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The Foursquare faithful have had some time to get used social venue tracker's Swarm option for sorting check-ins, as the outfit jettisoned the activity to a second app. Folks who didn't want to give up the OG method were still able to tally stops, but now the redesigned search-focused software is imminent. As of tomorrow, you'll have to use Swarm for all check-ins, and Foursquare claims that about 75 percent of your fellow users have already made the leap. What's more, the company has a new logo to go along with the upcoming app that it's teasing as well. Once you pipe in info on your personal tastes, follow a few experts and make a few stops, the new Foursquare will learn about your delicate sensibilities and make recommendations based on the gathered info. However, you don't need to have Swarm installed to make use of the original app's new focus on "personalized local search." As you can see in the screenshots above, the directory will offer to hop over for a check-in -- if you've installed both applications, of course. Unfortunately, there's no date for the official arrival, but the announcement claims you'll be leveraging the tidied up ratings and tips "really soon."

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Amazon's recently announced music service for Prime members just got a bit better. Today, the giant online retailer revealed that its Prime Music library is welcoming a bunch of new songs into the mix, from artists such as Miles Davis, Ray Charles, Kendrick Lamar, Shakira, Skrillex, Ella Fitzgerald, DJ Snake & Lil Jon (#TD4W, anyone?) and many, many more. To make use of these newly added tunes, Amazon said it has curated "hundreds" of fresh Prime Playlists, citing this feature as one users have come to love since the service's launch last month. Amazon will need to keep making similar moves if Prime Music is to be a threat to the likes of Spotify, so this is, without a doubt, a step in the right direction. The next natural step would be expanding outside of the US, but record labels might make that a lot more complicated than it sounds.

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Sharing a self-destructing file in Digify

It's understandable if you're nervous about sharing files in this era of widespread surveillance. Can you really trust that a document is safe once it's out of your hands? Digify might just ease your mind now that it has launched Android and iOS apps for sharing self-destructing files. Rather than give people a direct download, the software only allows a peek at a given file for a set amount of time; once the Mission Impossible-style countdown hits zero, the content is gone for good. There are also safeguards against cleverer attempts to steal files. Anything you share is converted to a special format on Digify's servers, for one thing. Recipients can't take screenshots without alerting you (and losing access), and you can revoke access at will if you ever make a mistake.

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StubHub has revealed that it's been the victim of a global fraud operation that's lasted longer than a year. Rather than being hacked, however, criminals obtained user details from other websites and keylogging software, then proceeded to make purchases on the eBay-owned ticket site. Company official Glenn Lehrman has told Reuters that authorities in the US, Canada and the UK will conduct arrests later today, at which point more details will be released. Worried users of the service should relax, for the moment at least, since the company has promised that any unauthorized transactions were spotted and refunded back in 2013.

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The magnetic, interconnecting circuit boards that make up LittleBits' library of electronic modules make it easy to build all sorts of neat (and noisy) devices with almost no technical knowledge at all -- but if you want to create something that connects to the cloud, you're out of luck. Well, you were: today LittleBits is announcing the Cloud Bit, a new module that, as company CEO and founder Ayah Bdeir puts it, allows builders to "just add internet" to almost anything. Bdeir tells me that it's gives the average person an easy and open way to contribute to the Internet of Things without wasting time prototyping devices from scratch. She also says that the module is a landmark in changing the perception of LittleBits from toy, to tool.

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Dropbox

Dropbox for Business is good for collaborating on files stored in the cloud, but it hasn't had fine-grained permission control -- not great if you have a sensitive project you'd rather not share with the folks in Accounts Receivable. You'll be glad to hear, then, that Dropbox is introducing some much-needed access limits. You can now say which of your colleagues can edit or view a given file, and you can both set expiry dates and passwords for shared links. In other words, contractors won't get to peek at that big company report once their work is done. The new tricks are available through Dropbox for Business' early access program today, and there are promises of more features within a few months; they'll get the ability to search for text within files, work on Office documents with others and preview that same content on Android.

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The last time Apple released a new version of OS X, we came away feeling a little... underwhelmed. Don't get us wrong: We'll never say no to a free software upgrade. But despite a handful of new apps and features, last year's Mavericks release still felt like the same old OS X. You can't say that about Yosemite, though. The company's next-gen operating system ushers in the Mac's biggest makeover in years, with a flat, streamlined look inspired by iOS 7. Yosemite works more like iOS too, particularly the part where you can route phone calls to your desktop. You'll also enjoy improved Spotlight search, with results that include news, local restaurant listings, Wikipedia pages, movie times and quick unit conversions. Safari works much the same way, and includes some enhanced privacy settings, too. Right now, Yosemite isn't quite finished -- it won't arrive until sometime this fall -- but you can sign up for the public beta, which will open tomorrow for the first million people who enlist. In the meantime, I've been using an early build for a week now. Here's a quick preview for those of you who can't wait till tomorrow.

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Apple's public beta for OS X Yosemite begins tomorrow

The Apple we know is run by a bunch of perfectionists. The company only shows off final devices at its launch events, and developers are strictly forbidden from sharing screenshots of upcoming iOS releases. This is a company that doesn't usually bother with sneak peeks. Or do they? Apple announced a few months ago that it would carry out a public beta-testing program for OS X Yosemite, its next-gen Mac operating system, allowing regular people to give feedback before it eventually gets a wide release. Now, the testing period is finally about to begin: Apple says that beta users will be able to download an early version of the OS starting tomorrow at around 1PM Eastern. If you've already signed up to join the beta program, you don't need to do anything; you'll get a notification tomorrow when the OS is ready to download. If you haven't gotten around to it yet, though, we suggest you get on that ASAP: Only one million people are allowed to participate in this early-stage testing, which means slowpokes might not get a chance.

Update: Our preview of OS X Yosemite is already up, even before the public beta period begins. Read it here!

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Don't be too shocked, but the UK government's porn filter isn't proving very popular. A new report from communications regulator Ofcom reveals that just one in every seven customers are letting the big four UK ISPs guard them from porn and other online nasties. While tiny minorities of users at Virgin Media (four percent), BT (five percent) and Sky (eight percent) opted to keep the filter, TalkTalk ranked as a significant outlier: it reports that 36 percent of customers enabled the government-mandated filters on their home router. TalkTalk puts it down to the fact it pre-ticks the selection box, meaning more customers are likely to keep the option enabled on their account.

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If you've every wanted to try X-Men-style telepathic brainwave amplification, Cerebro isn't real (yet) -- but the Oculus Rift is a damn good surrogate. 20th Century Fox will let you step into Charles Xavier's mind and don the futuristic headgear (the Rift, that is) at Comic-Con in San Diego, starting tonight. Each participant will be immersed in a three minute, panoramic VR presentation on a quest to find nudest of all mutants, Mystique, with the best reactions recorded on a GoPro for Facebook posterity. On top of the VR experience, Fox is offering a limited-edition, thousand-run of X-Men: The Cerebro Collection in a replica Cerebro helmet on pre-order for $80, or $90 with X-Men: Days of Future Past. The latter will also be up for pre-order at $23 alone and both will arrive October 14th, with the Digital HD version set to come on September 23rd.

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