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According to Air Force Gen. Hawk Carlisle, a USAF intelligence team with the 361st ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Group in Hurlburt Field, FL, uncovered a meaty piece of intel during their routine sweeps of Islamic State-related social media accounts. Apparently someone took a selfie outside of a headquarters building and posted it online. Guess what happened next (you read the headline, right?).

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PlanetSide 2 is massive -- it holds the Guinness World Record for the most players in a single online, first-person shooter battle with 1,158 people -- and it officially launches on PlayStation 4 on June 23rd, completely free to play. It's been in beta on PS4 since January, but the floodgates really open later this month, especially considering you don't need a PlayStation Plus subscription to jump in for free. Developer Daybreak Game Company (formerly Sony Online Entertainment) promises to keep the updates coming on PS4 with holiday content, new features and fresh items.

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Apple TV second-generation

Apple's oft-rumored streaming TV service won't be the only thing going AWOL from the Worldwide Developer Conference next week, it seems. New York Times sources say that 1 Infinite Loop has scrapped plans to unveil revamped Apple TV hardware (along with a matching remote and app development kit) at the gathering. Reportedly, the new media hub just wasn't "ready for prime time" -- it's still coming, but you'll have to wait. There's no mention of when it'll show up. Assuming the leak is accurate in the first place, though, history suggests that Apple could wait until September (when it usually starts releasing its big products for the year) to debut its next-generation set-top box.

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Late last week, I fired my up Mac's Terminal, pecked out a few half-remembered commands, looked them up, typed them out more slowly and that was that. After a few moments of silent finger-crossing, I was the proud owner of a Nexus 6 running the Android M Developer Preview. I then did something I didn't really expect to: I turned off my iPhone and made the snap decision to use Android M -- unfinished as it is -- as my main squeeze until Google I/O came to an end. The show's long over by now, but I've still (mostly) left my iPhone off to see how this highly incomplete version of Android stands up in day-to day-use. And you know what? For something that's very clearly a preview, it doesn't make for a bad daily driver.

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Believe it or not, the surge in online streaming options from Amazon, HBO, Netflix, Hulu and others have yet to outsell DVDs. That'll change this year, though. In a new report from consulting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers, money spent on video downloads and streaming subscriptions in the States will surpass DVD sales and rentals for the first time in 2015. In terms of hard numbers, online video is set to increase 13 percent and rake in $9.5 billion while physical DVD sales are expected to drop to $7.8 billion. What's more, in 2017, the online sales figures are projected to hit the $12 billion mark, which would surpass the US box office tally for theaters. DVDs are hanging tough thanks in part to services like Redbox and Netflix's disc option, but the format stands to meet the same fate as CDs: Music streaming outsold physical CDs last year, and is poised to overtake digital sales within three years.

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The LHC is colliding particles again

What's that strange circular shape, you ask? That, friends, is what particle physics looks like when it's getting back on track. After weeks of test runs following its return to service, the Large Hadron Collider has resumed smashing particles together for the sake of real, honest-to-goodness science experiments -- those criss-crossing lines in the image above are a few of the early collisions. And this time, there's much more energy involved. The LHC is now colliding particles at a level of 13 trillion electron volts, or nearly twice as much energy as it used before its two-year downtime. The boost will hopefully lead to physics discoveries that weren't possible in the previous go-round, which is saying something when some past results were enough to earn a Nobel prize.

[Image credit: CERN]

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Tax Time

The IRS web portal is no digital Fort Knox, officials from IRS watchdog Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) told the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday. In fact, J. Russell George, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration, laid out a strong critique of the tax agency's ability to defend itself from cyber-attacks. Specifically, he cited dozens of security upgrades that had been recommended by his group -- but not implemented by the agency -- that would have reportedly made the most recent data breach "much more difficult" to pull off.

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Xiaomi Mi Band next to an Mi4

Which company do you think is the fast-rising upstart in the wearable world? Fitbit? Jawbone? None of the above, if you ask IDC. It estimates that China's Xiaomi claimed 24.6 percent of the wearable device market in the first quarter of 2015, which is no mean feat when the company didn't even start shipping its first wrist-worn gadget, the Mi Band, until the second half of last year. That still amounts to just 2.8 million devices, but it was enough to shrink the market share for virtually everyone else, including industry leader Fitbit as well as Garmin, Samsung and Jawbone. And Samsung is the only smartwatch maker on the list, we'd add. LG, Motorola, Pebble and other early entrants are lumped into the "others" group.

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Monterey Bay Aquarium's autonomous underwater vehicle

Robotic underwater vehicles from the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Research Institute just helped discover one of the Earth's more elusive scientific treasures. Both an autonomous mapping craft and a remotely operated counterpart (which collected video and samples) traveled 12,500 feet to the bottom of Mexico's Pescadero Basin to find the Pacific's deepest hot hydrothermal vents. The machines achieved their feat in just two days, versus the years that it'd take for conventional undersea mapping -- and they achieved the kind of detail that would likely be difficult or impossible using those earlier techniques.

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FBI Surveillance Flights

Thanks to an Associated Press report, we now know more about the FBI's fleet of small surveillance planes that are flying over US cities. It's no secret the aircraft have been used for years to aid the Bureau's efforts on the ground, but recent flights were equipped with cameras and cellphone-tracking technology. The FBI says mass surveillance isn't the purpose of the group of mostly Cessnas (like the one above), maintaining the gear is only used for ongoing investigations -- more often than not, without a warrant. The FBI isn't denying the existence of the aircraft, but the AP linked the fleet to at least 13 fake companies that coordinated over 100 flights in 11 states during a 30-day span starting near the end of April. According to the Bureau, measures are taken for "operational security purposes" and for pilot safety. The FBI also says the phone-tracking tech is rarely used. However, much like the its Stingray devices, the cellphones of nearby people are caught up in the net -- not just the intended target.

[Image credit: AP Photo/Andrew Harnik]

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