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Mind-controlled prosthetic arm moving to market in Europe

Laura June Dziuban
May 12, 2010
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Germany-based Otto Bock Healthcare has announced that its prototype prosthetic arm which can be controlled by thought is ready to hit the market. The device has been in testing on Christian Kandlbauer -- who doesn't have any arms and has a conventional prosthetic on his right side -- for the past four years. He's the first person in Europe to have a thought-controlled prosthesis installed, but the research is complete and the finished product should soon be available to the public. The arm makes use of targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR), which uses nerves that controlled the lost arm to control the prosthesis. The nerves are transplanted to the chest in a six-hour operation and enable the prosthetic control. The full details of the arm's operation and controls have yet to be unveiled, but hit up the source link for more information.

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