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"What do we want to do with this technology? We want to weaponize it." That's how a US Air Force spokesman described a hypersonic weapon project based on the experimental X-51A WaveRider. It would use "scramjet," or supersonic ramjet technology, that has no moving parts and compresses air by sheer velocity after it's accelerated to at least Mach 4 by a rocket. During tests in 2013, the WaveRider set a record by flying at Mach 5.1 (3,400mph) for over three minutes after it was dropped from a B-2H bomber. However, those trials were just a proof-of-concept, and the Air Force has teamed up with DARPA take the technology to the next level.

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Taiwan's big tech trade show isn't just about CEOs shouting about its newest laptops and tablets. It's also the place for execs to shake hands, make deals and do ole' fashioned business. One deal is putting Tobii's eye-tracking tech inside a high-end MSI gaming hardware. Yep, it's a concept, but it's underscored by a deal to work together on developing eye-tracking in gaming hardware in the future. But we're not really about doing deals and shaking hands, we're about stabbing enemy soldiers and hiding in haystacks, which is where the Assassins' Creed demo came in. The trio of short-range infrared sensors monitor your eye movement, which (at least how they're utilized in this particular game) allow you to adjust your field of vision to where you want to in the game. Instead of rotation the camera with a mouse or buttons, you simply look to where you want to, and the detection software kicks in and sweeping the camera to where you (more often than not) wanted it to.

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Oculus' big push into cinema began at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival, where it introduced its VR filmmaking endeavor, Story Studio. Back then, the company debuted Lost and revealed a list of other shorts it had plans for -- though it didn't go into much detail about them. Today, however, we're getting to know Henry, the second film from the virtual reality studio. Directed by Ramiro Lopes Dau, who previously worked on animation for Pixar's Brave and Monster University, Henry tells the story of a cute hedgehog that has trouble making friends because of his appearance. Oculus Story Studio describes it as a heartwarming comedy.

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Amazon Fire TV gamepad

Amazon's Fire TV devices may be focused primarily on Android games, but they can now do some PC gaming in a pinch. The media hubs have just scored an exclusive GameFly app that streams a mix of PC titles (such as the Batman series and Dirt 3) in subscription-based game packs starting at $7 a month. Suffice it to say you'll want to snag a gamepad if you're going to use this feature at all. No, this probably won't make you forget about dedicated consoles or NVIDIA's Shield, but it's a big deal if the Fire TV is your only living room game machine.

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As we heard from Intel at its Computex keynote, the merger between A4WP (Alliance for Wireless Power) and PMA (Power Matters Alliance) is finally a signed deal as of today, which is a big step toward delivering the next generation of wireless power -- one that can transmit farther while also covering a wider range of wattage -- to consumers. Intel's SVP Kirk Skaugen, the very same man who's been pushing for the totally wireless PC since last year's Computex (the photo sort of explains why), added that we'll be seeing this magnetic resonance technology, aka Rezence, being integrated into next year's laptops, keyboard, mice and other devices. For those who can't wait, the exec also expects to see Rezence-enabled add-ons for mobile devices during the transitional period. "This will be a journey just like Centrino: We didn't invent wireless notebooks; we just made wireless ubiquitous."

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NASA tests the RS-25 rocket at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi

If you thought NASA's recent booster rocket test for the Space Launch System was full of sound and fury, just wait until you see what happens with the main engines. The agency recently conducted a nearly 8-minute burn test for the RS-25 rocket providing the SLS' core thrust, and the machinery isn't exactly subtle -- as you'll see in the video below, it produced a gigantic steam cloud that seemingly dwarfed the complex. Of course, this dry run wasn't really for show. NASA needed to prove that the RS-25's automated propulsion (which adjusts things like fuel mixture based on throttle demands) will work without a hitch when it's lifting payloads destined for places like Mars. And it's important to note that this is just one of four primary rockets in the SLS. When the finished rocket launches in 2018, it'll put out a fierce 1.6 million pounds of thrust that could make this demo seem timid by comparison.

[Image credit: NASA]

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A team of scientists wants to quickly drive down the cost of renewable energy to the point that it's cheaper than coal within ten years' time. In order to do that, though, they need money -- lots and lots of money to the tune of $150 billion. That's why they founded the Global Apollo Programme, named as such because (in the words of one of the founders, Richard Layard of the London School of Economics ) "The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon." The researchers envision the program as a collaboration between several nations, funding research that will make renewable energy a much more feasible option.

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The Xbox and PlayStation booths at E3 2014

If you've ever followed the Electronic Entertainment Expo (aka E3) closely, you know that there are a lot of events taking place in a short space of time: press conferences, live booth presentations and legions of game premieres. How in the world are you supposed to watch it all? We'll be on the ground, of course, but YouTube wants to help as well. It's launching an E3 2015 hub that will stream "all" the big press conferences (such as Microsoft, Sony, EA and Ubisoft), the Nintendo World Championships, loads of booth events and first-time "let's play" sessions. YouTube might not have the same lock on live game steaming that Twitch does, but it could get a lot of your attention when E3 kicks off in mid-June.

[Image credit: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong]

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