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Scientists track fish health by 'finding Nemo'

James Trew, @itstrew
September 11, 2015
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While a Fitbit isn't much use to a flounder, a team at the University of Liverpool has figured out the next best thing. Dr Lynne Sneddon's team created a system that non-invasively monitors the welfare of our sub-aquatic friends. Two cameras monitor how healthy fish swim in three dimensions, while software picks out any critters showing irregular patterns. Any real-life Nemos get given a health score, alerting carers to which animals might need attention.

The system may have been developed for laboratory use, but it's clearly helpful to aquariums, too -- provided it scales. One nearby aquarium, Blue Planet, is already set to trial Dr. Sneddon's system, which will highlight how suitable it is for a commercial/larger scale environment. Sneddon's earlier work was instrumental in proving fish are capable of feeling pain.

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