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Anti-job cut protest in Madrid

Governments aren't usually quick to react to changes in demographics. They frequently have to take surveys that are not only slow, but don't always paint a complete picture of what's going on. Researchers at the Autonomous University of Madrid have discovered a far more effective way of keeping tabs on the population, however: tracking Twitter updates. They've found that the content, frequency and timing of tweets across Spain correlate well with joblessness levels in their respective regions. People in high unemployment areas tend to not only mention jobs more often in their posts, but tweet more in the morning and make a larger number of spelling mistakes. Since it's both easy and quick to collect that information, it's possible to track economic patterns almost as they happen -- you can see when a financial crisis hits a city hard, or when there's a job boom.

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Google's been wrestling with the European Union over antitrust issues for a long while now. Today, though, Parliament says it's come up with a possible solution: severing search from the rest of Google. Read on for the rest of our news highlights from the last 24 hours, including the Fire HD 6, Amazon's rumored video-streaming service and an interactive map of public defecation.

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2014 NBC Upfront Presentation

Last year, NBC announced it would be home to a new show written and produced by Tina Fey (30 Rock, SNL) and starring Ellie Kemper (The Office), but now that show's going straight to Netflix. Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt will premiere across all of Netflix's territories in March with its 13-episode first season, and Netflix has already signed it up for a second. According to NBC exec Rob Greenblatt, the move is a result of NBC's "very drama-heavy mid-season schedule", and he calls Netflix's two-season pickup an "instant win-win for everyone." The comedy series is about a woman who starts over in New York after leaving the cult where she's lived for the last 15 years, armed with "a backpack, light-up sneakers, and a couple of way-past-due library books." In case 30 Rock fans needed any more reason to tune in, Jane Krakowski and Titus Burgess will be appearing as well. That should help fill the gap until Judd Apatow's Love in 2016, and will arrive around the same time as Netflix's new drama series Bloodline.

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The Hamptons Lure Uber Top Drivers Amid NYC Slow Summer Weekends

Uber is not having a good week. Between surreptitiously tracking journalists' trips inside 'God View' and an executive implying the company should dig up dirt on reporters critical of the service, the company has been on a pretty bumpy road. However, they're still one of the most popular ride sharing services. Does the company's seemingly callous disregard for customer privacy change whether you still use its app? Head over to the Engadget forums and share your thoughts on ridesharing.

[Image credit: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images]

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Earlier this month, Google Maps for Android received the requisite Material Design update and tacked on in-app restaurant reservations for good measure (in the US). A new version is rolling out, and with it comes some handy features to lend a hand with those navigation needs. The app will display time, weather and a smattering of facts about your destination in addition to letting you know exactly how much time that alternate route will save. In addition, Maps can show or hide traffic with a simple voice command, should you need to sort the info without futzing with that handset. Version 9.1 should hit your devices soon, but if you can't wait, the folks over at Android Police have the APK available for manual install.

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If you're an AT&T customer eager to get your hands on the over-sized Nexus 6, get ready to wait a bit. AT&T stores are apparently returning the first crop of Nexus 6 units to Motorola over a software bug, Droid Life reports. And it'll likely be a while until their stock is replenished. The bug reportedly kills network connectivity on affected phones after displaying a black screen. We haven't seen too many complaints about the issue yet, but they've only started shipping out to preorder customers a few days ago. In any case, be prepared to hop it back to an AT&T store if the bug hits you. While the recall doesn't inspire much confidence, it could be worse. Just imagine if Motorola had to issue a widespread recall after thousands of people had their phones for weeks. For now, would-be Nexus 6 owners an AT&T can keep a giant candy bar or block of cheese nearby to train their hands for the phone's massive proportions.

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The Federal Communications Commission might seem slow, even resistant to calls for Net Neutrality, but FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler says the organizations slow reaction is very deliberate. "The big dogs are going to sue regardless of what comes out," the Chairman told reporters today. "We need to make sure that we have sustainable rules, and that starts with making sure that we have addressed the multiplicity of issues that comes along and are likely to be raised." In other words, the FCC's plans for an open internet need to be strong enough weather the legal ire of ISPs opposed Net Neutrality.

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ZURICH, SWITZERLAND - MARCH  14, 2014: Google Corporation Building sign.

Google's been caught up in an antitrust tango with the European Union for years, and since the EU hasn't been thrilled with the search giant's attempted concessions, there might be an extreme new option on the table. According to a report from the Financial Times, the European Parliament is expected to ask Google to split itself in twain, leaving its search business separate from the rest of its commercial operations (we've reached out to Google and the European Commission for comment, and will update this story if/when they get back to us). If all goes well (or poorly, if you're a Googler), the matter -- which has the combined support of the European People's Party and the European Socialists & Democrats -- is expected to be put to a vote as soon as next Thursday.

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If you enjoy the handy chat feature inside shared docs on Google Drive, it appears Microsoft is adding the feature to its web-based productivity suite as well. According WinSuperSite, Office Online is getting those sidebar convos in the coming weeks, as a new feature called document chat will offer the collaborative boost. For now, it looks like Word and PowerPoint will be the only apps to get the new tool, complete with notifications that'll alert you to respond as needed. This means you can inquire about the real-time changes you see, rather than guess why your colleagued swapped around your sentence structure or wait for them to reply to a comment.

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ABC's

While the debate over compensation from streaming services rages on, the Country Music Association says those music libraries boost sales better than radio plays. In a recent study, the CMA found that listeners over the age of 18 were prone to purchase tunes after hearing them for the first time on YouTube, Spotify, Pandora and others rather than being introduced via AM/RM radio. 25 percent of participants opened their wallets after streaming a new track, but only 8 percent of those tuning in on the radio did so. The CMA says the survey included other genres as well, so the results aren't specific to its own audience. Of course, when using a service like Rdio, you're already at a computer or have your phone handy, so leveraging either device for a purchase is quick and easy. Radio is still the place most folks hear new music for the first time though, according to the CMA's sample pool. If you're after further reading on the matter, Pandora conducted a study of its own, which to the surprise of no one, found its offering benefits album sales, too.

[Photo credit: Mark Levine/ABC via Getty Images]

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