Latest in Brain scan

Image credit:

Neuroscientists read people's intentions with brain scan

Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

Minority Report has proven itself to be a fairly prescient movie on more than one occasion and, as this latest development shows, it seems that researchers haven't mined those Dickian ideas dry just yet. While we've already seen some software that supposedly helped to predict future crimes, The Guardian is now reporting that a team of neuroscientists have brought pre-crime technology to a new, even creepier level, developing a brain scan that can purportedly read people's intentions before they act on them. It's apparently still a ways off from going into service, however, with tests of the technology currently centered around predicting a subject's response to a simple math question. Nonetheless, the researchers seem to be well aware of the technology's potentially more complex uses, and are calling for an ethical debate over its possible use in interrogation. On the flipside, they also see the technology eventually being used in some less ethically-challenging applications, such as helping people control artificial limbs or operate a computer simply by thinking about it.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

NASA successfully deploys the James Webb Telescope's enormous mirror

NASA successfully deploys the James Webb Telescope's enormous mirror

View
The Morning After: Intel's 10th gen mobile CPUs cross the 5GHz barrier

The Morning After: Intel's 10th gen mobile CPUs cross the 5GHz barrier

View
Sonos has a big sale on its Beam, One and One SL speakers

Sonos has a big sale on its Beam, One and One SL speakers

View
Apple lets Amazon rent movies inside Prime Video's iPhone app

Apple lets Amazon rent movies inside Prime Video's iPhone app

View
Intel's 10th-gen H-series laptop CPUs reach 5.3GHz

Intel's 10th-gen H-series laptop CPUs reach 5.3GHz

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr