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Picture the scene: your child speaks its first words, you've just spotted a public official in a compromising position or you've just shred some phenomenal powder. Of course, unless you've had cameras already set up and pointing at the action, it's not likely that you'll have that recorded for posterity. That's the idea behind meMini, a wearable camera that's constantly recording, but only preserves the last five minutes when you've spotted something worth saving.

meMini is the brainchild of New Zealanders Samuel Lee and Ben Bodley, and the former's snow sports background was the inspiration behind creating the hardware. While the technology is still in the fluid "late protptype" stage, Bodley's expertise with cameras has ensured that the unit will ship with a high quality 3.1-megapixel camera with a 160-degree field of view. In terms of storage, the meMini has 16GB of non-expandable memory, with a 32GB edition mooted as a bonus for a certain class of Kickstarter backer. Which brings us round to the price: as, like any invention from the last few years, the company will be taking to Kickstarter with the hope of raising $50,000, with the standard edition setting priced at $150 for early backers, while the standard edition is expected to retail for around $200.

Dana Wollman contributed to this report.

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