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65th Primetime Emmy Awards - Press Room

Stephen Colbert's no stranger to the internet or technology, but you can't exactly say the same for the show he starts hosting in December. Well ahead of his first night behind the The Late Show desk, CBS has launched an iOS app, new website and a rash of social media accounts bearing Colbert's moniker. Sure, Conan and The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon have their fingers in this pond already, but this move showcases a pretty big generational change when you compare this to the environment David Letterman debuted to in 1993. No disrespect to Letterman, but it's rather refreshing. Oh, and there's a teaser video below in case you're curious about what the former Daily Show correspondent has been up to for the past few months. Spoiler: he has a beard.

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World flags (but mostly from Europe)

There's been a fair share of leaked trade deals raising hackles in recent memory, but the latest could have some big repercussions for your data privacy. WikiLeaks has slipped out details of the in-progress Trade in Services Agreement (TISA), and one of its clauses would prevent the US, European Union and 23 other nations from controlling both where your data is stored as well as whether or not it's accessible from outside of the country. Germany, for example, couldn't demand that Facebook and Google store residents' account information on local servers.

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High-resolution audio is getting a lot buzz as of late thanks to the efforts of Tidal, Neil Young and others. While Tidal had a test of its own, NPR set up another quiz to see if you can tell the difference between MP3s and uncompressed WAVs. I couldn't, and I listened to the samples through a pair of B&O H6s routed through an Apogee Groove DAC/headphone amp. In fact, the only track out of the six in which I was able to accurately identify the uncompressed audio was Katy Perry's "Dark Horse" (oddly enough, I'm a big KP fan). For reference, 320kbps MP3s, which are the mid-grade option here, are what streaming services like Spotify, Rdio and others use for their catalogs.

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This picture released by Edwards Air Force Base 02

According to Air Force Gen. Hawk Carlisle, a USAF intelligence team with the 361st ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Group in Hurlburt Field, FL, uncovered a meaty piece of intel during their routine sweeps of Islamic State-related social media accounts. Apparently someone took a selfie outside of a headquarters building and posted it online. Guess what happened next (you read the headline, right?).

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PlanetSide 2 is massive -- it holds the Guinness World Record for the most players in a single online, first-person shooter battle with 1,158 people -- and it officially launches on PlayStation 4 on June 23rd, completely free to play. It's been in beta on PS4 since January, but the floodgates really open later this month, especially considering you don't need a PlayStation Plus subscription to jump in for free. Developer Daybreak Game Company (formerly Sony Online Entertainment) promises to keep the updates coming on PS4 with holiday content, new features and fresh items.

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Apple TV second-generation

Apple's oft-rumored streaming TV service won't be the only thing going AWOL from the Worldwide Developer Conference next week, it seems. New York Times sources say that 1 Infinite Loop has scrapped plans to unveil revamped Apple TV hardware (along with a matching remote and app development kit) at the gathering. Reportedly, the new media hub just wasn't "ready for prime time" -- it's still coming, but you'll have to wait. There's no mention of when it'll show up. Assuming the leak is accurate in the first place, though, history suggests that Apple could wait until September (when it usually starts releasing its big products for the year) to debut its next-generation set-top box.

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Late last week, I fired my up Mac's Terminal, pecked out a few half-remembered commands, looked them up, typed them out more slowly and that was that. After a few moments of silent finger-crossing, I was the proud owner of a Nexus 6 running the Android M Developer Preview. I then did something I didn't really expect to: I turned off my iPhone and made the snap decision to use Android M -- unfinished as it is -- as my main squeeze until Google I/O came to an end. The show's long over by now, but I've still (mostly) left my iPhone off to see how this highly incomplete version of Android stands up in day-to day-use. And you know what? For something that's very clearly a preview, it doesn't make for a bad daily driver.

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Believe it or not, the surge in online streaming options from Amazon, HBO, Netflix, Hulu and others have yet to outsell DVDs. That'll change this year, though. In a new report from consulting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers, money spent on video downloads and streaming subscriptions in the States will surpass DVD sales and rentals for the first time in 2015. In terms of hard numbers, online video is set to increase 13 percent and rake in $9.5 billion while physical DVD sales are expected to drop to $7.8 billion. What's more, in 2017, the online sales figures are projected to hit the $12 billion mark, which would surpass the US box office tally for theaters. DVDs are hanging tough thanks in part to services like Redbox and Netflix's disc option, but the format stands to meet the same fate as CDs: Music streaming outsold physical CDs last year, and is poised to overtake digital sales within three years.

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The LHC is colliding particles again

What's that strange circular shape, you ask? That, friends, is what particle physics looks like when it's getting back on track. After weeks of test runs following its return to service, the Large Hadron Collider has resumed smashing particles together for the sake of real, honest-to-goodness science experiments -- those criss-crossing lines in the image above are a few of the early collisions. And this time, there's much more energy involved. The LHC is now colliding particles at a level of 13 trillion electron volts, or nearly twice as much energy as it used before its two-year downtime. The boost will hopefully lead to physics discoveries that weren't possible in the previous go-round, which is saying something when some past results were enough to earn a Nobel prize.

[Image credit: CERN]

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Tax Time

The IRS web portal is no digital Fort Knox, officials from IRS watchdog Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) told the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday. In fact, J. Russell George, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration, laid out a strong critique of the tax agency's ability to defend itself from cyber-attacks. Specifically, he cited dozens of security upgrades that had been recommended by his group -- but not implemented by the agency -- that would have reportedly made the most recent data breach "much more difficult" to pull off.

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