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Adobe says attackers compromised 2.9 million accounts, stole source code

Jon Fingas, @jonfingas
October 3, 2013
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If you've recently bought an Adobe product, you'll want to keep an eye out for suspicious financial transactions in the near future. The company says that attackers have compromised 2.9 million customer accounts, including their (thankfully encrypted) credit and debit card numbers. Hackers also took source code for certain apps, including Acrobat and ColdFusion. The two attacks might be related, according to Adobe. While the firm doesn't believe that the culprits have any unencrypted banking info, it's not taking chances: it's resetting passwords for affected users, warning them of financial risks and offering free credit monitoring. The breach won't necessarily hurt customers in the long run, but it isn't going to help Adobe's attempts to move its user base to subscription services.

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