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Shocker: wireless keylogging is quite easy

Evan Blass
December 3, 2007
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Well as usual, with the benefits of wireless technology come detriments in the form of security holes, and now a pair of researchers from Dreamlab have proven just how easy it is to sniff out the transmissions broadcast by RF keyboards. According to their whitepaper, "27MHz keyboard insecurities," Max Moser and Philipp Schrödel claim that keystroke signals sent from Microsoft's Wireless Optical Desktop 1000 and 2000 are encrypted with a simple one-byte offset cipher -- meaning that there are only 256 possible keys, with less than 50 sample strokes needed for decryption. And in case you thought you were safe with a non-Microsoft board, think again: Team Dreamlab is busy hacking Logitech's "Secure Connect" protocol as we speak. [Warning: PDF link]

[Via Hack-A-Day]



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