Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

A new search-and-rescue tech by NASA JPL and Homeland Security found living survivors buried underneath 10 feet of debris in Nepal, proving that it works in real-life situations. The briefcase-like device called Finding Individuals for Disaster and Emergency Response (FINDER) can listen for the heartbeats and breathing of survivors trapped beneath up to 30 feet of rubble, behind 20 feet of solid concrete or within 100 feet in open spaces. It uses microwave-radar technology to look for signs of life, after which one of its components can pinpoint the person's location within five feet. That "locator" was added after a round of tests back in 2013.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

It's been a long wait, but finally CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is back doing what it does best: smashing protons together. The machine was effectively shut down for two years while engineers in Switzerland carried out important upgrades. Scientists started firing proton beams again back in April, but avoided any collisions while they checked the new components were working properly. Now, CERN has announced that it's carrying out proton-proton collisions again. The beams are being fired at a lower energy of 450 gigaelectronvolts (GeV), however, so that CERN can check its particle detection systems are firing correctly. The plan is to ramp up the LHC so it can handle dual proton beams at 6.5 TeV - almost double what it was operating at before the shutdown -- for 13 TeV collisions later this summer. The Higgs boson was discovered last time, so we're hoping something equally remarkable is uncovered during its sophomore season.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

We've seen modern ASCII art in virtual reality before, but until now nothing approaching the works of the masters. With "The Night Cafe" that changes. Strap a mobile VR headset on and you can take a gander through Vincent Van Gogh's Le Café nuit as he might've seen it while at the easel. Waves of light circle out from hanging fixtures and unsurprisingly everything very much has a painterly vibe to it, from the way shading alters the color of the walls to the eerie look in Van Gogh's cold, dead eyes. Wait, what? Well, as Killscreen notes, the project features a number of Easter eggs strewn about from various other Van Gogh works and that includes his self portrait. The brief video below doesn't show if Starry Night made the cut, but artist Mac Cauley says he's still adding to the experience that originated as an entry in this year's Mobile VR Jam.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Siri on an iPhone 5s

Apple doesn't have to rely solely on outside web providers like Google or Microsoft to fuel your iOS and Mac searches. The company has confirmed the rumored existence of Applebot, a web crawler that collects site information for the sake of Siri and Spotlight queries. It behaves much like Google's crawler, looking for the familiar "robots.txt" file that tells it what results to exclude on a given site; it'll follow typical Google instructions if there isn't any Apple-specific rule set. It's not clear how long Cupertino has been running its bot, or whether there's anything more in the works. However, it's evident that Apple wants its online searches to work no matter what its partnerships look like in the future.

0 Comments

If Defcon is the cultural Comic-Con of security conferences, then RSA is more like the business-focused Game Developers Conference (GDC), though largely packed with government-corporate attendees.

At the midpoint of a long day during last month's RSA San Francisco 2015, the largest security conference in the United States (with a record-breaking 33,000 in attendance), Congressman Mike Rogers took the stage to debate in favor of renewing the Patriot Act's Section 215, sometimes called the "library records" provision. "Renewing the Patriot Act" at RSA was about one of our nation's most pivotal public pain points in recent history -- Section 215′s facilitation of bulk telephone record collection. Despite the high-profile nature of this debate and its critical timing, it was a bizarrely toothless, kind of clueless, softball argument that somehow managed to completely avoid discussing why the renewal of this section of the Patriot Act, right now, is such a big deal.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Mophie's cases are a popular choice for adding some extra minutes to your mobile device's battery life. While the company already had both charging and storage options for the iPhone 6, it how offers protection from water damage, too. The H2PROTM accessory not only packs in an additional 2,750 mAh battery, but it's waterproof as well. An IP-68 rated Otterbox-esque design also protects the handset from dirt and drops with easy access to those side-mounted controls and a mute switch. Worried about Touch ID? Mophie's scratch-resistant membrane that covers the screen will still allow you to leverage that feature. What's more, priority-charging tech makes sure your phone charges before the case when plugging in is unavoidable. If you're itchin' to snag one, the Mophie H2PROTM is available for pre-order now for $130 and it's schedule to ship later this month. Unfortunately, there's no word on an iPhone 6 Plus option just yet.

0 Comments

Myst Island

It's a good day for point-and-click fans. After the news that you can now play Grim Fandango Remastered on your morning commute, it seems like the '90s classic Myst is getting its own TV series. According to Deadline, a drama series that explores the origin of the game's eponymous island is coming to streaming service Hulu. For those that don't know, Myst was a huge hit in its day; its innovative storytelling methods and stunning graphics made it the best-selling PC game of the decade.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

ZURICH, SWITZERLAND - MARCH  14, 2014: Google Corporation Building sign.

Last year, Google released internal data revealing that almost all of its workforce was male, and nearly all of them were from either white or Asian backgrounds. In an attempt to make itself more diverse, the company is putting $150 million into programs to help increase the number of female, Black and Hispanic employees. In the run up to having this year's figures released, Google's Nancy Lee sat down with USA Today to talk about what the search engine is aiming for.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Samsung Galaxy S6 camera

When Samsung unveiled the Galaxy S6, you might have noticed that the company stopped touting its in-house ISOCELL camera tech. Was it using relying on someone else's sensor instead? As it turns out, the answer is yes... sort of. The Korean firm has confirmed owners' discoveries that the rear sensor is alternately made by Samsung or Sony. There are "several different vendors" making S6 cameras, a spokesperson says, although there's no mention of how Samsung distributes those components. Not that you'll need to be worried, apparently. The company insists that they all meet "strict global quality and performance standards," and SamMobile has conducted tests showing that the practical differences are slight. In short, you'll likely get quality photos regardless of whose imaging hardware is under the hood.

0 Comments

That people might favor a connected mobile device over a clunky old desktop isn't news. Even in nations where a big boxy computer has long been a thing (unlike, say, in developing nations). Perhaps inevitably, then, Jerry Dischler -- VP of Product Management, Google -- just revealed that "as of today" more searches are originating from smartphones than PCs in at least 10 countries -- and the US is one of 'em. This is more significant given that Google likely doesn't include tablets, either (so it's just phones). Google stopped short of breaking that sign-of-the-times tidbit down any further, but did mention that the trend includes Canada and Japan, too. Is this all that surprising, given we knew that the number of connected phones in people's hands was swelling? Perhaps not, but it does shed light on why search's number one player recently shuffled up its hallowed algorithms to favor mobile friendly sites. And, when Google changes the inner working of search, the internet tends to follow.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Must Reads