Fall Out Boy's Joe Trohman on the NES console and its Power Glove peripheral

Every week, a new and interesting human being tackles our decidedly geeky take on the Proustian Q&A. This is the Engadget Questionnaire.

In the latest installment of our collection of gadget-related queries, Fall Out Boy guitarist Joe Trohman chats about his gear wish list and Bluetooth fashion sense. Join us on the other side of the break for the full gamut of responses.

Fall Out Boy's Joe Trohman on the NES console and its Power Glove peripheralWhat gadget do you depend on most?
My iPhone. I rely far too much on it... sadly.

Which do you look back upon most fondly?
Probably my NES. First serious gaming system I ever had.

Which company does the most to push the industry?
Apple without a doubt. I feel like every new gadget that comes out is trying to compete with their products. They're always setting the bar, and then raising it.

What is your operating system of choice?
OS X.

What are your favorite gadget names?
Put a lower-case "i" in front of it and I'll probably gravitate towards it. I also think "Clam Case" is a pretty funny name.

Which app do you depend on most?
Echofon and Instagram on my iPhone are used on the daily. I also use the Korg Polysix and Figure by Reason on my iPad a fair amount.

What traits do you most deplore in a smartphone?
I'll never like virtual keypads. Nothing can compete with an actual QWERTY-style keypad. That's where you have to start debating function over form.

Which do you most admire?
I guess the entire idea of having a hand-held, sleek, touchscreen computer in my pocket. The all-in-one aspect is wonderful. Outside of the messy keypad of course.

What is your idea of the perfect device?
I feel like the iPhone and iPad are incredibly close. If I run a serious DAW [digital audio workstation] with real-deal plugins on an iPad, I'd be in heaven when it comes to recording on the road. Also, if the touchscreen keypad / keyboard was more accurate.

Fall Out Boy's Joe Trohman on the NES console and its Power Glove peripheral

What is your earliest gadget memory?
Probably an NES. Or if we're talking accessories, the NES gun or Power Glove. If we're talking something more "all-in-one" portable, then an Nintendo Game Boy. Computer-wise, Apple //e that my dad brought home from work.

What technological advancement do you most admire?
I feel like touchscreen technology blows my mind still. It just makes me think of all of the sci-fi films I enjoyed as a kid. It's come to life now. Outside of that, when it comes to recording, I'm pretty impressed with companies like Apogee that keep making seriously powerful recording interfaces. You can record anywhere, and well.

"I feel like touchscreen technology blows my mind still. It just makes me think of all of the sci-fi films I enjoyed as a kid."

Which do you most despise?
Bluetooth earpieces? I can't tell half the time if someone is actually on the phone or actually crazy. Plus it's just not a good look.

What fault are you most tolerant of in a gadget?
Lack of battery life. I think a lot of devices seem to suffer from that and everyone has to tolerate it on certain gadgets because it can be difficult to replace. And even if you can, the new battery sometimes ends up as bad as the last. For guys on tour, we're always on the make for a place to charge our stuff because of poor battery life.

Which are you most intolerant of?
I don't tolerate anything that runs slowly. Whether it be a phone, tablet or computer, it has to run at optimum speed. Especially when it comes to internet connectivity, but even with processing, RAM, etc.

When has your smartphone been of the most help?
Directions. I've been touring a lot and I don't always know how to get around. Google Maps on the iPhone is pretty helpful with that.

What device do you covet most?
Probably the Apogee Symphony I/O or the UAD Satellite. Recording. Yay!

If you could change one thing about your phone what would it be?
I'd change a lot. Maybe to have it not be made out of glass?

What does being connected mean to you?
Outside of real human connection, the simple ability to reach people immediately via my smartphone. It's become a part of human existence. Without a phone that can text, email and get onto social networking, a lot of people end up feeling naked and alone. Which is, as James Hetfield would say, "Sad, but true."

When are you least likely to reply to an email?
A really, really long email. My eyes hurt trying to read run-on sentences mashed into 12 paragraphs on a screen.

When did you last disconnect?
Probably the last time I left my phone in a cab. It was for two weeks. After two days, it was glorious.