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With golf season in mid-swing, is your handicap going down, or just your morale? If it's the latter, a few extra lessons might be in order. Given that I write for Engadget (and not Golf Digest) I can't school you, but I can help you with some technology tips. There's a glut of golf devices designed to help you score better, and I tested swing sensors from Zepp Golf and 3Bays, along with the presidentially-approved Game Golf shot-tracking system. For good measure, I also tried a Pebble watch with the Golf Pad GPS and scoring system -- and even a pair of shoes from Ogio, better known for laptop bags. So, how'd it go? Pretty good, actually -- you'll probably still want those lessons, but these gadgets can get you going in the right direction. Also, and perhaps most importantly, they're kind of fun, too.

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Halo: The Master Chief Collection promises to be the ultimate compilation for fans of John-117's adventures and online competitors alike, featuring remastered versions of all four numbered Halo titles (and access to the Halo 5: Guardians beta when it's live). Undoubtedly the most exciting part of the package is Halo 2: Anniversary, a fully remastered version of the 2004 title that set the bar for online multiplayer gaming on consoles. With attentive level design, balanced gameplay and a strong online ranking and matchmaking system, the game spawned a pro scene that's persisted from sequel to sequel, console to console. Halo: Combat Evolved may have introduced us to Master Chief's world, but it was Halo 2 that assured the franchise's legendary status, and it's coming back for more.

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FLIR has just shown a dramatic spectrum of Formula 1 racing you may not have even realized you were missing: full infrared. The company filmed Red Bull's RB8 F1 car doing donuts at the Gamma Racing Day in Assen using its FLIR X6580sc and other infrared cameras. As shown in the video below, the drivers are literally surrounded by flames and heat coming off the tires, engine and exhaust. You can also see the still glowing tracks left by the tires, Back to the Future style, and the hot bits of rubber that flew off. The only thing missing is the smoke, which is a good thing -- as shown by a regular camera, it almost completely covers the car at one point.

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BAE Systems Smart Skin

Modern aircraft require lots of ground checks to ensure they're safe to fly, but researchers at BAE Systems believe they've found new hi-tech way to minimize that down time. Using tens of thousands of micro-sensors, the aerospace giant has developed a new type of "smart skin" that can detect damage and report back health statistics to its operator. BAE says the experimental coating might sense wind speed, temperature, movement and strain in the same way that human skin detects and sends impulses back to the brain, reducing the need for personnel to make physical inspections on the ground. On top of that, maintenance crews could also replace parts before they become unsafe or inefficient. While its new smart skin is still very much in development, BAE reckons it can shrink its self-powered sensors down to the size of a grain of rice and then spray them onto new or existing aircraft like paint. Planes with feelings, it appears, won't just be limited to animated Disney films.

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A few days ago, a Brazilian judge ordered Apple and Google to pull Secret from the local app store and wipe it from the handsets of whose who had downloaded it. The same ruling covered Microsoft, who was ordered to do the same to Windows Phone clone Cryptic. So far, however, only Apple has begun to comply with the order, after suspending fresh downloads of the app to iOS accounts registered in Brazil. According to local news media, the company hasn't started pulling the software from individual handsets, but that's still more than Google or Microsoft have done. Both companies claim that they've not been directly notified of the widely-reported ruling, although it's more likely that they're waiting on a final decision from the courts before taking any action.

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The influence of Hong Kong action cinema stars like Bruce Lee lives on in today's cinema, but the ancient styles they based their techniques on are slowly dying out. There's now a crowdfuding project aimed at preserving the heritage of different Kung Fu fighting styles, called the Hong Kong Martial Arts Living Archive. It's a collaboration between a martial arts society called the International Guoshu Association (IGU) and the City University of Hong Kong. The goal is to use photos, high-speed video, panoptic video and motion capture to record and quantize the different techniques.

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Even if their intentions are good, there's a reason that we don't let amateurs do brain surgery or design housing complexes. That logic doesn't seem to apply at the highest levels of government, however, after Michael Daniel boasted that about his lack of knowledge in his specialist field. In an interview with GovInfoSec, the White House cybersecurity co-ordinator has revealed that he's not technically-minded, but that he doesn't "have to be a coder in order to do really well." He added that "being too down in the weeds at a technical level could actually be a bit of a distraction." Sure, being able to see the wood for the trees when you're in charge of the nation's electronic safety is a good thing, but as Princeton's Ed Felten remarked, there'd be uproar if the attorney general bragged about a lack of legal expertise. Maybe we'll start working on our application to become the next surgeon general, after all, we have seen at least four episodes of ER.

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Here's a friendly tip for all wildlife photographers out there: don't let mischievous monkeys (and other jungle animals) push the shutter button in your stead. The U.S. Copyright Office just released a new public draft of its compendium of practices, and in it, the agency clearly states that it will only recognize original works created by human beings. This new section's first example of works it cannot register? "A photograph taken by a monkey," alluding to the controversial simian selfies that took the internet by storm weeks ago. People have been debating whether photographer David Slater actually owned the right to those images (a couple of which you can see above) since the camera-loving black crested macaque -- or Macaca nigra, a critically endangered species -- used the equipment he set up. Slater even made plans to bring Wikipedia to court for refusing to take those pictures off the website, which he claims has been robbing him of much-needed royalties.

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According to reports from both The Wrap and Deadline, Steven Spielberg is trying to resurrect Minority Report as a TV series. The original movie was a science-fiction styled thriller set in the near-future - and its ideas on gesture-based interfaces have been referenced ever since. Fast Company even elaborated on seven crime-fighting technologies featured in the movie that had inspired real-life techniques. Other tech referenced in the 2002 movie included e-paper, retina scanners and advertising with facial recognition built-in. Spielberg wants the show to be produced by his company Amblin Entertainment and is looking to hook Godzilla writer Max Borenstein to pen it. Deadline adds that the project remains at the "very early stages of development." And in case you forgot, the movie itself was (pretty loosely) based on a short story by Philip K. Dick. If the TV series does happen, maybe it'll get a novelization -- and the circle will be complete.

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We already know that the United States Congress (or the countless people it employs) can't seem to stop editing Wikipedia articles, but do they need to be such jerks about it? Case in point: Wiki tinkerers using an IP address connected to the US House of Representatives have been blocked from making edits to articles for the third time this summer. The first two bans were relatively short, but this time the block will stick for a month because a congressional staffer (or staffers) associated with the IP address made a handful of offensive edits that denigrated transgender people. And the straw that seemed to break the admin's back? A particularly distasteful change to the page devoted to Orange Is The New Black.

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