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Most invisibility cloaks require fairly exotic technology to work, such as fiber optics or light-altering metamaterials. That's not very practical, especially since the illusion still tends to break when you move. The University of Rochester may have a far more realistic solution, however -- it ha

1 month ago 0 Comments
September 29, 2014 at 12:49AM
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It's not as hard to make an invisibility cloak as you might think, but making one that's truly sophisticated is another matter; metamaterials (substances that change the behavior of light) are hard to build. Rice University appears to have solved part of the problem, however. It just developed a

2 months ago 0 Comments
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Those HDTV manufacturers did tell us that 3D was going to be everywhere this year, didn't they? Keeping up with the times, scientists investigating potential methods for rendering physical objects invisible to the human eye have now moved to the full three-dimensional realm. The Karlsruhe Institute

4 years ago 0 Comments
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You don't have to be able to pick a Romulan out of a crowd of Vulcans to be intrigued by the idea of cloaking, and indeed many non-trekkers have tried to hide things in plain sight using electromagnetism, acoustic superlenses, or light-bending materials. The latest attempt relies on devices that em

5 years ago 0 Comments
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This could either be that one giant leap, or just another in a long sequence of multidirectional small steps on the Quixotic quest for undetectability. So-called dc metamaterials are the chief culprit for inciting our interest anew, as researchers from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona have

5 years ago 0 Comments
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After a brief period of no news, it's time to revisit the world of invisible cloaks. Inspired by the ideas of theoretical physicist John Pendry at Imperial College, London, two separate groups of researchers from Cornell University and UC Berkeley claim to have prototyped their own cloaking devices

5 years ago 0 Comments
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There has been plenty of research into cloaking devices, but while scientists are still working their way towards the visible light spectrum they seem to be having the best luck with microwaves. Most recently, a new metamaterial made from over 10,000 individual pieces of fiberglass has been used to

5 years ago 0 Comments
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There has been plenty of research into cloaking devices, but while scientists are still working their way towards the visible light spectrum they seem to be having the best luck with microwaves. Most recently, a new metamaterial made from over 10,000 individual pieces of fiberglass has been used to

5 years ago 0 Comments
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We're only at the nano scale folks so you'll have to keep those high school fantasies of an invisibility-cloaked romp through the girls' locker room tucked away for now. Still, two teams of US government funded researchers under the direction of Xian Zhanga at UC Berkeley say that they've developed

6 years ago 0 Comments
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While not the first bunch to try and mesh invisibility with military equipment, the British Army is reportedly staying busy by \"testing technology it claims makes tanks and troops invisible.\" Apparently, the (previously) uber-secret trials were conducted by the Royal Engineers and scientists from Q

7 years ago 0 Comments