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The Morning After: ASUS’ ROG Phone 6 has a clip-on thermoelectric cooler

A beastly phone.

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Mat Smith
July 6, 2022 7:15 AM
In this article: themorningafter, gear, newsletter
ASUS ROG Phone 6 Pro and AeroActive Cooler 6.
Richard Lai/Engadget

In a nutshell, ASUS’ new powerful gaming phone is all about bigger specs and faster performance. It has a 165Hz 6.78-inch display, with 720Hz touch sampling rate, up to 18GB of RAM and a bigger 6,000mAh battery.

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Engadget

The most notable change is the revamped clip-on cooler that's arriving alongside the ROG Phone 6. You can toggle between four cooling settings in the updated Armoury Crate app's console, with a "Frozen" mode that pushes its Peltier chip to the max. This is only available when there's external power plugged into the device but ASUS claims the AeroActive Cooler 6 can lower the ROG Phone 6's surface temperature by up to a staggering 25 degrees Celsius (that’s 77 Fahrenheit), which sounds more like a portable air cooler than a smartphone accessory. As far as availability goes, ASUS says the ROG Phone 6 series will start from €999 (around $1,000) in Europe. US availability remains TBC.

-Mat Smith

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