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Nikon's D3300 DSLR captures detailed, filter-free photos for $650

Jon Fingas, @jonfingas
January 6, 2014
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Nikon started removing optical low-pass filters on pro DSLRs, where owners are more likely to notice the extra detail, but that emphasis on super-sharp photos has been moving rapidly downrange. Today, it's reaching the entry level through the new D3300. Although the camera shoots at the same 24 megapixels as its predecessor, its filter-free sensor should produce crisper-looking pictures without pushing would-be buyers to costlier models. It also gets the newer Expeed 4 engine and its matching improvements to battery life, performance and image quality. The D3300 is still stuck with 11-point autofocusing, and there's no built-in WiFi, but it captures at a more sensitive ISO 12,800 (versus the D3200's ISO 6,400). It's the first Nikon DSLR with an Easy Panorama mode, too. Should you be intrigued by the D3300's blend of high resolution and beginner features, you can pick it up in February for $650 paired with an equally new, more compact 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR II lens. Veteran Nikon fans can buy the stand-alone lens at the same time for $250.

Gallery: Nikon D3300 press shots | 6 Photos

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