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Want to make sure your newborn baby's jaundice-free? There's an app for that! A team of researchers from the University of Washington have developed an app that can diagnose jaundice among infants just by taking their pictures. Since the condition's typically diagnosed by the excessive yellowing of one's skin, it's not too odd to develop a tool that can detect it with just a snapshot, just like that app that can spot skin cancer through a smartphone. You simply place a color calibration card (which helps the software determine lighting and flash conditions, as well as account for the baby's skintone) on the baby's tummy, take a picture and then upload it to the cloud for analysis. The algorithm quickly does its job, and you get the results and the baby's bilirubin levels almost instantly.

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Schrodinger's cat, the good ole thought experiment that's been twisting (non-Quantum physicist) brains for decades. Scientists might have just caught it. Or not. Typical. What you see above is a combined image where a stencil was bombarded with cosmic rays photons, but the photons that generated the image actually never interacted with the stencil -- stay with us. It was separate photons (which shared the same quantum state as the ones that hit the camera) which arrived at the stencil. The science goes that when two separate particles are entangled, their physical properties appear to correlate and they share a single quantum state.

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Envious of Android's stream-wrangling AllCast app, but not ready to switch mobile platforms? You're in luck: the app's creator just teased the iOS version of the app on his Google+ page. A pair of screenshots (featured above) shows the work-in-progress, punctuated only with developer Koushik Dutta's brief commentary: "Slowly but surely." The port was apparently sparked by a handful of new iOS8 APIs that it possible to cast from other apps besides AllCast. So, when will it be here? Dutta says he hopes to release the app in a few weeks, possibly the end of September.

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Surgeons and medical assistant wearing mask and uniform operating patient.?

For all the advancements we've made with technology and medicine, a cure for cancer still eludes us. But maybe that's because we haven't enlisted nanoparticles to attack tumors just yet. New research from the University of California's Davis Cancer Center, spotted by PhysOrg, suggest that could be a reality sometime soon. By attaching a tumor-recognition module to a nanorobot, doctors would be able to both diagnose a cancerous growth and inject drugs directly into the carcinoma. This would effectively target only the malignant cells and leave the surrounding areas unharmed -- taking things a few steps further than, say, the nanodiamonds we've heard of. It's a stark contrast to how chemotherapy treatment typically works, too, which is a blanket attack on all of a certain type of cell that often inflicts as much collateral damage as it does good. Who knows, a world where cancer patients don't have their hair or bone marrow destroyed during treatment might not be too far off after all.

[Image credit: Shutterstock / StockLite]

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Windows Store on a Toshiba Encore -- hey, that rhymes

You may have heard that the Windows Store has a serious problem with counterfeit apps; for every legitimate title, there's seemingly a horde of fakes meant solely to take your money and run. At last, though, Microsoft has detailed what it's doing to cull these scams from its shop. To begin with, it recently toughened up the requirements so that app categories, icons and names reflect what you're really getting; hopefully, you'll see less junk going forward. The folks in Redmond are also scouring the existing catalog, and have pulled 1,500 apps so far. There's still a long way to go (search for "iTunes" and you'll see plenty of copyright abuse), but this represents a good start.

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Olympus PEN E-PL7

Even Olympus can't resist the allure of selfies, it seems. The company has just unveiled the PEN E-PL7, a retro-tinged mirrorless camera whose centerpiece is a 3-inch flip-out LCD that makes those trendy self-portraits a little easier. When you swing out the display, it kicks into a "Selfie Mode" which lets you tap the screen to capture a slightly time-delayed (and hopefully, better-prepared) shot. There's a selfie interval option to snap successive photos in different poses, and powered zoom lenses will automatically kick into a wide-angle view to make sure your pretty face is in the frame.

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SKOREA-ECONOMY

Unless you've made a habit of carrying around a solar charger, topping off your phone outdoors can be a bit of a challenge. Well, unless you're living in South Korea. The city of Seoul just announced that it's building a series of outdoor recharging stations along the Cheonggyecheon, a manmade stream in the city's downtown area. The chargers won't draw from the city's power grid, however -- they'll draw current from a collection of hydroelectric turbines embedded in the stream. The project's developer says the stations will be able to fully charge most devices in 2-3 hours. If the five stations currently in production turn out to be a hit, the city says it will consider expanding the network. See? Low battery life is no excuse for avoiding the great outdoors.

[Image credit: AFP/Getty Images]

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Ugh. Landlords from hell. They leave doors damaged and plumbing to rot, don't care that killer molds are growing behind the walls, and in NYC, they couldn't care less if you freeze in the winter. Since it's darn hard getting an inspector to come and verify a heat violation, a new KickStarter project called Heat Seek NYC wants to give people the power to gather their own evidence using simple internet-connected temperature sensors. These Heat Seek sensors constantly monitor indoor temperature and upload the results online like Nest does, so they can be accessed through an app monitored, say, by a lawyer building a tenant's case.

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Samsung is taking the wraps off of yet another new smartwatch, but the Gear S (not Solo) has a twist: there's a 3G modem inside. While it may not be especially fast, that means that even when outside the range of a Bluetooth-connected phone or WiFi, it can still send and receive messages or make calls. It has a 2-inch AMOLED screen plus a dual-core 1GHz CPU inside along with GPS, heart rate and motion sensors, all powered by a 300mAh battery Samsung says can last up to two days. It runs Tizen instead of Android Wear, with pedestrian navigation available from from Nokia's HERE and support for Facebook. In the run up to IFA next week Samsung is also bringing the Gear Circle headset (yes, we also figured they'd save that name for a round watch) that pairs with a phone over Bluetooth, letting users hear notifications, use voice commands or listen to music through the earbuds.

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Not one to wait around for trade shows to officially begin before flaunting its new products to the world, LG is no longer teasing the G Watch R, its upcoming circular Android Wear smartwatch -- it's showing it off in all its glory. And just as the company hinted at on Sunday, it comes with a 1.3-inch Plastic OLED (P-OLED) full 360-degree display. LG says that it isn't trying to replace the original G Watch, but rather offer another choice: The R is an elegant device that looks and feels more like a classic watch than its squarish predecessor. Good timing, too, since it's going to be competing head-to-head (wrist-to-wrist?) against the Moto 360, a similarly shaped watch that will likely be available next week.

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