more detail about the revised plan, saying that "we might have to manage the network in order to reduce congestion" for other customers, so it's still not all good news for the plan. Still, if you don't mind a second-tier experience during busy times, it might be a cheap way to get service and keep re-upping on new phones every couple of years.

[Image credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images]

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A visual representation of the Codephage

The days of waiting anxiously for bug fixes (assuming they come at all) might soon be over. MIT developers have built a system, CodePhage, that automatically patches flaws by borrowing features from other apps. The tool scans apps to see how they perform security checks, and imports any superior techniques it finds -- whether or not they're written in the same programming language. It doesn't need access to the source code to see what makes something tick, and it'll even check that any fixes are working the way you'd expect. While this is still early and likely wouldn't address every glitch, the hope is that you'll get software which perpetually improves itself. You wouldn't have to worry about security exploits so long as they've been fixed in at least one other program.

[Image credit: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT]

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Google's been systematically rolling out high frame rate (HFR) video -- that's 60 frames per second -- across its YouTube ecosystem for a couple of months now. HFR debuted on standard videos last October. It hit YT's live streaming service in May and today Google announced that the YouTube mobile app for both iOS and Android will now feature 60 FPS playback. Now you'll be able to follow Far Cry 4 walkthroughs on your mobile device with the same silky smooth playback that you see on your TV.

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Nearly five months after introducing its Air lens camera in Japan, Olympus is finally ready to bring it to the US. The AIR A01, as it's officially named, is a shooter that attaches to and pairs with your smartphone or tablet -- in similar fashion to Sony's QX line of devices. Spec-wise, the Olympus Air features a Micro Four Thirds, 16-megapixel sensor, a TruePic VII image-processing chip, RAW capture, up to 1080p video-recording, 10 fps continuous shooting, Bluetooth and WiFi. There is, of course, a companion app for iOS, Android and Amazon's Kindle platform, which you can use to control the camera as well as transfer images from it.

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grey keyboard red enter button lock symbol leak

VPNs (virtual private networks) are a popular choice for sidestepping censorship and geographic restrictions on services like Netflix with more than 20 percent of Europeans using them. However, researchers at the Queen Mary, University of London recently examined 14 of the region's most popular VPN providers and found nearly all of them leaked information about their users to some degree. These leaks ranged from minor, ie what site you visited, to major infractions including the actual content of your communications.

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Acer's XR341CK curved display

You can get desktop PC displays that are curved, super-wide and gaming-friendly, but all three at once? That's tricky. Thankfully, Acer thinks it has an answer. The company has just launched the 34-inch XR341CK in the US, giving you a curvy, 21:9 aspect ratio LCD with AMD's anti-tearing FreeSync tech built-in. So long as you have a fast-enough gaming rig (including newer AMD graphics, if you want FreeSync), you'll get an extra-immersive canvas for your first-person shooters and racing sims.

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washington   october 26 ...

The ongoing saga around the NSA's bulk data collection program is getting even more confusing. A U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court ruled yesterday that the program can temporarily resume, refuting a Second Circuit court decision from May deeming it illegal, reports the New York Times. "Second Circuit rulings are not binding" said the surveillance court's Judge Michael Mosman, in an opinion released today, "and this court respectfully disagrees with that court's analysis, especially in view of the intervening enactment of the U.S.A. Freedom Act." The news comes after Congress voted to reform government surveillance by voting in the Freedom Act in June, which effectively ends bulk data collection by requiring agencies to get court approval when requesting information from telecoms and other firms. The White House quietly moved to resume the program shortly after the Freedom Act was signed.

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Doomed Indiegogo campaign hopes to crowdfund Greece's debt relief

Can crowdfunding do something better than make a beer cooler with a built-in Bluetooth speaker? That's what Thom Feeney believes after setting up an Indiegogo campaign to pay Greece's $1.7 billion loan fee that it owes to the International Monetary Fund. The project is hoping to raise the cash by encouraging all of Europe's 503 million citizens to kick in a few bucks for a postcard, a Greek salad or vouchers for a bottle of Ouzo. The page has been up for just over two days and already the figure stands at €200,000 ($223,000), although that's still less than a tenth of a percent towards the final figure.

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When it first announced plans to let you send money to your pals in its Messenger app, Facebook said the feature would roll out in the States in the coming months. Well, the time has come. After flipping the switch for folks in New York City and the surrounding areas in late May, the social network is letting users in the rest of the US beam funds to friends, too. To leverage the currency tool, you'll need to link a debit card before money can be transferred from your bank account to a recipient. For added security, you'll have to input a PIN before each transaction and iPhone/iPad users can employ Touch ID to verify their identity. And all of the transferred data travels via an encrypted connection. Messenger may not be your first choice to reimburse someone for concert tickets or for picking up your tab, but if you use the app to chat with friends or family, it could come in handy.

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You can learn a lot from someone's personal gadget arsenal, whether at home or on the road. This past week on Public Access gave us a glimpse of your technological inclinations and taught us quite a bit. Miné Salkin's at-home gear is all about enabling multimedia storytelling and journalism, and constitutes a pretty impressive setup for creating and editing 4K video. Alexander Hohenthaner shared the gear he packs in his bag to get through his daily grind. It's not all about now, however. Nostalgia's a powerful thing, and Jess James gave us a heavy dose with fond memories of his first PC, the Atari ST. Meanwhile, Chris Carroll waxed poetic on how filming family get togethers has brought about some peculiar behavior from his relatives.

P.S. The homepage is coming soon! in the meantime you can check out the latest from Public Access right here. Not a member? Apply, and keep the weird alive.

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Indie games don't sell as many copies as big-budget titles, although not necessarily because they're lower-quality. In general, indie game development starts with a handicap: a limited market. They are, mostly, experiences made for niche audiences. AAA games -- think Call of Duty, Halo, Battlefield, Destiny -- are made for everyone, an audience that's been intensely researched over decades of action-movie box-office sales and Black Friday marketing campaigns. AAA consultants know exactly which games sell the best, where they sell the most, how much the mainstream audience wants to think and what their boundaries are. This approach to creation contributes to the flood of sequels and first-person shooters in our game libraries, now and into the foreseeable future. Sony's and Microsoft's showcases at E3 2015 were soaked in sequels and remakes, leading some fans to question the creative status of the industry as a whole. But, the AAA industry does innovate -- in its own, small way.

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Cisco!

When you think of internet security from Cisco, you probably imagine firewalls and routers (usually) stopping hackers and malware from hitting your network. You're going to have to expand that definition very shortly, though. Cisco has snapped up OpenDNS, whose domain name services you might have used to dodge regional restrictions or improve on your internet provider's less-than-stellar connection. The networking giant isn't making the acquisition for any of those reasons, though. Instead, it's all about boosting Cisco's cloud security -- the goal is to defend against attacks on your corporate network wherever you happen to be, and to predict threats before they strike.

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