Tim Easley

Plasticine circuits show how today's tech is tomorrow's art

Steve Dent, @stevetdent
May 28, 2018
0 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
    Image credit:

    Sponsored Links

    How will the people of tomorrow judge what we call advanced technology today? Artist Tim Easley explored that subject with a piece he created for the UK electronic dance music group Modified Man. Using plasticine clay, he created a highly detailed, fanciful circuit board measuring 20 by 20 inches (50 x 50 cm) for the cover of the duo's latest release, Modifications: Set 2.

    Adam Scrimshire and Dave Koor, the pair behind Modified Man, create electronic music with jazz/funk/soul influences by marrying vintage instruments and live performance. "By surrounding themselves in tapes, synths, microphones and reverb boxes, they've sought not to wallow in nostalgia, but to grab some physical, real energy from solid objects," the album notes say.

    To capture that vibe for the album art, Easley created a sculpture that also marries the analog and electronic. "The idea behind the cover was how the modified men of the future may make artwork out of ancient circuit boards, not quite understanding what they were for because of their crude appearance," wrote Easley on Behance. "For this I created a design with representations of computer chips and wires."

    He did the sculpture himself, using black, gray and white plasticine, starting with the chips in black, adding the white "solder" around them, and eventually filling in the electronic white traces and red wiring. The result is a whimsical, intricate design that must have required steady hands and a lot of fiddling.

    "It was sculpted entirely out of plasticine and took around 80 hours to complete," he noted. "I then photographed the piece from many different angles, and from this I created the cover and did the design for the rear." Some of the other photos (above), he notes, will be used on future Modified Man releases.

    The idea that our descendants might see today's cutting edge tech as so whimsically crude may be a bit hard to take. But then again, think about how silly 30-year-old Motorola brick cellphones look today, then think of how we'll see today's tech in, say, 200 years.

    All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
    Comment
    Comments
    Share
    Tweet
    Share

    Popular on Engadget

    Astronomers spot a strange, first-of-its-kind asteroid near Jupiter

    Astronomers spot a strange, first-of-its-kind asteroid near Jupiter

    View
    Space Station receives the last of NASA's science racks after 19 years

    Space Station receives the last of NASA's science racks after 19 years

    View
    Samsung Galaxy Note 20 leaks hint at giant screens and S20 Ultra features

    Samsung Galaxy Note 20 leaks hint at giant screens and S20 Ultra features

    View
    Texas Instruments makes it harder to run programs on its calculators

    Texas Instruments makes it harder to run programs on its calculators

    View
    What does Apple want from a VR events company?

    What does Apple want from a VR events company?

    View

    From around the web

    Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr