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Scosche's RDTX-PRO for iPhone and iPod touch detects radiation, funds charities

Billy Steele
August 31, 2011
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Scoshe already offers a fairly impressive range of mobile accessories, but its now branched out into some uncharted territory with its latest offering. The company has just announced its new RDTX-PRO radiation detector and app for the iPhone and iPod touch, which launches in Japan next month. With no calibration needed, the device attaches to your iOS handheld via the dock connector and offers gamma radiation detection above 60keV within +/- 5% accuracy. If that wasn't enough, the peripheral can also be used as a standalone alarm for radioactivity for up to 96 hours, and the aforementioned app will let you to share your findings via Facebook, Twitter or Google Maps. Still not convinced Scosche is fighting the good fight? Well, $10 from each $330 unit sold will benefit a group of charities dedicated to aiding those affected by the Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan. For an closer look at the UI, take a peek at the gallery below, or for the full rundown, hit the PR after the break.

Gallery: Scosche RDTX-PRO | 4 Photos


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Scosche Launches Radiation Detector and App for iPhone and iPod touch

Scosche will donate $10 from every sale to charities aiding those affected by the Tohoku
Earthquake and Tsunami, with a goal of 1 million dollars

Tokyo, Japan – August 31, 2011 – Scosche Industries, award-winning innovator of consumer technology, is excited to announce the RDTX-PRO radiation detector and app for iPhone and iPod touch. The radiation detector requires no calibration and allows users to accurately detect gamma radiation above 60keV within +/- 5% accuracy. The device attaches to an iPhone or iPod touch via the dock connection and is extremely compact for ease of use. It can also be used as a radiation alarm independently from the iOS device. When being used as a standalone alarm the RDTX-PRO runs on one AA battery and provides up to 96 hour of radiation detection.

"I was extremely impressed with the accuracy and performance of the RDTX-PRO from Scosche," said Julius James, Radiation Specialist of Fluke Global Calibration Laboratories. "The detector is as accurate as units that cost significantly more and is much smaller in size."

After connecting the Scosche RDTX-PRO with an iPhone or iPod touch users are prompted to download the free accompanying radTEST app. The app offers a consumer friendly meter display that shows radiation levels as safe (green), elevated (yellow) or dangerous (red). For the advanced user the digital display mode can be used to determine exact radiation levels. Users can also share their results using Facebook, Twitter and Google Maps.

The Scosche RDTX-PRO retail for $329.99 and will be available in September from Synexx in Tokyo Japan. $10 of each unit sold will be donated to a group of charities with a goal of reaching 1 million dollars within two years. The charities include the Bikki Children's Fund, Samaritan's Purse, All Hands Volunteers, and others committed to aiding those that were affected by the Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami.










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