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Philips' extra-bright 4K HDR monitor is now available for $1,000

The first DisplayHDR 1000 monitor carries a premium.
Jon Fingas, @jonfingas
July 18, 2018
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EPI/Philips

If you've been salivating at the thought of Philips' (technically, EPI's) ultra-bright HDR monitor, you can now do more than clean up the mess you've left on the floor. The Momentum 43" 4K HDR Quantum Dot Monitor is now available from Amazon and Best Buy for a cool $1,000. That's a lot to pay for a computer screen, but it's also charting new ground -- this is the first PC monitor to support the DisplayHDR 1000 spec, promising 1,000cd/m2 brightness in scenes that call for it (say, staring at a bright sky) without crushing low-light detail. EPI also touts a wide, accurate color gamut that's particularly good at tackling dark reds and greens.

This being a Philips-branded panel, you can also expect Ambiglow to add some multi-color background lighting to your computing sessions. And yes, the creators know you might use this for gaming -- they're promising "incredibly low" input lag. This monitor is utter overkill for most people, but it might hit the spot if you're looking for a cinematic experience on your desk, size and cost be damned.

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