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Nemeio is a completely customizable e-ink keyboard

Configure every key.
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Nemeio takes the static out of the keyboard, allowing users to change individual keys, set up hotkeys and establish custom layouts via the magic of e-ink. Nemeio features 81 keys, each one a tiny clear button over an e-ink display. The Nemeio software allows users to drag and drop icons for applications like Photoshop, Microsoft Word, Facebook or Skype anywhere on the keyboard, and also add app-specific tools like cropping or text box placement directly to the keyboard.

Nemeio supports any layout, any language (yes, even emoji), and users can import custom characters. It's wireless and connects to any device with Bluetooth capabilities, including smartphones and televisions.

Gallery: Nemeio e-ink keyboard | 7 Photos

Nemeio designers see the keyboard as a nomadic device, traveling with people as they go about their days. The keyboard is roughly 12 inches long, 7 inches tall, and 11 millimeters thick; the main body is brushed metal, while a matte black bar runs across the top. On the tip of that bar, there are two buttons that allow users to switch among profiles, plus USB and USB-C ports. The USB-C port charges the board, but designers expect the battery in the final iteration to last longer than a day, at least.

In-person, Nemeio is light and thin, and the e-ink shows clearly through each key. Its buttons are fairly flush with the metal body, and they don't depress much with each stroke, making this one a tough sell for fans of click-clack mechanical keyboards. The lack of haptic feedback also limits the keyboard's usefulness as a twitchy gaming device.

Nemeio e-ink keyboard

The Nemeio keyboard should ship this year, with the company aiming for a summer launch. There's no concrete price point yet, but it's expected to be priced between $300 and $500.

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