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Audi has gone to this year's Geneva Motor Show with new versions of its Q7 SUV and R8 sports car in tow: electric-powered versions, that is. The new Q7 E-Tron Quattro looks very similar to the regular Q7, but it's actually a plug-in hybrid that has an electric-only range of 34 miles, thanks to its lithium-ion battery. It promises instant high-speed acceleration from 0 to 62 mph in just six seconds, uses a V6 diesel engine, and has a 166 miles per gallon potential, with speeds reaching up to 140 mph. The hybrid SUV has four driving modes: EV mode uses pure electricity, obviously, while hybrid mode automatically switches between electricity and diesel. Battery hold mode stores any electrical energy for later use, while charge mode is used while charging the battery. Audi plans to release it in the UK by the end of this year for a price that's yet to be announced, but it's still unclear if and when it will be released elsewhere.

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We like Sony's full frame Alpha mirrorless A7-II and light-vacuuming A7s cameras, but the downside is a narrow range of full-frame lenses. It's now resolved the problem significantly with four new models, including a walk-around zoom and fast prime from Zeiss. The latter, a Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA auto-focus model, creates "gorgeous" images according to Steve Huff, though it's not for the faint of wallet at $1,698. The Sony 24-200 f/3.5-6.3 AF zoom, on the other hand, is aimed at tourists with optical stabilization, weather-sealing and a $1,000 price tag.

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Tesla Model S

Every year, all publicly traded US companies are required to notify investors of the unique risks to their business. Elon Musk's Tesla abides by the same rules, and so yesterday laid out an extensive list of factors that it believes could potentially adversely affect its operations. While many of its concerns are to be expected, like worries over the safety of lithium ion batteries used in its cars or the high manufacturing costs of Model S, the company also warned investors that customers intent on pimping their rides could also put a considerable dent in its electric car empire.

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A team of cryptographers have discovered that a security flaw from way back in the '90s still leaves users today vulnerable to cyberattacks. They've dubbed it "Factoring attack on RSA-EXPORT Key" or FREAK, and it renders everyone who uses Safari on Mac and iOS devices or Android's stock browser susceptible to hacking when they visit certain "secure" websites. The researchers listed these affected websites on the study's official page, and notable entries include government-owned ones, such as Whitehouse.gov, NSA.gov and FBI.gov. To understand what FREAK is, we need to go back to the early 1990s when SSL was in the midst of being developed.

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Withings Aura and Nest thermostat, best buds forever

Withings' Aura sleep systemcan only do so much to help you rest by itself. Wouldn't it be nice if it could keep the climate just right, too? It can now -- the Aura just got support for Nest's learning thermostat. When they're linked up, the Nest will maintain an ideal temperature for sleep (around 64F to 68F, or 18C to 20C) once you're unconscious, and revert back to its earlier settings once you've woken up. It's a simple addition, and it won't be cheap at about $550 for the pair. Still, that cost might be justified if you frequently jolt awake because you're freezing or roasting.

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Sonos app updates arrived regularly over the past few months, and with the most recent version, the company makes a welcome improvement. Room control now resides at the top of the interface throughout the app, providing easy access to the speakers you have scattered throughout your house. Before now, switching between or grouping setups could only be accessed from the Now Playing screen. This feature was in beta for a bit, but version 5.3 is ready for everyone. The update also delivers a redesigned tablet UI and the ability to quickly swipe back and forth between what's playing and browsing your library -- rather than having to tap back a few times. Swiping down on the Now Playing window goes straight back to browsing, and then doing so from left right will access the menu with the full list of connected music sources. On the surface, these may seem like minor tweaks, but if you've spent any time with the Sonos controller app on iOS or Android, these are certainly welcome improvements.

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Bittorrent's done beta testing its cloud-alternative Sync tool, so it's now releasing not just the stable version, but also a Pro one for businesses. Sync 2.0 still lets you share folders saved on your computer using web links, but it also comes with an assortment of new features. These include the ability to link all your devices (PCs, phones and tablets) using a single private account, the power to share folders from any of those linked devices, and being able to grant a person access to your folders just once (he can access them instantly later on), among many other improvements.

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'Vainglory' at Apple's iPhone 6 event

Psst: the games you play might not look as good (or run as smoothly) as they could. In many cases, the overhead from graphics standards gets in the way -- Apple went so far as to develop its own technology just to make sure that iPhones and iPads could live up to their potential. That bottleneck may not exist for much longer, however. The alliance behind the OpenGL video standard has given a sneak peek at Vulkan, an open standard that lets app writers take direct control of graphics chips and wring out extra performance on many devices, whether it's your phone or a hot rod gaming PC. The software isn't a magic bullet (developers still have to make good use of it), but it could easily lead to richer visuals and smoother frame rates without demanding beefier hardware.

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Tired of punching in numbers or swiping strange patterns to unlock your smartphone? Fingerprint and facial recognition have been tried before with varying levels of success, and now ZTE thinks it can offer something better. The company's Grand S3 smartphone in China is getting a feature called "Sky Eye," which lets you swap Android's traditional lockscreen methods with your eyeballs. It uses a biometric authentication called "Eyeprint ID" by EyeVerify and of course, we had to check it out for ourselves.

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You already know what NVIDIA's latest Shield hardware is: an Android TV-powered set-top box that uses the latest chip from NVIDIA. It streams games over the company's "Netflix for gaming" platform known as GRID; it streams games from your local PC; it powers Twitch streaming at the same time of said streamed content; heck, it powers games like Crysis 3 locally, running on Android.

But is it any good? The only answer I've got is maybe.

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