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Oregon Scientific unveils ATC Beats WiFi sports cam and ATC Chaméléon dual-lens camera

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Oregon Scientific unveils ATC Beats WiFi sports cam and ATC Chaméléon dual-lens camera
Joining Oregon Scientific's range of waterproof sports cameras later this year are these two new models: the ATC Beats on the left and the ATC Chaméléon on the right. The Beats, arriving in November for $399, features 1080p 60fps video capture with a 130-degree field of view and a 270-degree rotatable lens, along with built-in GPS, accelerometer and heart rate monitor (via wireless chest belt) for those keen on recording some extra data. Most importantly, though, is its WiFi connectivity with any iPhone or Android device: not only can you do wireless file transfer with it, but much like the way ContourGPS Connect View app works, you can also use your phone as a wireless viewfinder. Pretty handy for when the camera's stuck on a helmet, of course.

The Chaméléon, on the other hand, is slated for a September launch at $199 only. While it doesn't have all those fancy wireless features, it boasts two 180-degree rotatable lenses (with a 110-degree field of view) at each end of the long body: one moves horizontally, and the other moves vertically; hence the name. The idea is that the camera can simultaneously capture 720p 30fps footage from both lenses (there's only one camera controller inside), and then output a synchronized horizontal or vertical split-screen video clip. We can already picture the Chaméléon being used on a surfing board or in a racing car, so there's certainly great potential here. Anyhow, enjoy our hands-on photos while you imagine the adrenaline rush.

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