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Apple makes coding curriculum accessible for deaf and blind students

Everyone Can Code is rolling out in eight schools to start.
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Today, Apple announced that it is teaming up with educators to bring Everyone Can Code to schools for people who are deaf, blind and have other assistive needs. This fall, teachers at certain schools that serve students with disabilities will begin incorporating Everyone Can Code into their classroom curriculums.

"Apple's mission is to make products as accessible as possible," Apple CEO Tim Cook said in a statement. "We created Everyone Can Code because we believe all students deserve an opportunity to learn the language of technology. We hope to bring Everyone Can Code to even more schools around the world serving students with disabilities."

Through Everyone Can Code, Apple hopes to encourage kids to learn to code in an easy and appealing way, laying the groundwork for future STEM careers. The program is compatible with VoiceOver, which is sophisticated screen-reading technology for people with vision impairments. Using this gesture-based tech, people can learn to code without having to actually see the screen.

For students who have hearing disabilities, FaceTime can capture expressions and gestures so that they can fully interact with the program. Additionally features like Type to Siri and devices like Made for iPhone hearing aids can also help deaf students use Everyone Can Code.

The rollout of Everyone Can Code for students who are deaf and blind will start at eight schools. Presumably, Apple will work with these educators to refine the platform before making it available more widely. It's a great step for accessibility.

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