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F-22 Raptor in a hard turn

The US isn't done throwing the book at alleged Chinese industrial spies. The Department of Justice has charged a Chinese executive living in Canada, Su Bin, with stealing sensitive info for Boeing and Lockheed Martin warplanes like the C-17 cargo hauler and F-22 fighter. Reportedly, Su partnered with two people to hack into the aircraft makers' networks and either pass along or sell any secrets to interested parties in China. Unlike other targets of the DOJ's wrath, though, it appears that Su was more concerned about profit than helping any government intelligence efforts. While he was handing over data to state-owned aviation firms, he complained of "stingy" buyers and was willing to take a long time to hash out a deal -- not exactly the hallmarks of a government-backed spy.

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Just like the Star Trek movies, we've mostly preferred the even-numbered ranges of Nokia Lumia handsets to the odds. We heaped praise on the 620, for example, with equal vitriol being poured onto the 520 that nestled beneath it. The Lumia 720 suffered the same fate when we reviewed it, finding that no matter how gussied-up the outside was, the low-power internals were an instant turn off. But what about you? It's likely that plenty of you only had room in your budget for this device, so was the experience as bad as you'd expected? Why not hop into our forum and talk yourself some Lumia.

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Google Play Store redesign for 2014

Many would argue that the Google Play Store for Android is useful in its current form, but pretty? Not so much. However, there are now signs that it's going to be much better-looking -- if not necessarily more functional. Android Police has obtained a wealth of screenshots hinting at a big Play Store revamp that borrows more than a few pages from the company's new Material Design handbook. Extra-large artwork is everywhere, and there are now a slew of icons that make it clear what you'll be getting, such as mature content. The layout isn't perfect; there's a lot of scrolling, for example, and some of the sharing features appear to be buried at the bottom. With that said, the new storefront is billed as a work in progress with no definite release date. It wouldn't be out of the question to see a few tweaks before the store reaches your mobile device of choice.

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Uralvagonzavod's Russia One commuter train

Many trams are memorable, but they tend to evoke nostalgia rather than embrace the future. You can't accuse UralVagonZavod (UVZ) of being behind the times with its new Russia One, though. To begin with, it looks like the Batmobile on a closed track -- and for good reason. The forward-tilted windshield helps the conductor spot pedestrians, while the glass composite panels are easy to replace. The tram is cutting-edge on the inside, too. Dynamic LED lighting and music change the cabin mood to suit the time of day. You'll also find positioning (GPS and GLONASS), air conditioning, anti-bacterial hand rails and WiFi. The driver even gets a USB 3.0 port that can keep a phone powered up.

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When Fabien Cousteau embarked on a month-long underwater mission at the Aquarius science lab, Time wanted readers to enjoy as much of the journey from the comfort of their PC as possible. The solution? An interactive 360-degree video. Easy to say, less so to achieve. It took three shoots with strong currents working against them, and a special 360-degree underwater rig to get the footage they needed. But as you'll see, the result is totally worth the effort.

[Image: Edward Linsmier / TIME]

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Snapchat's group World Cup story

Snapchat's first Our Story collaborative photo experiment was strictly an opt-in affair where you had to add a user to see it at all. However, the ephemeral image service is now trying something much more ambitious: it's giving every user access to Brazil Final Live, a group photo album that lets sports fans share pictures themed around the World Cup match between Argentina and Germany. Snapchat tells The Verge that it's curating the images to keep them on topic, but it's otherwise taking a relatively hands-off approach; while you'll automatically see the Brazil feed in your friend list, you're not encouraged to use it.

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Not everyone's compelled to backflip across a canyon on a BMX bike or dive from suborbital space in search of extreme sports thrills. In fact, most of us armchair enthusiasts prefer to get our kicks secondhand. And, more often than not, that footage comes from the likes of a helmet-mounted GoPro camera. Action sports enthusiasts have been wearing these nearly "invisible cameras" (as GoPro calls them) since the company launched in 2004. It's proven to be a very a lucrative niche for founder and CEO Nick Woodman, too, considering the company's recent IPO filing pegged its valuation at $3.86 billion dollars.

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Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week's most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us -- it's the Week in Green.

Self-driving cars are set to become a common sight on roads and highways around the world in the coming years, and Daimler, the parent company of Mercedes-Benz, is taking the lead. The company recently announced plans to launch a self-driving semi truck on the market by 2025. In architecture news, this week a large lotus flower-shaped building sprouted in Wujin, China. The striking building is located in the middle of an artificial lake, and it is cooled with geothermal piles.

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Digital Revolution is an art exhibition currently running at London's Barbican Centre. Part of the exhibition is Google's "DevArt" project -- a selection of code-based installations. Google commissioned three established artists for the show, and ran a competition to find an up-and-coming artist to join them. Below we take a look at how an idea goes from concept, to code, to creation.

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