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Extraterrestrial puzzle-platformer Paradise Lost to invade Steam, Wii U

Sinan Kubba, @sinankubba
November 15, 2013
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Alien-on-the-run sim Paradise Lost: First Contact proved a breakout hit on Kickstarter, after achieving its $70,000 goal in under half its allotted time. In Paradise Lost you play as a tentacled test subject from another world, using your telekinetic powers to break out of a pixelated Earth research lab. The concept caught the attention of more than 3000 backers who ensured the puzzle-platformer is coming to Steam for PC, Mac, and Linux in fall 2014. Not only is the game confirmed for those platforms, it's definitely on the way to Wii U too.

Developer Asthree originally listed the Wii U port as a $250,000 stretch goal, but after listening to backer feedback the Spanish studio made it a definite thing. Now the stretch goal is for a same-day Wii U version, set at $230,000. If the fundraiser falls short, the game will still come to the Nintendo platform but some time after it' hits Steam.

Asthree also added an additional multiplayer mode as the furthest of its stretch goals at $270,000. Other stretch goals include achievements, additional languages, and secret chapters, plus a realistic-ish $200,000 goal for PS4, PS3, and Vita ports.





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