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Skype users aren't safe from app-crashing messages, too. VentureBeat has discovered through the service's community forums that the app suffers from a bug similar to Apple's texting flaw. If you recall, that one crashes the Messages app when it receives a specific string of Unicode characters. It's even easier to put Skype out of commission: all it takes is sending or receiving "http://:" without the quotes. The flaw affects Skype for Windows, iOS and Android in different situations. For instance, it crashes the Windows app if you're the sender and completely kills it if it's the one receiving that string of characters. However, the iOS and the Android apps are only affected when they're the recipient, and Skype for Mac seems to be immune from the issue.

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After Microsoft recapped all of the major themes from the Build conference at its Computex keynote today, it tried another tactic to promote Windows 10: showing off sexy new devices. Microsoft corporate vice president Nick Parker revealed for the first time a 15-inch version of Dell's XPS with its nearly bezel-less screen; an all-in-one from Acer; a convertible Toshiba notebook; and a mysterious HP tablet. Unfortunately, HP whisked away that new tablet before we could take any photos, but it appeared to work with some sort of keyboard cover. Details on practically all of these devices are nil for now, but we've gotten in touch with all of the respective companies for more. For now, ogle at the pics.

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If you don't want to be reliant on (or still don't really like using) a trackpad, and tire of dragging a full-sized mouse around, then the Odin, a laser-projected mouse, might be worth a look. You've seen (even very recently) laser projected interfaces that cover keyboards, but the team that made Odin says it's the world's first laser-projected mouse interface. Which sounds pretty cool... as long as you're willing to carry around the disembodied head of a tiny Transformer around when meddling with spreadsheets. We just gave it a cursory web browsing test, and while it lacks, obviously, the physical feedback of either mice or clickable trackpads, it behaves a whole lot the former. We just wished it looked a little, well, subtle.

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AT&T previously called the FCC's new net neutrality rules "a tragic step in the wrong direction" and even filed a lawsuit to block them. However, it would obey at least some of the new stipulations if its $49 billion purchase of DirecTV is approved by regulators, according to the Washington Post. That's a big reversal from before, when it specifically said it would not tie any net neutrality promises to the merger. It also contrasts sharply with Comcast, which vowed it would walk away from its (now-moot) TWC merger before bending on net neutrality.

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Google and other companies developing self-driving vehicles now have another state to consider for public road testing: Virginia. It has earmarked 70 miles of highway in the northern part of the state -- now called the "Virginia Automated Corridors" -- for the project, which will be overseen by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI). Any car slated for testing in the Mother of States must first undergo an initial trial on the institute's smart roads before they're unleashed in public. VTTI director Myra Blanco told Richmond Times-Dispatch that the state will make the process easier for interested parties compared to other states. But if the car does pass the trial, it will still have to be manned by a driver during the actual tests, just in case the vehicle's system malfunctions.

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Used to be that if you purchased and downloaded a game from Steam, and it didn't work out for whatever reason, you'd generally be SOL. However, Valve has recently reversed its zero tolerance return policy and will issue refunds for online purchases (with a few caveats) through Steam Support. According to the newly established Steam Refunds page, "You can request a refund for nearly any purchase on Steam — for any reason." That's just so long as you've played the game for less than two hours and request the refund within two weeks of buying it. DLC content has a similar two-hour window while in-app purchases will be refundable for a full 48 hours. There are a few niggling exceptions to that rule -- movies and games you've been banned in, for example, are not eligible -- so head over to the refunds page if you have specific questions about your purchase.

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Tumblr has made it easier to keep trolls out of your account. The feature has been renamed "Block" -- "A proper, muscular name," the Yahoo-owned company said -- and it's accessible from several locations on the website. To shake off haters and weirdos, you can click on their avatar on your dashboard to load a right-hand side menu, where you can find block under the human-shaped icon. If you want to hit someone with the banhammer straight from your Inbox, you can also do so: just click the big X on mobile or find block under the ellipsis' drown-down menu. Finally, you can go to your settings page and manually enter the user you want to keep out.

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In an effort to better compete with rival eBay, Amazon announced a new service today that offers free shipping on small, lightweight items for every customer -- not just Prime members. Dubbed "Fulfillment by Amazon Small and Light" the new shipping scheme will bring tiny items your door in four to eight business days without the need for a minimum order value. The items just need to weigh less than 8 ounces, measure under 9x6x2 inches and cost less than $10 to qualify. Amazon reportedly hopes to attract a wider customer base including cost-aware shoppers -- ie folks worried that shipping and handling will cost more than their ear bud inserts. Additionally, the new program will act as an alternative to the company's existing $99 a year, delivery-in-two-days Prime subscription.

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You're entirely forgiven if you thought that Blizzard's take on the MOBA genre (or multiplayer online battle arena if you aren't into the whole brevity thing), Heroes of the Storm was already released. What, with the massive beta and equally sizable ad campaign that's taken over late-night TV recently that's perfectly understandable. However, the official release is actually today, and with it comes a commemorative in-game portrait and experience-point boosts for those playing for this first week and the first three weeks, respectively. In case you haven't given it a go yet and are curious what it looks like when Starcraft characters duke it out with those from Warcraft, there's really not much stopping you from at least giving it a try. The game is free to download and play, after all. And who knows, if you dig it you could be the next hero of the dorm.

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With AMD's new sixth-generation A-series processors, laptops in the $400 to $700 range could soon become far more capable. Formerly code-named "Carizzo," the new chips offer twice the gaming performance of Intel's Core i7, thanks to discrete Radeon graphics. They're the first mainstream processors with hardware decoding for H.265/HEVC video, the successor to the current H.264 standard which includes far better compression and support for 4K resolutions. And they'll also pack in up to 12 compute cores (four CPU and eight GPU), which basically means they'll be able to handle whatever you throw at them. Why focus on mainstream laptops? AMD notes that it's the largest segment of the PC market by revenue and volume sold, so it makes sense for a company that's traditionally focused on value to show it some love.

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