Still wondering if the future of display linkage really lies in DisplayPort? Hard to say for sure, but IDT's definitely making a good case for it with its latest demonstration. Integrated Device Technology has seemingly figured out how to shuffle touch information through DisplayPort's existing auxiliary channel, which simplifies and lowers the cost of integrating touch technology into tablets, laptops, AIO PCs, monitors, etc. It's being hailed as the world's first usage of the DisplayPort AUX channel to carry touch screen data, and if the prototype proves solid, it'll allow laptop manufacturers to eliminate USB interface communication from host to panel and reduce the number of wires that must pass through the display's hinge. And you know what that means -- slimmer, more flexible designs. IDT's not barking about a release date for its latest trick, but we're guessing it'll have display makers begging for access in no time flat.
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IDT Demonstrates World's First Touch-Over-AUX DisplayPort™-Based Touch Screen Technology

IDT Mixed Signal Total System Solution Demonstration Leverages DisplayPort Auxiliary Channel to Transmit Touch Screen Data to the Operating System for Tablet, Notebook, and AiO Devices
2011 International CES


SAN JOSE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Integrated Device Technology, Inc. (IDT®) (NASDAQ:IDTI), the Analog and Digital Company™ delivering essential mixed-signal semiconductor solutions, today announced it has demonstrated the world's first usage of the DisplayPort auxiliary (AUX) channel to carry touch screen data. The demonstration implements a novel technique for transmitting the touch sensor data over the existing DisplayPort AUX channel to the operating system (OS), simplifying and lowering the cost to integrate touch technology into display devices such as tablets, notebooks, All-in-One (AiO) devices, monitors, kiosks, and point-of-sale (POS) terminals. The demonstration took place during the 2011 International Consumer Electronics show in Las Vegas on January 6-9, 2011.

"To achieve this, AMD provided tools to IDT to enable the tunneling of touch data over the GPU's embedded DisplayPort AUX channel. This implementation can reduce overall system cost, spacing requirements and potentially save power."

The technology demonstration utilizes the IDT VPP1101 DisplayPort receiver connected to a field programmable gate array (FPGA) that is programmed to interface with the touch sensor's SPI output and the IDT VDAP1000, a monolithic timing controller, white LED driver, and power management device. The discrete prototype demonstration functions to transmit the touch sensor data over the DisplayPort AUX channel while driving the digital and analog needs of the LCD panel. This technology will enable notebook system manufacturers to eliminate USB interface communication from host to panel and reduce the number of wires that must pass through the display's hinge, simplifying the design and reducing costs. Likewise, integration of a touch sensor controller alongside a DisplayPort-based LCD timing controller (TCON) will benefit panel manufacturers by reducing IC component count and simplifying the overall system, resulting in lower system cost and smaller physical dimensions.

"Most existing touch sensor controllers require extra USB cables, ports and components to integrate touch sensor functionality with the display. IDT's approach eliminates these cost adders by leveraging the benefits of DisplayPort," said Ji Park, vice president and general manager of the Video and Display Operation at IDT. "By using the DisplayPort AUX channel to transmit the touch data back to the host, no new wiring or ports are required. IDT's technology simplifies the hardware requirements and lowers the overall solution cost."

"AMD (NYSE:AMD) understands the growing trend of touch enabled devices and foresees the need to enable more efficient designs," said David Cummings, director, Technology Management, AMD. "To achieve this, AMD provided tools to IDT to enable the tunneling of touch data over the GPU's embedded DisplayPort AUX channel. This implementation can reduce overall system cost, spacing requirements and potentially save power."

This latest technology migration extends the previous mixed signal innovations that IDT has pioneered through integration of power management and LED backlight technology into its timing controllers. The touch-over-AUX demonstration offers the possibility of further integration to solve system level problems with mixed-signal technology. IDT's analog and digital expertise coupled with a total-system-solution approach will continue to lead the technology in this market.

To learn more about IDT's video and display solutions, visit www.idt.com/go/display.

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IDT transmit touch information over DisplayPort's auxiliary channel