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If there's one thing that China has enjoyed doing this year, it's taking pot-shots at the US as a result of the Snowden revelations. After banning Windows 8, allegedly pushing banks to ditch IBM hardware and calling for severe punishments on Apple and Google, the government is now gunning for the iPhone. Buried deep in iOS 7 is a Google Now-esque location tracking feature that can offer recommendations and improve the mapping experience. China, via its state television mouthpiece, believes that the system's logs could be used by nefarious researchers to extract state secrets. Of course, as the company points out, the data is only uploaded to Apple's servers with your explicit consent, and can be turned off -- but then again, perhaps this latest bout of saber rattling is destined to direct attention away from China's own espionage record.

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A picture taken on February 7, 2012 show

France's "anti-Amazon" law prohibiting free shipping and discounts has now gone into effect, and Amazon quickly announced that it had conformed -- technically. Though it no longer ships books for free, it only charges 0.01 euro, conforming to the letter if not the spirit of the law (French Prime members still receive free book shipping). It's also no longer allowed to give a 5 percent discount on books, the maximum allowed by French law. Despite Amazon's ceremonial cent for shipping, bricks-and-mortar competitors in the country now have a big leg-up. They're exempt from the law and can still offer 5 percent discounts and free delivery -- even those with a large online presence like FNAC, a French book and electronics giant. Meanwhile, Amazon could still appeal the decision to EU courts, who reportedly see the French decision as anti-competitive.

[Image credit: François Guillot/AFP/Getty Images]

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Google Chief Legal Officer David Drummond

Google's top lawyer has spoken out to try to explain the mess that happened last week, when the search giant censored, and then partially reinstated, links to a number of important news articles. Senior VP and Chief Legal Officer David Drummond now admits that some of the initial censorship decisions were "incorrect," specifically in the case of some Guardian newspaper articles that were delisted for a short time. But, as you'd probably expect, he also gives Google's side of the story.

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The Liberty Bell in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is a familiar symbol of independence within the United States and has been descri

Come a guy's 18th birthday in the US, he's afforded new privileges. Aside from being able to legally buy cigarettes, lottery tickets and porn, he also has a couple of shiny civic duties to follow: signing up for the Selective Service System and voting on a regular basis. In terms of the former, draft dodging is a pretty serious offense, as the families of very old (and most likely very deceased) men in Pennsylvania were recently reminded. According to Boston, a database operator's error caused some 14,250 notices to go out to men born between 1893 and 1897, stating that their failure to fill out draft cards could result in fines and imprisonment. How'd that happen? Well, if you're familiar with the Y2K Bug, the story makes a lot more sense.

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Data pulled from a recent Freedom of Information Act request reveals that an overwhelming majority of 911 wireless calls made over a six-month period last year in Washington, DC were delivered "without accurate location information to find callers who are lost, confused, unconscious or otherwise unable to share their location." Only ten percent of calls from the first half of 2013 within the city included detailed location data. At the moment, FCC regulations demand higher location accuracy only on outdoor calls, making built-up areas like DC harder to hone in on. Public safety officials told the Washington Post that these location issues are widespread.

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Since SoundCloud's one of the biggest places to share mixes, recordings and podcasts, it obviously has to grapple with a lot of copyright issues. That's the reason why it reportedly approached record labels to cut licensing deals months ago -- deals, which are now real close to going through, at least according to Bloomberg. The publication says SoundCloud's offering Universal, Sony and Warner Music a 3 to 5 percent stake each, so long as they agree not to sue the company. According to earlier reports, the deal could lead to a more robust library for SoundCloud users, while giving recording companies the right to pull down uploads containing tracks not licensed for use on the service.

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It's understandable if the news of retail giant GameStop getting in on game development made you nervous. The potential of a store with vested interest in exclusive content dictating what goes into a game from its inception is more than a little frightening. It turns out those fears, however, may have been unfounded. Company CEO Paul Raines recently told Time that we won't see the outfit involved with the creative process, nor essentially mandating parts of a main game be blocked off for those who only buy it through his store. "We love to play games, and unlike our competitors all we do is gaming. But we will not be involved in the artistic or creative process. That's not really our domain."

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Genius can flower anywhere, you know, that's why Google wants to give promising startups outside Silicon Valley a chance to explore their ideas. Mountain Valley's particularly eyeing up-and-coming companies from Europe at the moment, so it launched a $100 million venture fund in the region. In an official blog post, Google Ventures Managing Partner Bill Maris says the company believes Europe's startup scene has huge potential. After all, that's where SoundCloud, Spotify and Supercell came from, and these three are now successful tech properties valuing billions of dollars, according to The New York Times. "Our goal is simple," the blog post reads, "we want to invest in the best ideas from the best European entrepreneurs, and help them bring those ideas to life. "

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As a way to help children dealing with cognitive and motor-skill disabilities, researchers from Georgia Tech have developed a rehabilitation tool that pairs a robot and an Android tablet. To demonstrate this system in action, the research team used Angry Birds to let kids teach the humanoid how to play Rovio's popular game. Essentially, the robot is smart enough to learn by simply watching each move the child makes while flinging those birds toward the iconic green pigs. "The robot is able to learn by watching because it knows how interaction with a tablet app is supposed to work," writes project leader Ayanna Howard, a professor at Georgia Tech. "It recognizes that a person touched here and ended there, then deciphers the information that is important and relevant to its progress."

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Netflix-Verizon

Netflix and Verizon have been playing the blame game for months, and despite an April agreement to alleviate the situation customers are still seeing low-res streams and buffering screens (the FCC says it's investigating). Today, Verizon published its own blog post to "dispel the Congestion Myth" with some data that showing why Netflix is responsible for the hangups. Comcast also put the blame on Netflix a few months ago, but Verizon has an infographic. Basically, it says that while the connections Netflix is using are overloaded there are other ways to access its network that are wide open, but Netflix just isn't choosing to take advantage of them. Netflix pointed the finger right back in a statement to Engadget (included in full after the break), citing Verizon's failure to upgrade the connections so users can take advantage of the bandwidth they're paying for.

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