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An experimental nail polish line called Undercover Colors can do more than color your nails to match those shoes: it can tell if your drink's been spiked by a dubious date. Just pretend to stir the drink with your finger, and the polish will change color the moment it detects GHB, Rohypnol or Xanax (aka date rape drugs or roofies) in the liquid. Pretty cool, right? And certainly useful, seeing as 1.) date rape drugs are typically odorless and tasteless, and 2.) a recent Washington Post report has revealed that sexual assault cases on college campuses continue to grow from year to year.

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Can you remember the last time you logged into PlayStation Home? Neither can anybody in Japan, apparently. According to a statement released on the Japanese website, the 3D social space will permanently close in March of next year. Sony didn't give a reason for the shuttering, but it's not too much of a surprise, the online hub -- an avatar-filled playground often compared to Second Life was never very popular, and seemingly fell short of the company's expectations. Sony's western divisions haven't announced if a similar shut-down is in store for Home's international versions. Oh, you say you do remember the last time you logged into Home? Well, take comfort in the knowledge that Sony is shutting down the service with a large-scale closing event.

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Google regularly rolls out Chromecast updates that plug up previous root-friendly exploits, but there's a new method you can use if you want complete control over your streaming device. A group of hardware hackers (fail0verflow, Team Eureka and GTVHacker) have not only discovered a vulnerability in the latest Chromecast software, but also developed a way to exploit it and give you root access. This lets you tinker with the HDMI dongle, enable and disable stuff like software auto-updates and change any setting you wish, among other things. The team's calling it "HubCap," and it works on both newly updated and brand new, fresh-out-the-box Chromecasts. You'll need extra hardware to make it happen (a USB development board called Teensy used to root PS3s back in the day), but if you're dead set on rooting your Chromecast, head over to XDA Developers for the full set of instructions.

[Thanks, CJ]

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No one ever said rebooting spaceflight was going to be easy. The SpaceX team might know that better than anyone, especially on a night like this: one of the company's experimental F9R rockets malfunctioned in a test flight over McGregor, Texas and automatically aborted by self-destructing. Thankfully, the system kicked in before the rocket could veer off course, so there were no injuries (or near-injuries, as SpaceX was quick to point out) and no damage was inflicted. At time of writing there's no word on just what sort of anomaly prompted the F9R to terminate its flight, but SpaceX plans to dig into the flight data to figure out just what went south.

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New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is not done scrutinizing Airbnb's and its hosts' business practices just yet. He's now asked the company to hand over full, unredacted personal information on 124 hosts in the state, months after receiving anonymized data on 16,000 New York hosts. Airbnb has already complied (it did notify all 124 first), though it has clarified in a blog post that most of Schneider's targets aren't actively renting out rooms, homes and apartments on its website anymore. Their properties were likely included in the 2,000 sketchy listings the company killed in April for not providing "quality, local experience to guests."

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As great as running is for your health, it can also cause you some pain if not done properly -- like a lot of things in life, overdoing it could turn out unwanted results (hello, shin splints). Thankfully, there's a new Kickstarter project which is looking to alleviate some of these issues. Meet runScribe, a tiny sensor that attaches to your shoes and can measure a total of 13 different data points from how you run. These detailed kinematic metrics are then used to provide runners with specific info about their stride, including pace, stride rate, stride length and what part of the foot is being used the most upon touching ground. Moreover, runScribe plans to use crowdsourced data to, hopefully, help prevent any future injuries for people who run avidly, as it'll be able to narrow down some of the causing factors thanks to the data collected by the wearable -- such as high impact forces, excessive pronation, running surface and, yes, bad shoes. Without a doubt, runScribe certainly has potential, let's just hope it doesn't disappoint like some of the once-promising Kickstarters.

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It's hardly uncommon for smartphone batteries to lose some of their oomph over time, but Apple just might be able to help if your iPhone 5's battery has been flakier than usual. The folks in Cupertino have figured out that some of the iPhone 5s sold between its launch in September 2012 and January 2013 have batteries that may "suddenly experience shorter battery life or need to be charged more frequently" and has kicked off a program to replace them free of charge. Mosey on over to Apple's support page to see if your iPhone 5 is one of the affected units -- if it is and you live in the United States or China, you can reach out and claim your replacement battery right now. What's that you say? You're one of those proactive types and already shelled out money for a replacement? Reach out anyway, because Apple may have a refund waiting for you. Alas, the rest of the world will have to wait just a little bit longer -- Apple plans to launch the program in other countries on August 29th.

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Leica M-P

Digital rangefinder cameras may look like retro fashion items, but they're genuinely handy for pros -- they're good for moments when you need quality without carrying a big, conspicuous DSLR. To that end, Leica has just launched the M-P, a new addition to the M series that's more about serious work than style. You're still getting a 24-megapixel full-frame sensor in a relatively small body, but the buffer memory has doubled to a hefty 2GB; the camera should almost always keep up with your rapid-fire photography. There's also a new selection lever that shows you framing for common focal lengths in the viewfinder, and an anti-reflective coating on the scratch-resistant sapphire LCD will help you review your snaps in bright sunlight.

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For Uber, its rise to the top hasn't always gone smoothly. From facing legal challenges across different parts of the world, to battling it out verbally with competitors, the ridesharing company has had to fight hard to make a name for itself. And now things have apparently taken a turn for the worse, at least for some of its drivers. According to PandoDaily, a number of Uber drivers in Los Angeles say they have been suffering from serious attacks, such as robberies at gunpoint, in recent months. The report, which cites three drivers who spoke on condition of anonymity, claims that people with bad intentions are using the Uber app to locate drivers on a map in order to rob them. While, in most cases, these criminals are looking to steal the Uber-provided phones carried by operators, PandoDaily was told someone was, at one point, the victim of a carjacking situation. Either way, the main concern here shouldn't be the iPhones or vehicles at stake, but rather every driver's safety. We've reached out to Uber for comment and will update this story if we hear back.

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Today, we anticipate the visual glory of Halo 2: Anniversary, learn that a monkey can't own photo rights, sit down without a chair, investigate problems with Secret's anonymity and more! Read on for Engadget's news highlights from the last 24 hours.

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