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Google Chrome now supports more password-free sign-ins

The browser also supports sensors for VR and fitness trackers.
Jon Fingas, @jonfingas
May 30, 2018
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Google is acting on its promise to banish more passwords. It just released Chrome 67 for the desktop, bringing the Web Authentication standard to what's arguably the most popular browser. As with Firefox, the technology allows password-free sign-ins (such as USB keys) through virtually any website rather than having to access specific services. And don't worry if you're still comfortable typing things in -- there are a few other useful additions.

This release supports the Generic Sensor API, a universal standard that lets web apps talk to sensors in devices like VR headsets and fitness trackers. You could move around a 3D world just by moving your head or wrist, for instance. You should also see a unified experience between mobile VR and its more advanced desktop counterparts. If you're nervous about Spectre-style attacks, there's also wider use of site isolation to reduce the chances of a page swiping data from your other browser tabs.

All told, this may be one of the more quietly significant Chrome updates in recent months. You'll have to wait for sites to support all the new features, but they could change how you interact with the web.

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