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CIA Responds To Senate Intelligence Report

Usually, deleting emails is a no-fanfare, one-click affair -- but not when you're the Central Intelligence Agency or the Department of Homeland Security. Both agencies have recently submitted proposals to the National Archives and Records Administration that outline their plans to delete years' worth of emails, which the Archives has already tentatively approved. The CIA apparently turned one in to comply with the administration's directive, ordering federal agencies to conjure up viable plans to better manage government emails by 2016. If approved, all the correspondences of every person to ever be employed by the CIA will be flushed down the digital toilet three years after they leave. All messages older than seven years old will also be nuked, and only the digital missives of 22 top officials will be preserved -- something which several senators do not want to happen.

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Sony's first idea to be born out of its new built-in "venture style" plan to create new products and impress, well, you and me, is apparently a combination of its e-ink reader tech and a smartwatch device. According to people familiar with the matter, both the watch face and wristband will be crafted from a "patented material" that'll be able to offer up all kinds of displays and different designs -- something that is also the thinking between the image you see above. That's no Sony prototype, but FES' e-ink watch: a device that's seeking crowdfunding in, oh, Japan. Using e-ink could also differentiate the product, if it happens, from the Pebble, which uses a lower-resolution monochrome LCD instead.

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Tired of just having static pictures to visually guide you through your contacts list? If so, you're in luck. A new app for iOS brings video updates to said collection of names and numbers so "you can see what all your friends are up to." The software is called Rinbw, and it replaces images for your pals that opt in with 5-second clips updated at will. You can also "fruit" a clip, which is the app's term for letting folks know you've seen their latest work. And as you might expect, notifications alert you every time a fellow Rinbw user posts a new status. "Scrolling through your contact list used to be boring and unexciting. Rinbw turns it into a fun way to share moments of your life with your friends at any time and place," the company explains. Itchin' to give it a go? The app available for free via the iTunes link that follows.

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China's strained relationship with the concept of intellectual property is one of the reasons that you can buy a local copy of a Range Rover Evoque for a third of the price. That's one of the reasons why western businesses are wary about selling their products in the nation, since it can often be time consuming and expensive. Still, it looks as if HBO is going to try and buck the trend after recruiting Tencent to distribute shows such as Game of Thrones, Rome and True Detective through the latter's Tencent Video streaming service.

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Given how ubiquitous smart devices are, one might think that, overall, people would have a pretty comprehensive knowledge of tech. That isn't exactly the case. According to a recent Pew Research survey, 60 percent of the representative sample knew that tweets are limited to 140 characters, but only 42 percent knew that Harvard is where Facebook originated. And despite how much new iPhone announcements dominate the news cycle, only some 36 percent correctly picked 2007 as the year Apple unveiled its first smartphone. Even fewer were able to accurately identify the first "widely popular graphical web browser." Hint: it wasn't Netscape Navigator. As The Washington Post points out, a vast majority of people happen to think that "World Wide Web" and "internet" are interchangeable too.

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If the industry based its grades solely on effort, there's no doubt BlackBerry would be among the first top spots. Now, whether or not those efforts are actually effective, well, that's a completely different story. Since its notable decline, the Canadian company's had to get creative to try and bring back customers it lost, namely to other competitors in the mobile space like Google and Apple. With that in mind, BlackBerry has a introduced the Trade-Up Program, which it intends to use to convince iPhone users to trade in their device for its flagship smartphone, the Passport.

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Firefox's new search interface

Mozilla isn't just rethinking its choice of default search engines in Firefox; it's overhauling the search bar itself. An upcoming version of the web browser will let you search a specific site with one click. If you want to find an ancient Twitter update or scour Wikipedia, you won't have to wait until you get to the search results to take action. The update will let you add other sites, too, such as your favorite restaurant recommendation page. You can argue that Firefox is catching up to Chrome, which lets you type the site you mean to search, but it's hard to object to anything that helps you get to what you wanted a little bit sooner.

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If you bought Halo: The Master Chief Collection, then you're probably still waiting for online multiplayer to be un-broken. Welcome to the age of the "day one patch." That's not all we have on deck, though -- read on for Engadget's news highlights from the last 24 hours.

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NASA's first object 3D-printed in space

At long last, 3D printing has conquered its final frontier: space. NASA has successfully printed its first 3D object aboard the International Space Station. It's just a tiny faceplate that identifies the printer maker (Made In Space), but it's both a symbolic milestone and a source of valuable feedback for tweaking the printer's output. For instance, NASA now knows that parts stick to the print tray more in microgravity than they do on Earth; it's possible that plastic layers bond differently in orbit.

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Spotify may be a big name when it comes to music streaming, but the company is hardly rolling in the dough. The private company disclosed today that it took in 747 million euros (around $1.03 billion at the time) in 2013, up about 74 percent from 2012. However, shelling out a good portion of that to record companies and publishers led to net losses of $80 million for the year -- a near 70 percent cut that takes the majority of the service's revenue. The numbers reveal that Spotify isn't quite lining its pockets with cash. In fact, more folks opt for the free option instead of paying a monthly fee. Only 8 million of the 36 million active listeners at the end of last year were opening their wallets. Some quick math shows that to be a little less than a quarter of the total user base.

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