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ProtonMail brings encrypted contacts to its mobile email app

Keep others' personal info private.
Jon Fingas, @jonfingas
March 29, 2018
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ProtonMail's encrypted contacts are now readily available beyond the web -- the company has updated its Android and iOS email apps to add the privacy-minded contacts manager. It uses zero-access encryption to prevent everyone but you (yes, including ProtonMail) from seeing anything besides a name and email address, and includes digital signatures to check for signs of tampering. It's pitched as ideal for journalists who may need to protect their contacts, but it could be just as important to you if you're worried that a thief might use your contacts as a burglary hit list.

Notably, this is also the first time the mobile app has had a full contacts manager. The upgrade makes ProtonMail a more practical option if you spend most of your computing time on smartphones than PCs. You'll still want to be extra-cautious even with encrypted contacts in place, but this will at least help you rest a little easier.

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