Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

Whether you're a budding photojournalist or just want to document the semester with something better than a smartphone camera, we've got some great picks for you. Our most affordable recommendation will set you back less than $200, while you'll find an SLR kit that almost tops $3,000 at the other end of the spectrum. Head to the gallery below to see them all, and don't forget to peruse the rest of our guide!

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

After a few years finding itself/getting a heavy-duty industrial makeover, Alienware's well-respected (and, importantly, customizable) desktop gaming PC has returned. The Area-51 isn't small, but it now has a new triangular... hexagonal... something-between-the-two design, intentionally hewn that way to maintain airflow and keep it cool, even when positioned against a wall. It's certainly come a long way since the tower desktop days of 2011. Given its size, two of the corners have handles to lug it around with -- we hope you can bicep-curl 45 pounds though, because that's how much it weights. It also looks nothing like Alienware's incoming Steam Machine. (Ironically, the new Area-51 chassis looks far more "Valve," in a lot of ways.)

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Adobe's Photoshop Mix offering for Apple's slates arrived a few months back alongside its Ink and Slide drawing tools, and it's not letting the app sit too long before adding new features. The latest version adds an undo/redo option that'll help with missteps, swaps background/foreground images by dragging thumbnails and saves full-res JPEG and PNG files to that iPad you're working on. For those of us that don't keep a lot of work files on our tablets, you can now import images from your Dropbox repository to edit or add to Creative Cloud-stored PSDs whilst on-the-go. The update is now available over at iTunes, so if your device hasn't yet alerted you or if you've yet to take the slate-style editing for a spin, have at it.

0 Comments

Sprint-HQ

There's just enough time to pop off for a far-flung holiday before summer ends, and Sprint's trying to make calling home from Guangzhou a little easier. The canary-hued carrier announced the other day that it's launching free international WiFi calling for a handful of compatible Android smartphones. For better or worse, some older hardware is getting the nod first: Samsung's Spark-friendly Galaxy S 4 will get the update before the ten other devices capable of making WiFi calls. Curiously enough, the name Sprint chose is actually sort of a misnomer. Yes, you can gab with your folks back home over WiFi, but you can fire off messages free of charge too. Just remember that it's only WiFi calls to the US from abroad that don't cost anything -- WiFi calling Bangkok from the States will hit your wallet, as will international Wi-Fi calls to non-US numbers. Got it? Good.

0 Comments

A pile of US currency, topped with a mobile phone, reminds us that money talks and can be very persuasive!

It doesn't yet have a name, but Ecuador's new government-backed virtual currency is coming. That's the thrust of a new report from the Associated Press, anyway -- the country's Central Bank is said to be gearing up for a launch sometime in December, though the juicy technical details and the mechanics of how citizens can get their metaphorical hands on these things are still shrouded in mystery. What does seem clear at this point is that Ecuador's current cash (in the form of US dollars) isn't going anywhere, and that people will be able to conduct transactions with each other from their mobile phones without big fees eating into them. If everything goes according to plan, this'd be the first time a national government has launched its own official digital currency, though that's not to say some cryptocurrency nuts haven't aimed to affect change on a national scale. Enthusiasts in the Czech Republic launched the CzechCrownCoin a few days ago in a bid to bolster online business in the country, and the Auroracoin folks made the virtual equivalent of $380 available to all the fine folks of Iceland... only to see its value tank over time.

0 Comments

There aren't more electric cars because there's no infrastructure, but there's no infrastructure because there's no demand. It's this chicken-and-egg problem that Elon Musk is hoping to end, at least in China, after a signing a deal that'll see Tesla open 400 charging stations in the country. The car maker has signed a deal with state-owned mobile network China Unicom, which'll see the latter business providing space at its retail locations for Tesla owners to re-juice at. The pair aim to have stations with two or more charging points up and running in 20 cities by the end of the year, with 100 further cities coming on board in the future. Why would a national phone carrier get involved in the auto industry? Unicom executive Jiang Zhengxin believes that the team-up will allow "effective use of the infrastructure" plus, hey, it's a nice bit of free publicity. Xinhua News, meanwhile, believes that the move will supercharge (pun intended) China's push towards green vehicles as a solution to its pollution problem.

0 Comments

Today Mikael Hed announced he would be stepping down as CEO of Rovio and that former Nokia exec Pekka Rantala would be taking his place in 2015. The developer has quickly gone from being a company that no one had ever heard of to one of the biggest names in mobile gaming. How? Almost entirely on the strength of its flagship franchise: Angry Birds. The problem is, nearly five years on, the Angry Birds name just isn't enough any more. The developer continues to churn out new titles at a fairly regular clip, but many are simple rehashes of the standard formula it debuted in 2009 (see Angry Birds Star Wars, Transformers, Rio, Space, Friends and Seasons). And with profits dropping off at an alarming rate the company is at something of a crossroads. In 2013 the company made less than half of what it raked in during 2012. If the company wants to avoid the fate of Zynga, which quickly fell apart after going public, it needs to change now before its problems become unfixable. Whether or not Rantala, who most recently was CEO at Finnish beverage company Hartwall, can save Rovio from the dustbin of history remains to be seen. But one thing is for sure, if he can stop just one more licensed Angry Birds game from being made, the world will be a better place.

0 Comments

Microsoft retiring Messenger on March 15th, wants you to use Skype instead

Microsoft's 15-year-old MSN Messaging service will soon be a part of computer lore. It has been shut down in most places for over a year, but Microsoft kept it running in China where it was still quite popular. However, with the advent of Tencent's QQ, Line and other services, Redmond recently emailed Chinese users (on their Hotmail accounts, naturally) that the service would ride into the sunset on October 31st. To give you an idea of how old it is, the service was created in 1999 by Microsoft to compete against AOL's AIM chat service (disclaimer: AOL is Engadget's parent company). However, we doubt too many users will get misty-eyed about its demise -- the only nostalgia we have is how difficult it was to get rid of.

0 Comments

Nintendo releases recorded video presentations, known as "Nintendo Direct," pretty often. Usually they're focused on games, or they highlight an upcoming season's game releases. This morning, however, Nintendo revealed two new versions of its wildly successful 3DS portable game console. And just like the Mario series, Nintendo's not pulling any punches when it comes to naming conventions: the new 3DS is simply called "New" 3DS. And yes, there's a "New" version of the larger 3DS XL, too.

As seen above, the smaller "New" 3DS has Super Nintendo-themed buttons on the right side. Just above those buttons is a new, tiny analog stick. Bizarrely, Nintendo's president Satoru Iwata compared the new analog stick to the GameCube controller's yellow C-stick (which was rarely used in GameCube games).

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Nokia's HERE Maps Comes to Samsung Galaxy Devices

Relations between Google and Samsung are already a little tense, but the Korean smartphone maker may just have elevated those frustrations a little further. Extending its existing deal to provide mapping data on Samsung's Tizen wearables, Nokia (the part that wasn't sold to Microsoft) today confirmed that it will bring Here Maps to Android for the first time, giving Samsung Galaxy smartphone owners advanced access to its own Google Maps alternative.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Must Reads