When researchers at the University of Oxford needed to precisely sync high-speed video with high resolution stills, they had a hell of a time finding an off-the-shelf solution that worked with any degree of accuracy. Instead, the crazy kids hacked together a home cinema projector and a consumer-level digicam to split every frame of video captured by the camera into sixteen frames (albeit with lower resolution). Once that goes down, the frames can either be played in succession for up to 400 fps video, or assembled into one high-res still image. Although originally designed for research purposes -- to capture images of cells or the human heart in action, for instance -- the team is betting that the tech has applications ranging from CCTV to sports photography. For more info, check out the video after the break. [Warning: source link requires subscription]

Notion Ink Adam hands-on (with video) at MWC 2010