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Lyft's pink mustaches were all set to prowl New York City's outer boroughs this week, but it seems that the city itself is having none of it: New York's attorney general is pursuing a court order that will block the company from providing transportation services in Queens and Brooklyn. The lawsuit's complaint closely echoes the concerns of the NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission, which labeled Lyft as "unauthorized" earlier this week for failing to comply with its safety and licensing requirements. It seems to be a matter of distinction -- Lyft labels itself as a peer-to-peer transportation network, but the attorney general says its really a traditional taxi service, and as such, it needs to comply with local laws.

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Today's Digg is a completely different beast from the one we used to know, and that's thanks to a new team that basically brought the brand back from the dead. Before that resurrecting act though, those folks worked on a social news app called News.Me and now they've another stab at that old formula with a feature called Digg Deeper. Here's the formula in a nutshell: in addition to employing humans to curate the best stories from across the web, Digg Deeper will mine your Twitter feed (and eventually other social streams) to find content appreciated by people you actually care about. Yeah, yeah, you're right -- that sounds really generic. The Digg team elaborated on its secret sauce just a bit in a blog post, noting that the amount of Twitter attention needed to bring a story to your attention in Digg Deeper is based on how many people you follow. Alas, you normals can't take it for a spin just yet -- it's currently only open to a handful of old (and loyal) News.Me users for now.

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the united states capitol.

Members of the United States House of Representatives and Senate -- or, more likely, their interns and aides -- spend an awful lot of time editing Wikipedia entries. Not just entries about themselves, either: the list ranges from autobiographical changes to this crucial edit involving President Barack Obama shaking hands with a minotaur. We'll spare you the obvious, "so that's what the United States Congress spends its time on!" joke (or was that it?), and jump right to the credit. A new Twitter account named "congressedits," set up by self-described "web developer/armchair activist" Ed Summers, scans for Wikipedia edits across a variety of IP addresses associated with Congress. Summers got the idea from a similar robot in the United Kingdom. Other versions have since sprouted in Canada and Sweden.

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Sapphire is the birthstone of September, the traditional gift on your 45th wedding anniversary and a material associated with both luxury and ruggedness. It can be found in opulent products like jewelry, camera lenses and fancy watches. Given that, it's also one of the toughest materials in the world, which makes it ideal for military-grade items like aviation displays and even missiles. So when rumors emerged that a sapphire display may be featured on the next iPhone, a chorus of excitement followed. However, many phone manufacturers don't share the same sense of optimism that Apple might hold toward this different kind of next-gen display.

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There are good cameras that look cute, take passable pictures and don't cost an arm and a leg. And then there are incredible cameras that can really do it all, but come along with comparatively astronomical price tags. The Sony RX100 is the latter -- the original model, which cost $650 and first appeared in 2012, was already wildly popular with camera enthusiasts, and 2014's version cashes in on two additional years of R&D. The result is a more capable point-and-shoot that's even pricier, at $800, but still worth every penny: It's the RX100 III.

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Heart-rate monitoring chest straps won't be with us for much longer, as wrist-worn devices are offering optical sensors that do exactly the same job. PulseOn is the latest, and having spun out of Nokia back in 2012, is now offering its first entry into the market, the, uh, PulseOn. Confusing nomenclature aside, the company is now accepting pre-orders through Indiegogo, which was used to help raise awareness as well as cash for the small outfit. We've spent some time with the first model to roll off the production line, so if you're curious if it's worth splashing $170 out on one, read on.

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business executive in formal...

You have what you think is a cool idea, but you aren't sure if you can convince investors about the sales potential of, say, a tiny monitor strapped to your face, or a watch that is also a computer. Besides, who are "investors" and how do you summon them from their secret offshore lairs to pass judgment on your notional widget? Wouldn't it be easier if you could just put your idea on the internet, letting regular people who might be on your wavelength pledge directly to help get it done?

That's what crowdfunding is about. Services like Kickstarter, Indiegogo, Patreon and others gather funds directly from buyers, to make potentially crazy ideas a reality. Crazy ideas like a salad... made with potatoes. But it's not all free money and rampant innovation.

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Samsung's Tizen mobile OS already powers a pair of smartwatches, but what about those smartphones we've been promised for so long? Well the company's first consumer-ready Tizen phone -- the Samsung Z -- was supposed to make its official debut at a developer event in Moscow yesterday. Of course, the key words there are "supposed to". To hear the folks at the Wall Street Journal tell the tale, there was a Tizen event for enthusiasts, but Samsung quietly pulled the plug on the Z's launch days earlier.

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If you saw Reggie Watts' musical set at Engadget Expand (don't worry, there's video after the break), then you probably noticed the table full of gear he needs to construct his loops. Propellerhead -- the Swedish software company behind Reason, not the electronica duo -- is hoping to lighten this load with Take, a creative vocal loop recorder that's being given away free to iPhone users. The interface is reasonably simple, offering you a wide variety of pre-made backing loops as well as three tracks that you can rap, sing or otherwise make noise on. It's tremendously easy to use, but it won't compensate for your lack of musical talent, which is why we won't be sharing our ham-fisted efforts with you.

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DARPA, the government agency known for its robots and other crazy futuristic inventions, just announced a new project that could lead to the quicker development of advanced military vehicles. This new project is called Materials Development for Platforms, and it aims to shorten the timespan between designing tough materials that can withstand harsh environments and having them used on actual military equipment. Apparently, such a process typically takes more than a decade (that's why the Luke arm's relatively fast FDA approval was darn impressive). But MDP seeks to come up with the methodology and tools to cut that down to two-and-a-half years.

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