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AI generates non-stop stream of death metal

Shred guitars (and vocal chords) forever.
Jon Fingas, @jonfingas
April 21, 2019
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There's a limit to the volume of death metal humans can reproduce -- their fingers and vocal chords can only handle so much. Thanks to technology, however, you'll never have to go short. CJ Carr and Zack Zukowski recently launched a YouTube channel that streams a never-ending barrage of death metal generated by AI. Their Dadabots project uses a recurrent neural network to identify patterns in the music, predict the most common elements and reproduce them.

The result isn't entirely natural, if simply because it's not limited by the constraints of the human body. There are no real pauses. However, it certainly sounds the part -- you'll find plenty of hyper-fast drums, guitar thrashing and guttural growling. In a chat with Motherboard, Carr noted that death metal's rapid-fire pace is ideal for this as it creates more consistent output than you'd get with other, slower genres.

You're not about to see robots replacing death metal musicians on stage. That's not to say this is the end of the line. Carr and Zukowski hope to add audience interaction with Dadabots, so there might be a day when you can steer the AI's output and satisfy your exact tastes in heavy-sounding tunes.

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