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Image credit: Nicole Lee

GoBreath makes fixing your lung capacity fun

The digital spirometer could be used to rehabilitate people with lung issues.
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Nicole Lee

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If you have issues with breathing after chest trauma, surgery or anesthesia, then there are breathing exercises designed to help. Normally, your ability to breathe is calculated by using a spirometer, which isn't that interactive -- or accurate. That's what prompted a team of Korean designers to begin working on GoBreath, a digital spirometer that tries to make breathing exercises fun. It's another one of Samsung's C-Lab projects to try and spin out neat product ideas from the Korean behemoth.

Gallery: GoBreath | 6 Photos

The small white device connects to a smartphone over Bluetooth, and then you breathe into it in the normal way. But on screen, rather than a dull metric of how well you're doing or a figure of your peak flow, the data are represented visually. For respiration, you need to follow a dot running along a graph, Flappy Bird-style, while coughing requires you to cough loud enough to shake the leaves from a cartoon tree.

Right now, it's just a demonstration, and the team doesn't — yet — have a clear road to turning this device into a product. But you never know, in a couple of years, we may see Samsung-branded digital spirometers in use to help folks with damaged lungs get back on their feet.

Nicole Lee contributed to this report.

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