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Adobe has been diligent to announce updates to its Photoshop Elements and Premiere Elements offerings in late September, and this year is no different. With the arrival of version 13 of both bits of software, there are even more easy-to-use editing tools for both photos and video clips. In Photoshop Elements 13, Photomerge Compose allows you to quickly snag objects from one snapshot and place them in another, blending color and lighting to make for a realistic final product. The app will also suggest a smattering of crop options to fine-tune compositions, offer Guided Edits, allow you to "nudge" selection boundaries and it serves up a handful of options when a single effect is selected. To boost your video efforts in Premiere Elements 13, Video Story lends a hand with editing footage from major life events. There's also quick clip selection, Shake Stabilizer to make the most out of shaky action cam footage and Guided Edits to help with titles and effects. Mobile device syncing got a boost across the board as well, and Elements Live provides tutorials, support and inspiration from right inside the apps. Adobe is set to ship Photoshop and Premiere Elements 13 in Q4 2014 with a $150 price tag.

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The Apple logo outside of a flagship sto

Want to make a digital magazine but Apple's iBook Author app just doesn't offer what you want? Then perhaps Cupertino's latest buy could signal a coming change that'll help you out. The iPhone company has purchased Prss, the digital publishing outfit behind Trvl, which TechCrunch notes was the first iPad-only newsstand publication way back in 2010. Prss' niche is that it allows you to make snazzy-looking iPad mags without needing to know any coding. The news started as an anonymously-sourced report from Dutch iOS blog, iCulture, but Apple confirmed the vowel-averse company's acquisition to TC, stating that it buys smaller tech firms from time to time and "generally do [does] not discuss our [its] plans or purposes." Here's to hoping that this pick-up is a bit less tumultuous than Tim Cook's last purchase.

[Image credit: AFP/Getty Images]

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Samsung gave us a glimpse at its next smartwatch (there have been a few) during IFA, and tonight there's news that, surprise, you'll be able to buy and use the Gear S in the US this fall. This one is special because unlike most other watches, it can connect to 3G data by itself when the wearer's phone isn't around. There's little in the way of details, but it's coming on all four major carriers -- AT&T, Verizon, Sprint and T-Mobile -- and the company promises more information "soon." You can check out our experiences at typing out emails on its two-inch AMOLED screen right here, and decide if it's worth picking up this Tizen OS device instead of the Apple Watch (or any of the other wearables either coming soon or already here).

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Head's up, whistleblowers: you're only as good as your backup plan, and one service has set up shop on the dark web to help you spill the beans in case you're "hurt, jailed, or even killed for trying to render a genuine and risky service to our free society." Meet Dead Man Zero. For the low, low price of 0.3 Bitcoins (at time of writing, that works out to just over $130), you can have digital dead man's switch to make sure that word gets out about what you were working on... and just maybe who may have been behind your disappearance or demise.

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iPhone 6 showing a picture of a padlock

As a matter of course, virtually all the internet-capable hardware you use supports trusted certificates, or proofs that secure data connections (such as those for apps and websites) should be legitimate. Have you ever wondered exactly how much faith your gadgets place in others, however? Thanks to Karl Kornel, we now have a good sense of how iOS 8 devices fare -- and apparently, they trust a lot of organizations. Apple's latest mobile software has no less than 222 certificates that greenlight data sharing. Most of these are from companies you'd expect to oversee security on iPads and iPhones, including Symantec's various brands (35 certificates) and Apple itself (five). However, there are also quite a few governments that also get iOS' all-clear in certain circumstances, including China, Japan, the Netherlands, Taiwan, Turkey and the US.

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Contour Roam3 action camera

Contour came back from the dead this spring, but the first action cameras it sold upon its revival were simply old models from 2012 -- that's not much help if you're a loyal fan looking to upgrade. As of today, though, there's finally a brand new Contour cam to buy: meet the ROAM3. It's not a huge break from the ROAM2 at first glance, as it can still record 1080p video at 30fps (720p video at 60fps) with its 270-degree rotating lens. However, it's much more resilient than its ancestor; it can survive 30 feet underwater without using a waterproof case, which could make it a good match for your next surfing movie. It's hard to say if the ROAM3 can lure you away from GoPro's offerings, but its $200 price (which includes an 8GB memory card and two mounts) is low enough that it won't hurt too much to give Contour another try.

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Does your love for exotic sports cars bleed over into every aspect of your life? If so, you might like Blackberry's new $2,000 Porsche-designed smartphone. That's not all we have on deck, though. Read on for the rest of our news highlights from the last 24 hour.

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Not sure if you want to hide your shiny new iPhone's newfangled design in a bulky case? Maybe you should -- apparently, it's quite pliable. iPhone 6 and 6 Plus users on Twitter seem to be finding small, but noticeable bends just south of the handsets' volume controls. Front-pocket storage is all it takes to give the handset a gentle slope, according to some users, but it can be bent other ways too. Back pockets and malicious YouTube users (video from Unbox Therapy after the break) can both bend the device to their will.

Update: Just for kicks, the same guy tried the same thing with a Galaxy Note 3, and while its plastic frame gave some squeaking under the pressure, it showed only slight warping after two attempts. There's the difference in materials to account for, but of course we're not surprised -- we've seen how Samsung tests its large phones under pressure.

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Microhip. Digitally Generated Image isolated on white background

If you have any smart device -- be it a phone, tablet, router, wearable or otherwise -- there's a good chance ARM's Cortex lineup is responsible for the brains behind the scenes. The company just announced the latest processor in its M-series, which is a set of low-power processors capable of handling embedded devices like smart home appliances, drones, automotive and wearables, which is focused on making said devices even more powerful. The M7, as it's called, comes with a 400MHz processor, packing more than twice the punch as the 168MHz M4 that came before it (and will continue to be available to manufacturers). It comes with support for more displays, motors, voice controls, connectivity, audio performance and improved GPS accuracy. In other words, the infamous Internet of Things should become even stronger and more powerful. ARM says that manufacturers are already building devices with the chip embedded, so it won't be long before we get to see if the extra power actually makes a difference in our everyday lives.

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Karma Go LTE hotspot

Karma's concept of a shareable mobile hotspot is clever -- you not only get data wherever you go, but you get some of it for free if you're kind enough to share with others. The service wasn't very alluring when it was using Sprint's pokey old WiMAX network, however, which is why the company has just unveiled a much-needed LTE hotspot, the Karma Go. You can now hop online (or invite others to do the same) at a far quicker 6-8Mbps typical speed, with much better coverage to boot.

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